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Eddie Martinez: Inside Thoughts
Press
Eddie Martinez: Inside Thoughts
The Brooklyn Rail February 24, 2021

Meaty and heady, Eddie Martinez’s densely packed paintings, rich with associations and imagery—all in the form of quotidian objects, sports paraphernalia, kitchen and dining items, art-history fragments—refuse to commit to a specific time or style. Martinez’s sensibility is part of a diffuse modernist past—Dada, Fluxus, Neo Realism, Cubism, Surrealism, food art, and so on—as well as a huge sampling of the contemporary zeitgeist, including skateboards and graffitied walls. In a canvas titled Embarcadero 88 (2020), frightening black-outlined, ghostlike faces stare out at us like terrified immigrants or victims of a natural disaster, while organic shapes punctuate paintings in the company of board games, lots of flowers, and playing cards.

Inside Thoughts: Eddie Martinez @ Mitchell-Innes & Nash, NYC
Press
Inside Thoughts: Eddie Martinez @ Mitchell-Innes & Nash, NYC
Juxtapoz February 23, 2021

It's sometimes unfair, as an observer of art, writer or (gulp) a critic to project onto an artist when it comes to intention or what you want from their work. I've tried to avoid it, but sometimes you have to recognize when you have borrowed a thought, or an observation, from an artist. I had this with Eddie Martinez a few years back, in the midst of an interview with him for the magazine. We were talking about his famed blockheads, but mostly we spoke about volume and process; this idea of "exhausting compositions." I loved it; the phrase felt so visual. He said, "But someone like Picasso, not only was he making all kinds of work in different mediums all the time, he was also exhausting the same sort of compositions and imagery because he just felt like they were always variable. That's something that has hit me. That's something I just respond to with his work right away because it feels natural to me anyway. And seeing someone who did it their whole life sort of gave me more confidence to do it."

Why Painter Eddie Martinez Is Having His Biggest Market Year Yet
Press
Why Painter Eddie Martinez Is Having His Biggest Market Year Yet
Artsy August 6, 2020

There are few artists whose work is more in demand right now than Eddie Martinez. The Brooklyn-based painter’s large, thickly impastoed canvases—some figurative, some abstract, and most somewhere in between—have been winning over dealers, collectors, and curators for the better part of two decades. In the last three years, that deep-rooted support has metastasized into a rapidly accelerating and global market.

Eddie Martinez: Fast Serve
Press
Eddie Martinez: Fast Serve
Juxtapoz March 2020

What do you discuss when talking to a painter’s painter, the artist everyone cites as their favorite or an influential force? Well, you obviously talk about painting and painters. And, in the instance of sitting down with Brooklyn-based painter, Eddie Martinez, you chat about tennis, strategy and the art of collecting. There is an energy that emanates from Martinez’s work, something hypnotic that whirs in constant motion. In a way, his idea about “exhausting compositions” does not feel like defeat but instead, a powerful indicator that a life in art isn’t just one work, but about decades of output and practice. Martinez is fascinated by speed, but also comfortable in volume, as he explained throughout an early morning winter conversation. We talked about his massive 65-foot painting recently shown in Shanghai, a newborn altering his schedule, and how his flower pot works will show up in an upcoming show with his wife, Sam Moyer, in San Francisco. 

EDDIE MARTINEZ’S TRIUMPHANT ABSTRACTIONS LAND AT THE BRONX MUSEUM OF THE ARTS
by Ted Loos
EDDIE MARTINEZ’S TRIUMPHANT ABSTRACTIONS LAND AT THE BRONX MUSEUM OF THE ARTS
Culture Magazine November 2018

Martinez’s distinctive color sense—primary tones that are interrupted and shaped by black and white and some in-between hues—also follows his gut, and so far, so good. “It’s completely instinctual,” he says. “I don’t know color theory, and I’m not concerned if I’m doing it right or if I’m doing it wrong. It’s just the way I do it.”

Eddie Martinez Opens His First Museum Show At The Davis Museum
by Ann Binlot
Eddie Martinez Opens His First Museum Show At The Davis Museum
Forbes October 27, 2017

The exhibition, titled Ants at a Picknic, which is on view until December 17, 2017, includes a series of new, frenetic large-scale mandala paintings, 17 tabletop painted bronze sculptures and drawings on paper. “The works in Ants at a Picknic make plain that Martinez has hit his stride,” said Dr. Lisa Fischman, Ruth Gordon Shapiro ’37 director of the Davis Museum and curator of the exhibition. “The cosmic hooks, the summoning of spirits, the virtuoso line, the command of color and composition — it all adds up to its own kind of brilliance.”

Eddie Martinez: Studio Wall
Press
Eddie Martinez: Studio Wall
Time Out New York October 2017

Known for colorful paintings that recall midcentury abstraction, Martinez is plastering the Drawing Center with thousands of sketches that he will change throughout the exhibition’s run, a gesture that mimics his practice of keeping a wall in his studio reserved for drawings and studies. The show also includes paintings and large works on paper.  

An interview with artist eddie martinez on his latest show 'cowboy town' at timothy taylor, london
By JETHRO TURNER
An interview with artist eddie martinez on his latest show 'cowboy town' at timothy taylor, london
Purple.fr April 7, 2017

“I’m gonna grab my roller chair,” says Eddie Martinez. Which he does. We’re in Timothy Taylor in London looking at his new paintings. The very kind PR who has offered to get me a coffee has returned with it, but there’s nowhere to put it near us, with me standing and holding a phone as a mic, and Eddie sitting in his office roller chair, so the coffee sits slowly cooling on the side of the conversation like a gooseberry while we talk. I drink it on the way out and it’s still a nice temperature. If you get bored at any point reading this, think about the coffee.

Eddie is the kind of guy who gets himself a roller chair without asking if I’d like one too, but he also invites me to touch the paintings and explains them, and it’s all nice. He’s also apologetic about his self-professed inarticulacy and I should have told him that he didn’t need to be.

Gallery Hopping: Eddie Martinez Plays Cowboys and Politics at Timothy Taylor
By Perwana Nazif
Gallery Hopping: Eddie Martinez Plays Cowboys and Politics at Timothy Taylor
Artnet News April 3, 2017

Timothy Taylor‘s “Cowboy Town” exhibition—which opened to the public on Thursday—gathers a series of new paintings by Brooklyn-based artist Eddie Martinez. 

Studio Visit: Eddie Martinez
By Courtney Willis Blair
Studio Visit: Eddie Martinez
Forbes March 3, 2016

In a stunning exhibition at Mitchell-Innes & Nash titled Salmon Eye (Martinez’s wife’s name is Sam), nine new paintings sit squarely on the walls in the 3400-square foot white cube. An amalgamation of abstraction and figuration, the work is so quintessentially Martinez and yet wildly different from what we’ve expected from the Brooklyn-based painter. On a cold night of drizzle, we visited Martinez’s new studio in Bushwick. The duplex space was expectedly cold, filled with neatly cluttered spray paint cans and large crayons. And for an hour, we talked shop, hitting on topics from self-care to artistic influences to why his new work feels just a little bit lighter. Here’s what he had to say.

Eddie Martinez
Press
Eddie Martinez
The New Yorker February 17, 2016

The Brooklyn artist’s big, rambunctious, terrifically friendly canvases collapse seven decades of painting, reviving styles of the Cobra painters (Alechinsky, Jorn, Appel) and adding hints from Americans (de Kooning, Guston, Basquiat, Wool). Martinez silkscreens blowups of his spontaneous drawings and then has at them with oils, enamel, and spray paint. There’s lots of white space, in which black lines and flavorful colors frolic, keyed to what Martinez describes as the Cobra “embrace of the child’s hand.” Does the art world sometimes feel like school? Welcome to recess!

Eddie Martinez "Salmon Eye"
by Juliana Balestin
Eddie Martinez "Salmon Eye"
Purple.fr Feburary 2, 2016

A detail of new work by EDDIE MARTINEZ featured in his first solo exhibition with Mitchell-Innes & Nash. The large format paintings showcase Martinez’s bold brushstrokes and bold approach to traditional subject matter. For Salmon Eye, the artist builds upon his previous bodies of work by revealing a new dynamism in his narrative and deft approach to his canvases.

‘I Needed to Figure Out Something I Could Make Myself’: A Talk With Eddie Martinez
by Bill Powers
‘I Needed to Figure Out Something I Could Make Myself’: A Talk With Eddie Martinez
ARTnews January 25, 2016
Eddie Martinez Edges Toward Abstraction
By Scott Indrisek
Eddie Martinez Edges Toward Abstraction
ArtInfo September 19, 2014

After “Matador,” a 2013 exhibition at the Journal Gallery in Brooklyn, Eddie Martinez sort of hated paint. “I had a negative reaction, I got really turned off by it,” said the artist, who found himself avoiding the studio after completing the works in the aforementioned show: Large, quasi-abstract canvases that serially explored the contours of a Picasso-esque bull. To deal with his creative block, Martinez started walking the beach on the North Fork of Long Island during the summer, pondering if three-dimensional work might be the way forward.

Barry McGee X Eddie Martinez
By Barry McGee, Rachel Small
Barry McGee X Eddie Martinez
Interview September 2014

Eddie Martinez is indomitable. He is a prolific draftsman, an active curator, and he's getting ready to fill a four-story gallery in Seoul, South Korea, early next year. His idiosyncratic drawing style is deceptively simple and has the magical, faux naïve quality of Paul Klee. The 31-year-old's large studio in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, is filled with ceramic miniatures he's been collecting for years. It also holds an extraordinary amount of work: charcoal drawings of his French bulldog, ink sketches of densely covered tabletops, and walls covered in large canvases. Martinez shows at ZieherSmith in Chelsea, New York, but has been spending more time on the South Shore in Massachusetts, where he has a second studio.
 

Eddie Martinez
By George Newall
Eddie Martinez
Apollo Magazine April 11, 2013

Currently on view at The Journal gallery in Brooklyn, this exhibition of works by New York-based, Eddie Martinez consists of five large-scale paintings, all derived from a single composition. These canvases, which form part of the ‘Matador’ series, are the product of Martinez’s endeavour to test and repeat, exhaustively, a basic arrangement of form and colour. For the artist, they are ‘a study in making the same painting, but differently.’

Art in Review: Eddie Martinez
By Roberta Smith
Art in Review: Eddie Martinez
New York Times February 11, 2010

Eddie Martinez, who briefly attended art school in Boston and spent more time there working outdoors on graffiti art, has exceptional gifts as a painter and draftsman, which he exuberantly combines. Generally, he has not yet made them his own, but his third show at ZieherSmith suggests enough determination, industriousness and dexterity to get the job done.

Eddie Martinez
By Claire Barliant
Eddie Martinez
TimeOut New York February 1, 2010

Eddie Martinez’s paintings, drawings and etchings have a kitchen-sink quality to them: The painter seems to unload his full arsenal of skills, as well as the contents of his brain, onto every one. Composed of an assortment of images that almost add up to a communicable message, though not quite, his works read like rebuses or maniacal maps to lost treasure. In the large-scale Back Looker, for instance, an immense comic-book speech bubble emerges from the mouth of a supine daydreamer, with several of Martinez’s favorite motifs, including a duck’s face and a frog’s lips. In the artist’s deft hands, these childish doodles radiate a sinister energy.

Eddie Martinez
By David Coggins
Eddie Martinez
Interview December 2008

Eddie Martinez is indomitable. He is a prolific draftsman, an active curator, and he's getting ready to fill a four-story gallery in Seoul, South Korea, early next year. His idiosyncratic drawing style is deceptively simple and has the magical, faux naïve quality of Paul Klee. The 31-year-old's large studio in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, is filled with ceramic miniatures he's been collecting for years. It also holds an extraordinary amount of work: charcoal drawings of his French bulldog, ink sketches of densely covered tabletops, and walls covered in large canvases. Martinez shows at ZieherSmith in Chelsea, New York, but has been spending more time on the South Shore in Massachusetts, where he has a second studio.

Eddie Martinez at ZieherSmith
By David Coggins
Eddie Martinez at ZieherSmith
Art in America October 2006

Eddie Martinez’s promising solo debut is full of joyous work that creates its own entrancing world. His paintings and drawings feature a recurring cast of men in baseball hats, gliding parrots and coiled snakes who all stare at us with striking, overlarge eyes. They populate incongruous landscapes full of vivid pattern and color, unified by the visceral pleasure Martinez takes in their invention.

Debut: Eddie Martinez
By Anthony Downey
Debut: Eddie Martinez
ArtReview June 2006

Eddie Martinez’s paintings come out of this practice of drawing, and there is a significant – you could say even an overarching – degree of compulsiveness to them.

In the exhibition “A Horse with No Name” the ostensible subject matter is drawn, so to speak, from Martinez’s immediate environment. Everything is diverse and diverting, as well as multicoloured: parrots, rooftops, baseball caps, bases of flowers, pictures, snakes, cats, road signs – and all are revisited again and again.