9 Art Events to Attend This Week in New York City
Press
9 Art Events to Attend This Week in New York City
ARTnews September 10, 2018

Pope.L has called the works on view at this show “a disgustingly neat pile of doubt, experiment, and denial shoved up hot against claim, leap, gambit, and caesura—your basic scrabbling about in the dark . . .” Included are works from the artist’s “RePhoto” collage series, for which he edited and recombined images of body parts to create “figural encounters,” as well as sculptures and an installation featuring versions of Pope.L’s video Syllogism. Titled “One thing after another (part two),” the show follows Pope.L’s recent winning of the Whitney Museum’s $100,000 Bucksbaum Award.

Martha Rosler and Hito Steyerl: War Games
by Lisa E. Bloom
Martha Rosler and Hito Steyerl: War Games
The Brooklyn Rail September 4, 2018

Given the ongoing political upheavals in the US, and the EU, what kind of artists’ work is relevant in an age of populist uprisings, when the far right is gaining power throughout the world? Martha Rosler and Hito Steyerl: War Games, one of the most important exhibitions of the year, offers compelling evidence in answer to such a question. This affectively and intellectually intriguing exhibition is noteworthy in demonstrating the surprising affinities and shared concerns across countries (US and Germany) and generations (’60s and ’90s) of two renowned women artists. Both are theoreticians and creative practitioners whose work reveals the capacity of art to understand and transform the violence which shapes our world.

Justine Kurland
By Wendy Vogel
Justine Kurland
Artforum September 2018

At Mitchell-Innes & Nash, Kurland’s series, exhibited for the first time in its entirety, was cinematic in spirit. The sixty-nine vintage C-prints hung in a single line around the gallery. The narrative opened with a photograph taken in the postindustrial landscape of New Haven, Connecticut, and continued across multiple road trips that Kurland took over the course of five years. In these staged images, her subjects absorb themselves in activities by and for each other, from drawing on one another’s backs to killing small game. They could be plucked from sundry girl-centric films of the 1990s—think Sofia Coppola’s The Virgin Suicides (1999) or Gillian Armstrong’s Little Women (1994). Wearing threadbare, slouchy clothes, sans makeup, and often with no men in sight, these girls “act” more often than “appear”—to reverse the terms of John Berger’s famous phrase, “Men act and women appear.”

From Joan Mitchell’s Early Works to Daniel Arsham’s Dystopian Future: 45 Can’t-Miss Gallery Shows in New York This September
By Sarah Cascone & Caroline Goldstein
From Joan Mitchell’s Early Works to Daniel Arsham’s Dystopian Future: 45 Can’t-Miss Gallery Shows in New York This September
Artnet News August 30, 2019

In this follow up to his similarly named solo show at La Panacee museum in Montpellier, Pope.L presents works—including a selection of “Re-Photo” collages, his Syllogism video project, and wall-mounted assemblage sculptures in acrylic boxes—that he describes as “a disgustingly neat pile of doubt, experiment, and denial shoved up hot against claim, leap, gambit, and caesura.”

Martha Rosler and Hito Steyerl “War Games” at Kunstmuseum Basel, Basel
By Riccardo Conti
Martha Rosler and Hito Steyerl “War Games” at Kunstmuseum Basel, Basel
Mousse Magazine August 2018

The War Games proposed by Martha Rosler and Hito Steyerl in their new exhibition at Kunstmuseum Basel reflect the pitfalls of a war fought in the folds of media and technology in the present. The show, curated by Søren Grammel, compares the artistic research of the two artists, who are of different generations but nevertheless have many common threads.

MITCHELL-INNES & NASH TAKES ON THE BIG SCREEN FOR ITS SUMMER SHOW
By Maria Vogel
MITCHELL-INNES & NASH TAKES ON THE BIG SCREEN FOR ITS SUMMER SHOW
Cultured July 31, 2018

Though there is an immediacy in film that feels particularly poignant at this time, the show’s significance is not dependent on our culture’s heightened awareness. The ideas these videos consider are neither new nor are they temporary. They remain critical to examine decade after decade.

Loaded with Symbolism, a Fountain Sculpture by Pope.L is Among New Acquisitions at Carnegie Museum of Art
By Victoria L. Valentine
Loaded with Symbolism, a Fountain Sculpture by Pope.L is Among New Acquisitions at Carnegie Museum of Art
culture type July 29, 2018

Earlier this month, the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh announced several new acquisitions, including “Fountain (reparations version)” (2016-17) by Chicago-based Pope.L. The sculpture is on view in the modern and contemporary galleries which have been re-hung to reflect the “depth, diversity, and eccentricities” of the Carnegie Museum’s collection.

Jacolby Satterwhite Now Represented By Mitchell-Innes & Nash
by Annie Armstrong
Jacolby Satterwhite Now Represented By Mitchell-Innes & Nash
ARTNEWS July 12, 2018

The New York-based gallery Mitchell-Innes & Nash has added Jacolby Satterwhite to its roster. He will debut his latest video piece, Avenue B,as part of the summer series “35 Days of Film,” with the gallery’s space in Chelsea devoted to the work July 20-24. Satterwhite will also have his first solo exhibition with the gallery this fall.

Martha Rosler’s Powerful Collages Are a Wake-Up Call to America
by Alina Cohen Mar 9, 2018 2:59 pm
Martha Rosler’s Powerful Collages Are a Wake-Up Call to America
Artsy June 28, 2018

Martha Rosler thinks that Vietnam anti-war literature of the 1960s and ’70s was hideous. “It would be these long texts that looked like they’d been translated from a foreign language, and they didn’t have images,” the artist remembered during a recent conversation with Artsy. The pamphlets and other materials, she said, looked like they were made by people who were somewhat demented. Rosler decided the cause needed a makeover.

Justine Kurland: Girl Pictures, 1997-2002 at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
by Jean Dykstra
Justine Kurland: Girl Pictures, 1997-2002 at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
photograph June 26, 2018

Starting in New Haven, where she was finishing her graduate studies at Yale, Kurland drove across the country (with a stint in New Zealand) photographing adolescent girls in scenes that are part bucolic idyll, part Lord of the Flies. A gritty, outlaw narrative connects scenes often photographed with the composition and soft light of 19th-century landscape paintings. (Kurland named her son Caspar, after all, for Caspar David Friedrich.) Three of the images have “Boy Torture” in in their titles, but unless the girls are tormenting one, boys seldom feature. Sex simmers under the surface, not to mention – and more importantly – self-sufficiency. These ad hoc communities of young women are precursors to Kurland’s series a few years later, Of Woman Born, pastoral photographs of naked mothers and their small naked children who seem just as self-reliant.

The Lawless Energy of Teen-Age Girls
by Naomi Fry
The Lawless Energy of Teen-Age Girls
The New Yorker June 24, 2018

In recent years, on Instagram and in fashion magazines, a girl-centric aesthetic has taken hold. Young photographers such as Petra Collins, Olivia Bee, and Mayan Toledano have been capturing the private rites and practices of adolescents—in school, at parties, on road trips, alone in their bedrooms. The style, pretty and wistful, straddles fashion, fine art, even reportage. We might see a shapely young arm raised to reveal a hint of armpit hair; dewy skin dappled by disco lights; girls huddled around a mirror, putting on makeup.

Justine Kurland
By Johanna Fateman
Justine Kurland
4Columns June 15, 2018

The runaways of Justine Kurland’s Girl Pictures, 1997–2002—feral teens living in moody, thrill-seeking packs at the gorgeous outskirts of civilization—bear a more than passing resemblance to the Runaways. It’s as though the members of the legendary seventies girl band wandered away from their tour bus at a highway rest stop and just kept going. What would their raw rebellion and sexual self-possession look like offstage, without an audience, in the wild? Kurland answers with sixty-nine transfixing photographs.

Documenting Girlhood: Justine Kurland’s Captivating Pictures, 20 Years On
by Tish Wrigley
Documenting Girlhood: Justine Kurland’s Captivating Pictures, 20 Years On
AnOther June 5, 2018

“I staged the girls as a standing army of teenaged runaways in resistance to patriarchal ideals,” she says. “The girls in these photographs have gathered together in solidarity, claiming territory outside the margins of family and institutions.” Kurland would scout evocative locations, often with links to the 19th-century Western frontier, and recruit her youthful subjects from local towns and schools. “I never knew where I would end up or whom I would find,” she says, “so it was impossible to predetermine the outcome. I allowed my narratives to unravel as I constructed them. I wanted the pictures to contain both my projection and the actuality of the situation.” 
 

Performing the future: how two young artists use robots and VR to explore alternative realities
by Kathy Noble
Performing the future: how two young artists use robots and VR to explore alternative realities
Art | Basel June, 2018

Flaka Haliti and Jacolby Satterwhite reimagine the social systems of the world that structure our lives. Satterwhite takes his childhood’s domestic setting to build futuristic virtual landscapes. In his hands, the familiar environment becomes a stage on which to perform scenes of queer sadomasochistic role-play, which he sees as a metaphor for late capitalist domination and subjugation.

Jacolby Satterwhite
by Alina Cohen
Jacolby Satterwhite
Art in America June 1, 2018

Jacolby Satterwhite’s exhibition at Gavin Brown’s enterprise transformed the gallery into a kind of nightclub—that ultimate escapist’s paradise. Visitors entered a hallway where they could pick up glow stick necklaces from glass jars on the ground, after which they emerged in the darkened exhibition space. Playing on both sides of a screen suspended in the middle of the room was a trippy animated film, Blessed Avenue (2018). A purple neon sign reading pat’s, meanwhile, beckoned visitors toward a back area and gave the room a soft glow.

This Photographer Envisioned a Fierce Army of Girls, Forging Their Own Paths
By Alina Cohen
This Photographer Envisioned a Fierce Army of Girls, Forging Their Own Paths
Artsy May 23, 2018

Throughout her career, photographer Justine Kurland has trained her lens on divergent subjects both documentary and staged: young girls, nude mothers, men at auto body shops. Across her work, there’s a muted sense of romance, of both gritty desire and desperation. Kurland relishes gravel, fences, dead animals, cell phone towers, broken windows, and car engines. Now a mother herself, she’s ultimately outgrown the label that once reductively described her young, female cohort who captured even younger women on rolls of film: “girl photographers.”  

Girlhood Across America, Captured by One Photographer
By Jamie Sims
Girlhood Across America, Captured by One Photographer
T Magazine May 21, 2018

The photographer Justine Kurland didn’t learn how to drive until she was 27, a year before she set off on a two-decade-long road trip. At the time, she was an M.F.A. candidate at Yale working on her now-iconic series “Girl Pictures” (1997-2002), staged portraits of adolescent girls cast as runaways wandering beneath highway overpasses and mucking around in roadside drainage ditches. At first she stayed close to home, shooting in and around New Haven, Conn., but eventually she began traveling farther afield; she wanted her own process to reflect the stories her images told. “If the girls were running away,” she tells T, “then it made sense that I should, too.” 

Keltie Ferris: (F(U(T( )U)R)E)
The Brooklyn Rail
Keltie Ferris: (F(U(T( )U)R)E)
by David Rhodes May 17, 2018

This exhibition of paintings and drawings marks a bold and confident change in the working methods of Keltie Ferris. A significant departure has been made from the characteristically fuzzy and pixelated images taken and transformed from screens present in previous paintings. In their stead is an assertive—and risky—incursion of influence from high profile painters—George Condo, Christopher Wool, and Jonathan Lasker—but especially Wool, of whom Ferris has said, “I feel like Christopher Wool is so influential, he’s almost like our de Kooning right now. Everyone is copying him, or riffing on what he has brought to the table.”

To Do: May 16–May 30, 2018
By Jerry Saltz
To Do: May 16–May 30, 2018
New York Magazine May 13, 2018

Ferris can always be counted on to push the perimeters of her intensely optical abstract paintings, and this show finds her, now 41, experimenting, rethinking, slowing down, mixing marble dust into her oil paint, laying down stenciled polygonal shapes, wiping out areas of canvas, and leaving severe spray-painted black lines as structure. 

Jacolby Satterwhite
by Chloe Wyma
Jacolby Satterwhite
Artforum May 2018

Leather queens, club kids, and bare-breasted femmes writhe and vogue in crystalline enclosures overlooking churning purple galaxies. Bound to one another and to sinister machines by a network of multicolored intestinal tubing, pliable virtual bodies pleasure and punish each other in acrobatic scenarios, their mechanical gyrations powered by a sovereign libidinal clockwork. The factory and the dance floor, Fordism and fetishism, play and werk, collapse into undifferentiated opalescence. Across a torpid twenty minutes, titillation yields to monotony, anhedonia, alienation. In a rapacious feedback loop, alienation transubstantiates to kink. 

Jacolby Satterwhite
Goings On About The Town
Jacolby Satterwhite
The New Yorker May 1, 2018

Pick up a pink glow-stick bracelet on your way into “Blessed Avenue,” Satterwhite’s impressive début with the gallery. A large screen bisects the black-walled space, playing a hallucinatory video—a Boschian sci-fi tableau—which attests to the artist’s command of digital animation and 3-D-modelling software. In the endless simulated shot, dancers and S & M performers populate a gay mega-club, a maze of fragmented machinery apparently adrift in space. The dystopian scene has a surprisingly poignant twist: the action is set to an electronic soundtrack created from cassette tapes of the artist’s mother, singing a capella. In the accompanying installation, a conceptual boutique, the artist hawks affordable items from pill organizers to tambourines, all printed with dashed-off drawings and charming, handwritten notes.

Justine Kurland
by Rebecca Bengal
Justine Kurland
So It Goes Issue 11 Volume 1

The girls were rebelling. The girls were acting out. The girls had run away from home, that much was clear. They were trying on a version of themselves that the world had thus far shown them was boy. FLoating a raft downt he Mississippi. Tucking smokes into the sleve of a T-shirt. Having a rumble. Living off the land. Cowboys, sailors, pirates, hitchhikers, hobos, train hoppers, explorers, catchers in the rye, lords of the flies – you name it, all the dominion of boys. If you wanted a place in the narrative, you had to imagine yourself inside of it. 

Beautiful Shows for Beautiful Weather: 34 New York Gallery Exhibitions to See This May
By Sarah Cascone & Caroline Goldstein
Beautiful Shows for Beautiful Weather: 34 New York Gallery Exhibitions to See This May
Artnet News May 1, 2018

Between 1997 and 2002, Justine Kurland traveled across the United States photographing girls living vastly different lives, but all in the tenuous places between childhood and adulthood. Kurland printed all 69 pictures taken over the four-year period for the first time this year, two decades after the project began. This is the first time they appear as a complete series.

Three-Sentence Reviews
By Jerry Saltz
Three-Sentence Reviews
Vulture April 30, 2018

I’ve been a fan of Keltie Ferris’s hot Day-Glo spray-painted, structured, multi-matrixed large paintings since she emerged fresh out of Yale’s MFA program in the mid-aughts. Always to be counted on for pushing the perimeters of her intensely optical abstract paintings, this show finds Ferris, now 41, experimenting, rethinking, slowing down, mixing marble dust into her oil paint, laying down stenciled polygonal shapes, wiping out areas of canvas, leaving severe spray-painted black lines as structure. The results are less lively, even, and visually arresting than her previous work, and they fit more into a tradition that might include Fiona Rae, David Story, and Guy Goodwin — artists more dependent on visible structure, clearer geometry, and deploying a menu of marks and configurations on canvas, all to lesser effect than Ferris has already reached — but I will not stop paying attention to this live wire.

Jay DeFeo
Press
Jay DeFeo
The New Yorker April 2018

Among the seventy fascinatingly varied works on view in this decades-spanning show is an untitled piece, from 1973, that meets the barest definition of a collage—it’s a single rose, cut carefully from a black-and-white photo, floating on a white background. With this breezy, refined gesture, the artist, who worked in the San Francisco Bay area until her death, in 1989, conjures her most famous painting, “The Rose,” from 1958-1966, which, as a Sisyphean two-ton grisaille relief, could not be more different.

What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
by Roberta Smith, Martha Schwendener and Will Heinrich
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
The New York Times April 11, 2018

There is a lot to see, hear and buy in Jacolby Satterwhite’s “Blessed Avenue” at Gavin Brown on the Lower East Side. A pop-up store in the gallery is selling cheap bespoke items like pencils, pill cases and bottled water. An eerie, disembodied voice, singing in an R&B-inflected falsetto, filters throughout the space and you can purchase Mr. Satterwhite’s new self-described concept album, also titled “Blessed Avenue.”

Jay DeFeo and the Anarchic Spirit of Surrealism
By John Yau
Jay DeFeo and the Anarchic Spirit of Surrealism
Hyperallergic April 7, 2018

DeFeo was after something other than a chance meeting on a dissecting table of a sewing machine and an umbrella. For her, surrealism was not a technique, but a state of seeing and experiencing everyday life.

Jacolby Satterwhite: ‘Blessed Avenue'
By Dana Kopel
Jacolby Satterwhite: ‘Blessed Avenue'
Frieze April 5, 2018

You enter the gallery as though walking into a club. A darkened hallway opens up onto a room pulsing with music, dimly lit by a purple neon sign near the far back wall. The cool glow of a massive video projection reveals a scene from some futuristic S&M rave: young people in black leather dance, vogue, crawl, pose, whip one another and lead each other around on leashes. Jacolby Satterwhite appears among them, on hands and knees in a leather jockstrap and harness, while artist Juliana Huxtable playfully flogs him with a long, braided whip. These are his friends, his social world, whom the artist has captured in green screen video and transposed into this animated technofuture.

JACOLBY SATTERWHITE: Blessed Avenue
by Osman Can Yerebakan
JACOLBY SATTERWHITE: Blessed Avenue
The Brooklyn Rail April 4, 2018

On the third floor of an unassuming Chinatown building, a dark hallway leads to Blessed Avenue, Jacolby Satterwhite’s psychedelic quest into queer desire and memory, a twenty-minute digital animation created with Maya computer software. In order to do justice to the film’s bizarre rituals performed by Juliana Huxtable, Lourdes Leon Ciccone, and DeSe Escobar alongside Satterwhite, Gavin Brown’s enterprise orchestrated the gallery similar to an underground club, from glow-sticks occasionally available at the entrance to the pitch-dark atmosphere elevating the film’s visual and audial impact. The exhibition's titular piece runs on a large, two-sided screen, which emanates enough light to let visitors inspect a pop-up retail installation that displays merchandise complimenting the film.

Outrageous Fortune: Jay DeFeo and Surrealism
by Jessica Holmes
Outrageous Fortune: Jay DeFeo and Surrealism
The Brooklyn Rail April 4, 2018

In dream analysis, it’s said that the familiar nightmare of one’s teeth falling out represents anxiety over the possible loss of control. Fading beauty, or an inability to communicate might cause such a dream, but so too might a more catastrophic event: an illness or an eviction, perhaps. For artist Jay DeFeo (1929-1989) any of these occurrences could have provoked such a night terror, and walking through Outrageous Fortune: Jay DeFeo and Surrealism at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, one can’t help but wonder if teeth dreams had plagued her. The exhibition takes as its premise the thrum of Surrealism that murmurs through DeFeo’s body of work, and the reappearance of teeth is one of several tropes that surface.

Jacolby Satterwhite's mesmerizing 20 minute video odyssey 'Blessed Avenue'
by Sarah Kennedy
Jacolby Satterwhite's mesmerizing 20 minute video odyssey 'Blessed Avenue'
The Telegraph April 2, 2018

Blessed Avenue is a cornucopia of monsters, misfits and dancers including Madonna’s daughter Lourdes in imaginary dreamscapes in clubland and beyond. Satterwhite has said he is more concerned for his work to be shown in museums than private collections. In contemporary art in New York, the industry thrives much more upon knowing the names and M.Os of the most cutting edge creatives, rather than actually owning any of their work. 

GCC at the James Gallery
By Murtaza Vali
GCC at the James Gallery
Artforum April 2018

Much of the recent work of GCC–the group of artists whose eight members hail from various Persian Gulf countries, and whose name references the acronym for a regional political and economic alliance known as the Gulf Cooperation Council–has focused on the growing popularity in the area, among both governments and the wider populace, of the "positive energy" movement. 

All tastes catered for in GCC's talk show
By Emily Sharpe
All tastes catered for in GCC's talk show
The Art Newspaper March 23, 2018

GCC: GOOD MORNING GCC uses the tropes of daytime television talk shows across the Arab world, alongside references to Nam June Paik’s [satellite broadcast] Good Morning Mr. Orwell [1984], Glenn O’Brien’s [1978-82 public access television show] TV Party, Chris Burden’s commercials and other artists who have used television’s potential to communicate to a wider audience. Arab TV networks have popularised the talk show format—which ranges from political to conversational—and cover many of the topics we are addressing in our programme. They reflect the trends and interests of the region, while creating a sense of connectivity.

Chancing The Ridiculous, Jay DeFeo And Surrealism
By Clayton Press
Chancing The Ridiculous, Jay DeFeo And Surrealism
Forbes March 21, 2018

It is in the post-Rose period that DeFeo experimented with new techniques or applications, things like cameraless photography and collage. Bruce Conner, the Rat Bastard leader, had suggested that DeFeo take pictures of the “things [around her] and turn them into other stuff . . . collage things.”) As described in the exhibition’s catalog by Dana Miller, The Whitney Museum’s Director of the Collection, DeFeo’s experiments, which the artist described as play, “meant not only taking risks, but also, at key moments, sharing authorship with forces of nature, randomness, or accident.” The irony is how DeFeo would come to embrace chance after methodically working on The Rose—one work—for nearly eight years.

Hieronymus Bosch Meets Madonna’s Daughter in Jacolby Satterwhite’s Epically Trippy New Video at Gavin Brown
by Sarah Cascone
Hieronymus Bosch Meets Madonna’s Daughter in Jacolby Satterwhite’s Epically Trippy New Video at Gavin Brown
artnet news March 10, 2018

“I’m so nervous,” admitted Jacolby Satterwhite. artnet News was visiting the artist at his Brooklyn apartment ahead of the opening of his upcoming show at New York’s Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, and he was feeling some jitters. “My first solo show, no one knew who I was,” he added, noting that the pressure is way more “intense” this time around. Satterwhite’s first solo effort in the city was in 2013. “So much has happened for me since then, creatively, cerebrally, and critically. I hope of all of that comes through in what I’m showing.”

Kiki Kogelnik’s Feminist Pop Deserves Its Place in Art History
By Alina Cohen Mar 9, 2018 2:59 pm
Kiki Kogelnik’s Feminist Pop Deserves Its Place in Art History
Artsy March 9, 2018

Like other mid-century Pop artists, Kiki Kogelnik became a brand. And while the Austrian-born artist should primarily be remembered for her innovative “Hangings” series and her bold feminist motifs, history hasn’t been kind to her. In the United States, Kogelnik’s legacy unfairly rests more on her fashionable image and vibrant personality than on her work itself.

Answering Society’s Thorniest Questions, With Performance Art
By Megan O'Grady
Answering Society’s Thorniest Questions, With Performance Art
T Magazine March 2, 2018

At 62, Pope.L is inarguably the greatest performance artist of our time. This is exactly the kind of label he would find absurd, but over the course of the last four decades, no artist has so consistently broken down the accepted boundaries of the genre in order to bring it closer to the public, with lacerating, perspicacious and gloriously anti-authoritarian projects that play with our received notions of race and class and almost always cut more than one way. 

9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week
Press
9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week
ARTNEWS February 26, 2018

Featuring over 70 of the Beat generation artist’s works, “Outrageous Fortune” will showcase paintings, photographs, collages, and works on paper from Jay DeFeo’s oeuvre over the course of three decades, from 1955 to 1986. In a similar way to how the Dadaists and Surrealists invoked various symbolic emblems through unlike subjects, DeFeo’s juxtaposition of forms and mixed-media approaches messed with the role chance plays in art-making. The show will act as a teaser for New York audiences who can’t make it to Dijon, France, for a major survey of DeFeo’s work at Le Consortium.

A Woman's Point of View: UC San Diego art exhibit has work by 7 trailblazing female artists in La Jolla
by Will Bowen
A Woman's Point of View: UC San Diego art exhibit has work by 7 trailblazing female artists in La Jolla
La Jolla Light February 1, 2018

The latest show, "Stories That We Tell: Art and Identity," runs through March 3, 2018 and features the work of seven groundbreaking female artists, all of whom have been affiliated with the department over the years, but have never shown together. Eleanor Antin, Barbara Kruger, Faith Ringgold, Martha Rosler, Miriam Shapiro, Lorna Simpson and Carrie Mae Weems have created an assortment of works in varied media that explore the issues of identity, gender and race.

Prolific and Endlessly Experimental, Jay DeFeo Has Become an Icon for Artists
by Hilarie Sheets
Prolific and Endlessly Experimental, Jay DeFeo Has Become an Icon for Artists
Artsy January 30, 2018

In the career of Jay DeFeo, her astonishing painting The Rose (1958–66) casts a long shadow. Spanning almost 11 by eight feet, it has a primordial-looking surface of oil paint mixed with wood and mica so heavily built up and excavated that it weighs more than a ton. This abstract, sculptural canvas, with radiating vectors that converge at a center point, occupied DeFeo for eight years—consuming her entirely for the last five of those. The Rose acquired mythic status when the artist Bruce Conner, her close friend, filmed it being cut out of the window of DeFeo’s Fillmore Street studio in San Francisco, in 1965, then hoisted by forklift onto a truck, and transported to the Pasadena Art Museum.

Berlinische Galerie
Press
Berlinische Galerie
e-flux January 24, 2018

The exhibition was opened on the occasion of the Berlin Art Week in September 2017, and it is on view through February 26, 2018. The title of the show relates to the volume of the museum space occupied by the exhibition in relation to the volume of the artist’s body. Bonvicini, who is known for re-examining minimalism, conceptual art and institutional critique, took the gallery room as the first reference, and conceived the entire exhibition as an appropriation of the institution and its museological processes, commenting on the themes that she found outside its white cube—inclusion and barriers, subjugation and freedom.

The Estate of General Idea
Press
The Estate of General Idea
The New Yorker January 8, 2018

This show introduces viewers to the group's less well-known paintings: hard-edged, fluorescent geometric abstractions that evoke the pixelated silhouettes of eight-bit video games. They also allude to the mystical and political significance of stepped architecture in ancient societies, from Mesopotamia to the Mayans, where such structures were thought to lead to the gods. Exhibited alongside the paintings are plans for the "The 1984 Miss General Idea Pavilion," an absurdist beauty-pageant venue that, per the artists' lore, had burned to the ground, leaving only the footprint of the ziggurat. 

Brent Wadden Spins High Art With A Grounded Stance
By Dayna Mahannah
Brent Wadden Spins High Art With A Grounded Stance
BeatRoute January 8, 2018

“There is no going back into a weaving unless you unravel the whole thing,” says Brent Wadden. “So I usually just keep all the mistakes, as it’s a total pain in the ass to remove them.” With a resume of solo art exhibitions in galleries spanning from Paris, London, and Berlin to South Korea and New York, the charm of humility hasn’t been lost on the autodidactic weaver. This self-taught naïvety may just be the warp and woof of Wadden’s work.

Painting as Total Environment
by Jason Stopa
Painting as Total Environment
HYPERALLERGIC January 5, 2018

In the past few years, there has been an uptick in an expanded form of painting that presents itself as a hybrid. A few current examples of this tendency include the work of Laura Owens, Keltie Ferris, Rachel Rossin, and Trudy Benson — artists who have explored multi-media paintings that rival sculpture. These works feel constructed as opposed to made, and engage with several forms of tactility, illusion, and physical depth.

"The Estate of General Idea: Ziggurat"
By Joseph R. Wolin
"The Estate of General Idea: Ziggurat"
TimeOut January 4, 2018

The real surprise of the show is a series of paintings in the main gallery. Covered in allover patterns of interlocking ziggurats, two rectangular compositions from 1968–69 neatly combine stain painting with systemic minimalism. Nearly textbook examples of avant-garde abstract painting concerns of their day, these canvases split the difference between seriousness and burlesque.

Analyzing the Elements of Art: Four Ways to Think About Value
By KRISTIN FARR
Analyzing the Elements of Art: Four Ways to Think About Value
The New York Times January 3, 2018

Then, compare and contrast Agnes Martin’s use of contrasting color values with the work of the painter Julian Stanczak, known for his Op Art style that also boldly plays with the eye. Op Art is a type of visual art that creates optical illusions.

Editors’ Picks: 11 Things to See in New York This Week
By Sarah Cascone
Editors’ Picks: 11 Things to See in New York This Week
Artnet News January 2, 2018

Canadian art collective General Idea (1969–1994), made up of Felix Partz, Jorge Zontal, and AA Bronson, gets its first solo show at Mitchell-Innes & Nash. The exhibition highlights their use of the ziggurat motif, an architectural form common to both the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia and Mesoamerica and to modern skyscrapers.

Pope.L in conversation with Ross Simonini
Press
Pope.L in conversation with Ross Simonini
The Believer January 2018

The following interview—my second with Pope.L—was conducted through email correspondence over several months. His responses are written with the freewheeling, contradic- tory energy of his art, with both stuttered emotional reac- tions and carefully parsed explanations.

by Melissa Gronlund
Art in the UAE: the exhibitions and installations to look out for in 2018
The National January 1, 2018

In 2013, nine Khaleeji artists founded the GCC – an art collective – in the VIP room of Art Dubai, and this year they will return to their roots. The artists will transform The Room, an installation within the art fair, into a TV studio in which they will create the daytime show Good Morning GCC. This will combine segments on Arabic cooking and fair parties with art-historical references. Comprising Fatima Al Qadiri, Abdullah Al-Mutairi, Amal Khalaf, Aziz Al Qatami, Barrak Alzaid, Khalid al Gharaballi, Monira Al Qadiri, Nanu Al-Hamad and Sophia Al-Maria, the collective will examine power and economic relations in the Gulf – and how the area is perceived internationally – both mimicking and challenging stereotypes of the region’s young residents.

Brent Wadden
Press
Brent Wadden
The New Yorker December 2017

Handwoven panels of high-contrast stripes—pink and green, black and white—sewn together and mounted on canvas by the Berlin-based Canadian, split the difference between Op art and craft. In one small example, exposed seams and irregularities in the fabric create the same kind of visual stutters that another artist might achieve by painting sharp edges. Elsewhere, muted colors and diagonal lines suggest a range of allusions, from heraldry to upholstery. Wadden’s works also enlist the textures of the found and secondhand yarn that he uses: one rosy triangle, set against mixed knurls of oceanic blue and green, simultaneously brings to mind an endless beach, a scratchy couch, and the standard of a medieval army.

NEW YORK – GENERAL IDEA: “ZIGGURAT” AT MITCHELL-INNES & NASH THROUGH JANUARY 13TH, 2018
By D. Creahan
NEW YORK – GENERAL IDEA: “ZIGGURAT” AT MITCHELL-INNES & NASH THROUGH JANUARY 13TH, 2018
Art Observed December 31, 2017

Formed in Toronto in 1969 by AA Bronson, Felix Partz and Jorge Zontal, the artist collective General Idea built its body of work on a strikingly diverse array of themes, constantly revisiting both the field of contemporary art production and the identity politics of the era that ultimately underscores so much of the artist’s act of world-making, critique and expression.  No subject was safe from their intuitive and enigmatic lens, from the myth of the artist, the role of mass media, and the relationship between the body and identity, to questions of gender and sexual representation, and perhaps most famously, the HIV/AIDS activism of the 1980’s, a mode of critique that the group were pioneers of during an era of intense repression and governmental silence.  Working in a broad range of practices, from paintings to performances, published editions to video, sculpture to installation, the group was almost constantly in a state of reinvention, speaking to the diversity and power of their collective vision.

Martha Rosler: 'The struggles of our time are against the toxic masculinity of men in power'
Press
Martha Rosler: 'The struggles of our time are against the toxic masculinity of men in power'
Deutsche Welle December 25, 2017

The American artist is known for not being afraid to voice her political opinions. DW spoke to her about the state of the American Dream, the role of artists in turbulent political times and US President Donald Trump.

“I’m interested in the overall physical experience of the viewer – not just a visual experience.” Artdependence Speaks to Karl Haendel
by Dirk Vanduffel
“I’m interested in the overall physical experience of the viewer – not just a visual experience.” Artdependence Speaks to Karl Haendel
Art Dependence Magazine December 19, 2017

Born in New York in 1976, Karl Haendel currently lives and works in Los Angeles. He is known for creating meticulous, photorealistic pencil drawings, most of which are based on appropriated photographs. Haendel often works on a large scale, removing the images from their original context and playing with our relationship to familiar images, signs and signifiers.

Haendel’s work is in public collections in the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, The Museum of Modern Art, New York and the Guggenheim Museum, New York.

The 20 Most Influential Artists of 2017
Artsy
The 20 Most Influential Artists of 2017
By Artsy Editors December 15, 2017

The prevailing memory of the 2017 Whitney Biennial will likely be the outrage over Dana Schutz’s painting of Emmett Till, but it would be a shame if that overshadowed Pope.L’s strange, complicated, and typically irreverent 2017 work, Claim (Whitney Version). A large, pink-colored cube, the installation was festooned with pieces of bologna, as well as small photographic portraits of what the artist claimed were Jewish people. (“Fortified wine” was also used as a material.) The enigmatic work proves especially complex amidst the current resurgence of identity politics, and in June, it netted the artist the coveted Bucksbaum Award.

General Idea in Perspective
by Mark Bloch
General Idea in Perspective
The Brooklyn Rail December 13, 2017

The Estate of General Idea (1969-1994) had their first exhibition with the Mitchell-Innes & Nash Gallery on view in Chelsea through January 13, featuring several “ziggurat” paintings from the late 1960s, alongside works on paper, photographs and ephemera that highlight the central importance of the ziggurat form in the rich practice of General Idea.

Getty Research Institute Acquires Mary Kelly Archive
By Alex Greenberger
Getty Research Institute Acquires Mary Kelly Archive
Artnews December 13, 2017

The Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles has acquired Mary Kelly’s archive, which includes various documents related to works the American artist made between 1968 and 2014. Those documents, along with various ephemera and materials, will be catalogued by the institute and then made available to the public.

Monica Bonvicini on Her S&M-Influenced Show in Berlin, Complete with a Robotic, 33-Foot Whip
by Kate Brown
Monica Bonvicini on Her S&M-Influenced Show in Berlin, Complete with a Robotic, 33-Foot Whip
artnet December 4, 2017

Monica Bonvicini’s new exhibition at the Berlinische Galerie is an aural invasion. From most parts of the museum, the jangling buckles and leather tails of a 33-foot-long whip, titled Breathing, can be heard hitting the floor and walls. Along with the incessant slamming of a metal door, Bonvicini has crafted a jarring soundscape to house the rest of the museum’s collection of modern art from Berlin.

THE ESTATE OF GENERAL IDEA: Ziggurat
Press
THE ESTATE OF GENERAL IDEA: Ziggurat
artnet December 1, 2017

 The importance of the ziggurat to General Idea’s practice cannot be understated. It is a central and repeated symbol in General Idea’s vocabulary, appearing (either implicitly or explicitly) in paintings, drawings, performances, photographs, sculptures, prints, videos and costumes spanning the group’s existence. An ancient Mesopotamian architectural structure of steps leading up to a temple, the ziggurat symbolizes as a link between humans and the gods. The symbol can be found in cultures ranging from Mesopotamia to the Aztec to Navajo Nation. General Idea appropriates this symbol of power and theism, utilizing the form as a framing device to examine questions of branding, architecture and spatial politics. 

FRONT International: Cleveland Triennial for Contemporary Art
Press
FRONT International: Cleveland Triennial for Contemporary Art
November 29, 2017

FRONT International: Cleveland Triennial for Contemporary Art announces the opening of Press and Professional accreditation and the Triennial's initial group of project highlights, which includes FRONT commissions and exhibitions that will activate unique and unconventional spaces throughout the city of Cleveland. These projects spotlight particular sites, buildings and locations in Cleveland that carry social, cultural or political significance in its history and current reality. In these unique spaces, FRONT artists will unveil a range of projects including site-specific works that engage the city’s rich identity, while allowing a broader contemplation of people and place to both residents and visitors.

The Importance of Ziggurats - General Idea at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
by Angie Kordic
The Importance of Ziggurats - General Idea at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
Widewalls November 27, 2017

Known for their unique approach to things and their meaning, General Idea appropriated the ziggurat as the icon of power and theism, utilizing its form as a framing device to examine questions of architecture, branding and spatial politics.

For them, the ziggurat stands, among other things, as an architectural device which communicates fame, money, success. The first series of Ziggurat paintings were created in 1968-69 by Felix Partz, but the group didn’t return to them until 1986, completing the sketches from the previous period that were never completed.

A Trio of Political Photographs Rendered in Lint
by Elena Goukassian
A Trio of Political Photographs Rendered in Lint
HYPERALLERGIC November 20, 2017

For 12 years, Kelly collected lint from her dryer to make the works, each of which is about ten feet wide. A “light noise” projected on each one appears as a kind of TV static, giving the illusion of movement while providing a nod to the historiographical importance of these three very specific moments in time, made universal by collective memory.

Hidden Histories: Mary Kelly: The Practical Past
by Jessica Holmes
Hidden Histories: Mary Kelly: The Practical Past
BOMB November 15, 2017

Kelly’s work first gained her both renown and notoriety in the 1970s as she made and expanded upon her Post-Partum Document (1973–79), a project that found her meticulously chronicling the first six years of her son’s life. The work was both an intimate record of a new mother’s unfolding relationship with her baby and an exacting account of the minutiae of childrearing that was, at the time (and still is), primarily a woman’s domain. Through Post-Partum Document, Kelly analyzed and exhibited everything from the child’s language development to the stains left behind in his diapers, revealing the (unpaid) labor, at once tedious and intense, that makes up much of so-called “women’s work.”

Mary Kelly
Press
Mary Kelly
The New Yorker November 15, 2017

Three recent series by the veteran Conceptualist unite the personal and the historical using an unexpected domestic material: compressed dryer lint. “7 Days” re-creates covers of a defunct leftist publication; the jumble of early-nineteen-seventies headlines—“Germaine Greer Talks,” “Miners on Strike”—suggests a spin cycle of history.

Leigh Ledare film premiere at the Art Institute is both awful and spellbinding
by Lori Waxman
Leigh Ledare film premiere at the Art Institute is both awful and spellbinding
Chicago Tribune November 9, 2017

The show premieres a film called “The Task,” plus a related installation. “The Task” runs two hours and presents the results of a three-day group relations conference organized by Ledare in Chicago this past spring. It owes its name and structure to the Tavistock Method, an approach pioneered by the British psychoanalyst Wilfred R. Bion, who in the late 1940s began to experiment with the notion that groups are greater than the sum of their parts. The task of a conference is to study group structures by studying itself: how authority is invested in leaders by others, the covert processes in operation, the problems encountered.

Artworks from Two Museums Share a Space, But Not a Conversation
by Seph Rodney
Artworks from Two Museums Share a Space, But Not a Conversation
HYPERALLERGIC November 8, 2017

But there is a juxtaposition in the exhibition that saves me from the disappointment I’m left with, where Pope L. has interjected one of his text pieces. Most of these pieces by Pope L. are displayed in the entranceways between galleries, and they felt too editorial for me, like comments in the comment section of an online article. 

Post-Truth Detroit
by Wendy Vogel
Post-Truth Detroit
Frieze November 8, 2017

Detroit and its surrounding areas present a case study in urban decline – one that has spurred many artists to work directly with local communities. In Flint, Michigan, for example – a once-thriving industrial city and now a symbol of post-industrial neglect and government corruption – an ongoing crisis over contaminated water has prompted several artist responses.

Mary Kelly
By Ramsay Kolber
Mary Kelly
Osmos November 7, 2017

I had originally developed the lint medium to deal with war crimes. Over time, I thought perhaps it is also suitable for or evocative of the idea of historical memory, and maybe I can make an image, even though I don't generall work with images. 

‘Ziggurat’ Paintings At Mitchell Innes & Nash, New York
Press
‘Ziggurat’ Paintings At Mitchell Innes & Nash, New York
BLOUINARTINFO November 6, 2017

The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog with an interview between AA Bronson and Hans Ulrich Obrist. Formed in Toronto in 1969 by AA Bronson, Felix Partz and Jorge Zontal, General Idea is recognized internationally for work that concerns subjects as the myth of the artist, the relationship between the body and identity, the role of mass media, issues of gender and sexual representation, and famously HIV/AIDS activism at a time when even talking about it was a taboo.

Mary Kelly at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
By Kaelen Wilson-Goldie
Mary Kelly at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
Artforum November 2017

This exhibition, titled “The Practical Past,” is a reminder that Kelly’s work is fundamentally useful and that Post-Partum Document proposed new motherhood and early childhood as firsts in a long series of traumas, extending to the world of political upheavals, to ‪the promise and failure of revolutions past and present.

Amanda Ross-Ho
by Elizabeth Buhe
Amanda Ross-Ho
Art in America November 1, 2017

The exhibition also included six aluminum sculptures of clock hands hung near the gallery's entrance and, in the center of the space, two broad white tables covered with all manner of paraphernalia one might find in a studio, or in a carry-on bag: coins, X-Acto knife blades, scrunchies, gloves, wine glasses, and sleep masks. As she had done in previous work, Ross-Ho played with scale in this arrangement by including exaggeratedly large or miniaturized versions of some of the objects, such as jumbo paper clips and tiny beverage bottles. 

The Politics of Adversity in Pope.L’s Flint Water Project
by Natalie Haddad
The Politics of Adversity in Pope.L’s Flint Water Project
HYPERALLERGIC October 28, 2017

Flint Water Project, supported by the Knight Foundation as part of the Knight Arts Challenge and a Kickstarter campaign, came about when What Pipeline invited Pope.L to create a project in Detroit. The Kickstarter page states, “When Pope.L was asked by What Pipeline to do a commission for Detroit, he felt that whatever he did it should not re-victimize the city as had been done too often in the past. What if Detroit could be the hero and come to the rescue of another Midwest city in need?”

Eddie Martinez Opens His First Museum Show At The Davis Museum
by Ann Binlot
Eddie Martinez Opens His First Museum Show At The Davis Museum
Forbes October 27, 2017

The exhibition, titled Ants at a Picknic, which is on view until December 17, 2017, includes a series of new, frenetic large-scale mandala paintings, 17 tabletop painted bronze sculptures and drawings on paper. “The works in Ants at a Picknic make plain that Martinez has hit his stride,” said Dr. Lisa Fischman, Ruth Gordon Shapiro ’37 director of the Davis Museum and curator of the exhibition. “The cosmic hooks, the summoning of spirits, the virtuoso line, the command of color and composition — it all adds up to its own kind of brilliance.”

At the Rose and Davis museums, in between representation and abstraction
By Cate McQuaid
At the Rose and Davis museums, in between representation and abstraction
The Boston Globe October 27, 2017

Martinez doodles with a Sharpie, then blows up the sketch. The muscularity of his lines echoes his experience as a graffiti artist, and he walks a path between drawing and painting pioneered by Cy Twombly.

The black lines retain the doodle’s nonchalance, but the scale raises the stakes. Martinez fills in, paints over and around with self-effacing colors like avocado green and wan tomato red. He sprays, dabs, smudges and presses paint — his textures agitate, as do his rough, jagged lines. He tacks on bits of cloth. His signature, a bold “EM,” is part of the spiraling game board, too. 

Visualizing Historicism: Mary Kelly’s Personal Reckoning
by Marjorie Welish
Visualizing Historicism: Mary Kelly’s Personal Reckoning
artcritical October 27, 2017

“The Practical Past” is a memoir from the artist’s current perspective on her life in the collective spheres she inhabited in the 1960s and ‘70s and their relation to events before and since. Much of this is writing made visual through letters from that time reflecting concerns and worries about how to live the engaged feminist life, These are transposed in digital projections that nonetheless reflect Kelly’s decision to do a kind of cottage-industry piecework.  In a slightly mismatched gridded array, the overall text of handwritten correspondence renders originals as multiple iterations. What appears to shade and fade into historicism is also stuff.

Eddie Martinez: Studio Wall
Press
Eddie Martinez: Studio Wall
Time Out New York October 2017

Known for colorful paintings that recall midcentury abstraction, Martinez is plastering the Drawing Center with thousands of sketches that he will change throughout the exhibition’s run, a gesture that mimics his practice of keeping a wall in his studio reserved for drawings and studies. The show also includes paintings and large works on paper.  

Four Drawing Shows to See Now
By Andrea K. Scott
Four Drawing Shows to See Now
The New Yorker October 25, 2017

There are about two thousand drawings all told, from idle doodles to sketches for paintings, and the cumulative, very happy effect is of being inside the artist’s brain. The Surrealist technique of automatic drawing meets the chutzpah of a hand that’s been known to tag walls with spray paint. Martinez has been swapping in new works as the show goes along, upping the ante on drawing from life—this is drawing as living.

Art Lurks in an Unlikely Place for Mary Kelly: the Dryer
By JORI FINKEL
Art Lurks in an Unlikely Place for Mary Kelly: the Dryer
The New York Times October 21, 2017

There is a peculiar, almost shameful, pleasure in visiting Mary Kelly’s laundry room. A pioneer of conceptual art, she is a model of precision in many ways. Her thinking is rigorous, her speech is eloquent, and her small home and studio up in the hills are sparsely and beautifully furnished with choice midcentury pieces.

A Must-Read Interview (and an Exhibit) on Women in the Arts
by Sarah Moroz
A Must-Read Interview (and an Exhibit) on Women in the Arts
The Cut October 20, 2017

Artists featured in “Women House” span continents and generations, including Martha Rosler, Claude Cahun, Zanele Muholi, Nazgol Ansarinia, Joana Vasconcelos, Cindy Sherman, and Laurie Simmons. Their work transforms domestic space into a public forum, entwines the female body within architectural design, and explores notions of exile and confinement in socio-spatial terms.

Pope.L’s Conceptual Bottled Water Project Calls Attention to the Crisis in Flint
By Sarah Rose Sharp
Pope.L’s Conceptual Bottled Water Project Calls Attention to the Crisis in Flint
HYPERALLERGIC October 17, 2017
Amanda Ross-Ho
BY DAN FOX
Amanda Ross-Ho
Frieze October 17, 2017

‘Even a stopped clock gives the right time twice a day.’ That stoner koan from the 1987 comedy Withnail & I floated into my mind while looking at Amanda Ross-Ho’s solo show at Mitchell Innes & Nash. Twelve large clock faces, scrawled with colourful brush-marks, and pencilled notes-to-self, line the walls. The dials are missing their hands. These are hung in a forlorn line, each set to half-past six, near the entrance to the show. If the clock faces tell us that time is one subject of Ross-Ho’s show, then the dirty, outsized wine glasses, cups, forks, art materials and tools scattered across two big tables in the centre of the gallery tell us that scale is her other topic.

Defying Time and Play-Acting Glamour With AA Bronson
By Emily McDermott
Defying Time and Play-Acting Glamour With AA Bronson
SLEEK October 2017

This summer and autumn, General Idea has posthumous exhibitions at MAMCO, Geneva’s museum of contemporary art, and Mitchell-Innes & Nash in New York. Next spring, Esther Schipper and KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin will showcase works by Bronson and his collective, as well those created under his pseudonym ‘JX Williams’. Outside of the gallery and institutional sphere, Bronson is compiling the group’s catalogue raisonné with Fern Bayer and developing a performance project at the Siksika Nation Aboriginal reserve in Canada.

AMANDA ROSS-HO: “MY PEN IS HUGE” AT MITCHELL-INNES & NASH THROUGH OCTOBER 14TH, 2017
By J. Garcia
AMANDA ROSS-HO: “MY PEN IS HUGE” AT MITCHELL-INNES & NASH THROUGH OCTOBER 14TH, 2017
Art Observed October 12, 2017

In some regards, size has always mattered to Amanda Ross-Ho. It’s hard to even recall a show of hers in which she hasn’t taken a common object and enlarged it to an uncommon size. In her 2012 show at MOCA’s Pacific Design Center, Teeny Tiny Woman, Ross-Ho even went so far as to create an oversize photo enlarger, underscoring her impressive sense of both scale and formal wit. With several years of practice under her belt since then, however, Ross-Ho’s simple enlargements have seemed to evolve quite considerably, perhaps best exemplified by My Pen is Huge, Ross-Ho’s new exhibition at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, which sees her adding to own work’s discourse by including life size objects alongside her oversized sculptures.

Editors’ Picks: 18 Things to See in New York This Week
By Sarah Cascone
Editors’ Picks: 18 Things to See in New York This Week
Artnet News October 10, 2017

“Eddie Martinez: Studio Wall” at the Drawing Center
Painter Eddie Martinez is never without pen and paper, drawing as he goes about his day and hanging the resulting drawings—created on the subway, at doctors’ appointments, and even at restaurants—on a wall in his Brooklyn studio. The artist will recreate this wall of artwork at Drawing Center, adding new pieces for the duration of the exhibition.

Selling Flint's water? Art installation raises funds and awareness for Flint, Detroit water victims
By MATTHEW PIPER
Selling Flint's water? Art installation raises funds and awareness for Flint, Detroit water victims
Model D October 10, 2017

And yet, the "Flint Water Project" cannot be separated from the potential impact it may have outside of the gallery or the homes of individual collectors. Three years after it became widely known, the Flint water crisis is, after all, ongoing, and the human costs are all too real. (The water being bottled and sold at What Pipeline comes from the home of Flint resident Tiantha Williams, whose young son was born prematurely due to complications from her consumption of Flint water during pregnancy.) 

AMANDA ROSS-HO: My Pen is Huge
by Hovey Brock
AMANDA ROSS-HO: My Pen is Huge
Brooklyn Rail October 5, 2017

Los Angeles-based artist Amanda Ross-Ho has built a career focusing on the studio as locus, metaphor, and container for the creative process. Keeping her interests tethered to this line of inquiry has given her the freedom to cover a swath of art practices including sculpture, painting, photography, installation, and performance. In MY PEN IS HUGE, she gives us a book of hours aimed not at religious devotion but rather devotion to creativity, parsed into minute snippets of time.

For Amanda Ross-Ho, Losing Her Studio Was a Creative Gain
BY SCOTT INDRISEK
For Amanda Ross-Ho, Losing Her Studio Was a Creative Gain
Artsy October 3,2 017

“MY PEN IS HUGE” was absolutely perfect as a title because it did about 15 things at the same time. Language has this ability to do what I want my work to always be able to do, which is to have an elasticity and mutability. I loved the redundancy of naming what was actually happening in the show—which is about scaling my own mark-making larger. Also it’s obviously a piece of wordplay that’s supposed to fool you, this quick joke. And then it’s specifically about male arrogance, and the fallibility of it.

Goings On About Town
Press
Goings On About Town
The New Yorker October 2017

Last summer, around the time she lost the lease on her downtown-Los Angeles studio of nearly a decade, Ross-Ho found a collection of paper clock faces being unloaded by their manufacturer on eBay. These handless invocations of disorientation and eternity became her work surfaces and scratch pads until this past August, which she spent in the gallery painstakingly reproducing them as four-and-a-half-foot-square paintings. One is covered with doodled cubes, masks of tragedy, and hasty ballpoint notes like “Avoid grinding over steaming pots”; in another, the clock face is simply painted red. Along with an installation of novelty-sized objects both store-bought and custom-made—giant wineglasses, minuscule bottles of Evian water—the work suggests a powerfully unnerving vision of time as a procession of banal decisions adding up to something irrevocable. Six sets of large powder-coated clock hands hanging on the front wall make a fitting addendum.

Kara Walker, Amanda Ross-Ho, Tom Friedman, and More: The Fall Gallery Season Kicks Off
By Rema Hort
Kara Walker, Amanda Ross-Ho, Tom Friedman, and More: The Fall Gallery Season Kicks Off
Whitewall September 21, 2017

Amanda Ross-Ho’s show, “My Pen is Huge,” is like jumping through a rabbit hole and into a world where the gallery, Mitchell-Innes & Nash, has become a mad theater. The oversized wine glasses, blown-up hands of grandfather clocks, and other random objects are feel somehow completely necessary in the room. Coffee stains and pen scribbles cover the canvas and tables in the middle of the gallery. This show completely captures chaos in its most whimsical form.

Your Concise New York Art Guide for Fall 2017
By Jillian Steinhauer, Benjamin Sutton and Elisa Wouk Almino
Your Concise New York Art Guide for Fall 2017
Hyperallergic September 19, 2017

We’re pretty excited about this one, as it’s General Idea’s first solo show in New York City since an exhibition at MoMA in 1996. Founded by AA Bronson, Felix Partz, and Jorge Zontal in Toronto in 1969, the collective has consistently tackled taboo subjects, especially pertaining to sexuality. This exhibition will focus on the group’s tamer but still visually grabbing Ziggurat Paintings, which were made between 1968–86 and play with the ancient Mesopotamian form.

On the Clock with Amanda Ross-Ho
By John Yau
On the Clock with Amanda Ross-Ho
BOMB Magazine September 15, 2017

In the weeks leading up to her current exhibition, MY PEN IS HUGE, at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, Amanda Ross-Ho prepared for the show in the gallery space in which her work would be on display. Poet and art writer John Yau visited her during this process.

The 15th Istanbul Biennial: What To Expect
BY Katrina Kufer
The 15th Istanbul Biennial: What To Expect
Harber's Bazaar Arabia September 13, 2017

Monica Bonvicini’s homage to Louise Bourgeois will be some of the surprises among many others

‘My Pen is Huge’ by Amanda Ross-Ho at Mitchell-Innes & Nash Gallery, New York
BY BLOUIN ARTINFO
‘My Pen is Huge’ by Amanda Ross-Ho at Mitchell-Innes & Nash Gallery, New York
Blouin ArtInfo September 12, 2017

In an exhibition created within the walls of its display place, Los Angeles-based artist Amanda Ross-Ho installs (and creates) her latest exhibits at the Mitchell-Innes & Nash Gallery in New York. This hyperbole heavy exhibition, consisting of installations, sculptures and paintings, is called ‘MY PEN IS HUGE’.

Out of Site
By Paul Laster
Out of Site
Time Out New York September 6 – 12, 2017

A conceptual artist known for incorporating her studio activities in a theatrical, multidisciplinary practice, Los Angeles artist Amanda Ross-Ho created her latest exhibit, titled "MY PEN IS HUGE," right in Chelsea's Mitchell-Innes & Nash gallery. 

'Pink Cup and The Facts' By Karl Haendel & Jay DeFeo at Mitchell-Innes & Nash Gallery, New York
Press
'Pink Cup and The Facts' By Karl Haendel & Jay DeFeo at Mitchell-Innes & Nash Gallery, New York
Blouin ArtInfo September 11, 2017

This will be the gallery’s second exhibition of these artists and the first time the two will be exhibited together. The exhibition showcases the relation between the works of the artists which are based on the process of making drawings.

Here Is Every Single New York Gallery Show That You Need to (Somehow) See This September
By Sarah Cascone
Here Is Every Single New York Gallery Show That You Need to (Somehow) See This September
artnet news September 7, 2017

Los Angeles-based artist Amanda Ross-Ho turned Mitchell-Innes & Nash into her studio for the month of August, working in the gallery to create new paintings and sculptures for her upcoming exhibition. The central motif will be the clock, featured in 12 large-scale paintings made last month based on drawings produced over the past year—compressing a year’s worth of work into just 31 days.

Here Are the 8 Things You Should Seek Out During Berlin Art Week 2017
Press
Here Are the 8 Things You Should Seek Out During Berlin Art Week 2017
Artnet News September 4, 2017

For her solo presentation at the Berlinische Galerie, Monica Bonvicini has produced a site-specific installation to be staged in the museum’s large exhibition hall—a move that is a hallmark of her decades-long practice, which often focuses on the institutional viewing space. Because the Berlin exhibition runs in tandem with the 15th Istanbul Biennale, in which Bonvicini is also participating, the show is influenced by both Berlin and Istanbul, and is said to feature elements of each major city.

The 15 New York Shows You Need to See This September
BY SCOTT INDRISEK
The 15 New York Shows You Need to See This September
Artsy August 30, 2017

“I decided to use these surfaces as a place to record the relentless conscious, and subconscious, mark-making and stenography that takes place within my immediate and intimate personal tabletop spaces.” While working within her impromptu gallery-studio, Ross-Ho says she is “forensically translating” some of these studies into a dozen large-scale paintings. 

12 Habits of Highly Effective Artists, From Creative Exercise to Living in Airplane Mode
By Rachel Corbett
12 Habits of Highly Effective Artists, From Creative Exercise to Living in Airplane Mode
Artnet news August 22, 2017

Martha Rosler calls it the “third-space effect”—a work environment so controlled that the “world shrinks to a bubble around myself, without the distractions of my daily life or environment or people.” One place she has this feeling is in airports. “I wrote one of my most-cited essays largely at the Atlanta airport way back in 1980 or ’81. I have often found myself able to concentrate in airports, but only if the waiting area isn’t packed, or if I can sit in a place that has tables,” she says.

William Pope.L: Proto Skin Set
By Alan Gilbert
William Pope.L: Proto Skin Set
The Brooklyn Rail July 14, 2017

From his earliest works made as an undergraduate, which include fiction, plays, song lyrics, etc., that were retroactively organized under the title Communications Devices, Pope.L has wrestled with language as communication, while illustrating a profound understanding that language is not a transparent medium. Neither is race, however often it’s looked through. Instead, Pope.L makes the surfaces of his work murky and obdurate, highlighting their visibility while also obscuring them. 

They Know Why You Fly: Martha Rosler on Her Airport Photographs
By Anne Doran
They Know Why You Fly: Martha Rosler on Her Airport Photographs
Artnews August 15, 2017

Since the early 1970s, through her photomontages, photographs, videos, installations, and critical writings, Martha Rosler has explored what mass-media images and public spaces reveal about power and persuasion in late capitalist society. “In the Place of the Public: The Airport Series,” her photographic exploration of the airport as postmodern space, dates from 1983 to the present. While Rosler has not changed the focus of the series, which remains on the airports’ interior architecture, she has changed the photographs’ accompanying text to reflect alterations in how airports are designed and utilized post-9/11. Earlier this year, she talked with ARTnews about the evolution of the series

Pope.L to Bottle Contaminated Flint Water and Sell It in Detroit
Press
Pope.L to Bottle Contaminated Flint Water and Sell It in Detroit
Artforum August 9, 2017

Chicago-based artist Pope.L, who recently won the 2017 Bucksbaum Award for his work in this year’s Whitney Biennial, is raising funds on Kickstarter for an interventionist installation and performance piece that calls attention to the water crisis in Flint, Michigan. For Flint Water Project, the artist will purchase and bottle 150 gallons of polluted water from Flint residents. He will then sell the bottles as limited edition artworks in Detroit.

Pope.L Is Raising Funds to Bottle, Sell Flint Water
By Andrew Russeth
Pope.L Is Raising Funds to Bottle, Sell Flint Water
Artnews August 8, 2017

“When Pope.L was asked by What Pipeline to do a commission for Detroit,” the Kickstarter proposal reads, “he felt that whatever he did it should not re-victimize the city as had been done too often in the past. What if Detroit could be the hero and come to the rescue of another midwest city in need?” It adds, at another point, “The goals for his work are several: joy, money, and uncertainty—not necessarily in that order.”

Conversations: Kiki Kogelnik “Inner Life” at Kunsthall Stavanger
Hanne Mugaas and Martin Clark in conversation
Conversations: Kiki Kogelnik “Inner Life” at Kunsthall Stavanger
Mousse Magazine August, 2017

I’ve chosen to focus primarily on works Kogelnik produced in the 1960s and 1970s. I find her preoccupation with technology, new materials, and body politics during that period way ahead of its time. I became really fascinated with her cyborgian works, such as Plug-in Hand (ca. 1967) and Human Spare Part (ca. 1968), both polyurethane hand sculptures with technologies embedded—a telephone handle and an electrical plug—as well as the vinyl Hangings, which allude to a future where bodies can be taken on and off.

Kelley Walker and General Idea at MAMCO, Geneva
Press
Kelley Walker and General Idea at MAMCO, Geneva
Mousse Magazine August 1, 2017

Stemming from the group’s archives, the exhibition at MAMCO, conceived in close collaboration with AA Bronson, tackles the first ten years of their career under the specific angle of photography. The aesthetics of these early works borrows from Minimal, Conceptual, as well as Land art, and the regulars from MAMCO will certainly find an echo to works from Dennis Oppenheim, Franz Erhard Walther, or even Victor Burgin. However these photographs are also documents from the group’s life within the context of communitarian utopias which left their mark on the 1960s in Northern America.

'MY PEN IS HUGE' by Amanda Ross-Ho at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York
by Blouin ArtInfo
'MY PEN IS HUGE' by Amanda Ross-Ho at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York
Blouin Art Info July 30, 2017

In summer 2016, Ross-Ho found a collection of vintage paper clock face dials on Ebay, being liquidated from a clock maker. She acquired all of them, identifying the poetic potential and a vacant stage for activity on the blank clock faces, which were amputated from the mechanism and components, she started a series of works that evolved across her travels. She aggregated the surfaces of the clock faces with doodles, calculations, diagrams, lists, notes to self and other anxious scribblings, combined with the residue of her consumption of food and drink, as a visual documentation of her daily activities of life and art.

How Modern was Grandma Moses
By Cate McQuaid
How Modern was Grandma Moses
Boston Globe July 20, 2017

It’s an ironic development. Anna Mary Robertson Moses was the biggest American artist of the 20th century, thanks in part to her swimmingly successful “Grandma” brand, which headlined down-home paintings that translated well onto aprons, lampshades, and Hallmark cards. But time passes and brands calcify, even if the art remains alive and juicy. 

Monica Bonvicini at Gerhardsen Gerner, Oslo
By Blouin ArtInfo
Monica Bonvicini at Gerhardsen Gerner, Oslo
Blouin ArtInfo July 19, 2017

Since the 1990s, Bonvicini’s works have circled around the world of construction. Industrial materials, tools, and construction site supplies have been used and transformed into large installations or sculptures. She reveals the close connections between architecture and public spaces, the world of labor, gender and sexuality, as well as control, politics, power and representation. In Bonvicini’s eyes, buildings as well as urban and suburban infrastructure are by no means neutral, but on the contrary obsessive, politically ideological, and sexualized. 

Carnegie and Studio Museum in Harlem share a vision in new '20/20' exhibition
By M. Thomas
Carnegie and Studio Museum in Harlem share a vision in new '20/20' exhibition
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette July 16, 2017

When the curators began organizing “20/20: The Studio Museum in Harlem and Carnegie Museum of Art,” Barack Obama was still president. “It’s very interesting how things shifted over the course of planning the exhibition,” Mr. Crosby said. As they structured the show, they made changes in response to “the polarized political landscape we find ourselves in.” 

Kiki Kogelnik’s Feminist Pop Deserves Its Place in Art History
Press
Kiki Kogelnik’s Feminist Pop Deserves Its Place in Art History
Wall Street International Magazine July 15, 2017

Kiki Kogelnik, who passed away almost exactly twenty years ago, on February 1st 1997, staged her artificial appearance as part of a complex artistic overall strategy that focussed on the inseparable connection of life and art. Quite naturally, the multifaceted, versatile artist attached the same importance to the performative “self imaging“ and “self fashioning“ as to her artistic work, which explicitly cannot be reduced to disciplines and categories. “Kiki is an original. Her style is part bohemian, part film star, part intellectual” Robert Fulford stated in the “Toronto Daily Star“ in 1964.

'Patterns Bigger Than Any of Us' at Ben Maltz Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design, Los Angeles
by Blouin ArtInfo
'Patterns Bigger Than Any of Us' at Ben Maltz Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design, Los Angeles
Blouin ArtInfo July 4, 2017

The works on display raises questions about the self in relation to others, collective norms, and the built environment. Through their distinct process and subject matter, each artist points out the links and fissures in our lives and the larger systems that we attempt to grapple with from science to spirituality and spaces in between. O’Neill’s two-channel projection environment, ‘No Wonder - Two Skins’ (2013) and Fleming’s multichannel video installation, ‘A Theory of Everything’ (2015) creates a chronological bridge between the works, suggesting a comparison of American society of the past and present. Both artists use found collage and original to create new stories that are devoid of a straight narrative and cinematic convention.

Highlights from Documenta 14
Press
Highlights from Documenta 14
Modern Painters June/July 2017

For this performance piece that will run 24 hours a day for the entire course of the exhibition, artist Pope.L enlisted performers to wander around both Athens and Kassel whispering fictional texts penned by the artist, randomly generated series of numbers, and folk songs from the 1930s to themselves while publish audio speakers in both cities play similar content. 

The Expansive Provocateur Pope.L, in Smaller, Potent Doses
by Roberta Smith
The Expansive Provocateur Pope.L, in Smaller, Potent Doses
The New York Times June 29, 2017

The esteemed multidisciplinary artist Pope.L is having a moment. His contribution to Documenta 14, the prestigious international exhibition in Kassel, Germany — and this year also in Athens — is the slyly subversive “Whispering Campaign,” featuring performers who walk the streets of both cities, confiding in strangers the artist’s elliptical yet biting aphorisms about race and color from his word- based “Skin Set” drawings. Last month, Pope.L’s “Claim (Whitney Version),” a beautiful vexing installation featuring an enormous pastel-colored room festooned with slices of baloney, received the Bucksbaum Award as a “boundary-breaking” work in the recent Whitney Biennial. 

Goings On About Town
Press
Goings On About Town
The New Yorker June 2017

The conceptual artist, who was recently awarded the Bucksbaum Prize for his piece in the Whitney Biennial, is best known for confrontationally absurdist public performances. But this show of early work highlights his gift for combining text, found imagery, and evocative materials. In some of his assemblages, smeared peanut butter, like impasto pigment, frames magazine clippings, such as one that reads “Now You Can Bring Black History Home” and features a photo of African-American schoolchildren reciting the Pledge of Allegiance. In the sardonic, Rauschenbergian “Crawling to Richard Pryor’s House,” from 1994, a froglike, brown stuffed animal, sandwiched by paint and wood glue on a board, also bears a fragmentary, appropriated image of a child. Pope.L has a knack for drawing out the scatological qualities of gestural painting, the abject potential of collage, and the rhetorical power of color to expose the psychosexual substrate of American racism.

'Invisible Man' Inspires Conceptual Art About Blackness
By ANTWAUN SARGENT
'Invisible Man' Inspires Conceptual Art About Blackness
Creators June 21, 2017

Pope.L's installation Pedestal, a Elkay drinking fountain deconstructed and hung from the ceiling, alludes to the segregated black and white drinking fountains installed throughout the South during Jim Crow. The work releases water into a hole in the gallery's floor every two-and-a-half minutes. The gesture alludes to Pope.L's "Hole Theory." In a book titled after the theory, the artist writes, "Hole Theory engages lack/Across economic and cultural/And political boundaries/[Lack is where it's AT]." Pope.L's theory is rooted in the social conditions of 1980s black life, the drugs that flooded the community, the jobs that left it, and the culture, like Hip-hop, that sprung from the era's black rage.

Surprises and Innovations Abound at Art Basel
By LOUIS LUCERO II
Surprises and Innovations Abound at Art Basel
The New York Times June 15, 2017

To wit: For the new work of the Los Angeles-based artist Amanda Ross-Ho, “Untitled Findings (ACCESS),” she has scattered enlarged replicas of keys across Basel.

Ms. Ross-Ho’s exaggerated keys, modeled after functioning ones that open doors to real locations around the city, are almost certain to be come across by passers-by who had no expectation of a run-in with an Art Basel installation that day — chance encounters echoing the imagined accidents by which the keys were lost.

Mitchell-Innes & Nash Now Represents the Estate of General Idea
By Alex Greenberger
Mitchell-Innes & Nash Now Represents the Estate of General Idea
ARTnews June 13, 2017

“They reinvented the idea of artist activism,” Lucy Mitchell-Inness, a co-owner of the gallery, told ARTnews. “They took on ideas—those often demonized or ignored—with a boldness that was unheard of at the time. [General Idea] came of age in a period that saw pivotal changes in queer conceptualism and postmodernism. They led the charge in decentralization and intervention within the institutional framework.”

In pictures: new art cross old Basel
by Hannah McGivern
In pictures: new art cross old Basel
The Art Newspaper June 13, 2017

“I’ve been a big fan of Amanda Ross-Ho’s work for a long time. She makes large-scale sculptural interpretations of everyday objects, like gloves and trousers. In this vein, she’s made a keychain based on her own Carabiner keychain and a bunch of keys that seem to have fallen off and are lost throughout the streets of Basel. They’re large—maybe 60cm long. We partnered with people from the Parcours area and asked if they would You might find one down by the river, up the stairway on the other side of the road, in a private garden. give the artist a copy of their key. It makes a nice meta-portrait of the local community.” 

What is the market for Documenta 14 artists?
by Julia Michalska
What is the market for Documenta 14 artists?
The Art Newspaper June 13, 2017

“The visibility you get through Documenta, you can’t get anywhere else,” says Sven Christian Schuch of Galerie Sfeir-Semler, which is showing collages by the Lebanese- Dutch artist Mounira Al Solh at Art Basel. But a “quick sell” is not what the gallery is expecting, he says. Instead, he hopes that the institutional attention generated by Documenta could help to secure a possible future solo show for Al Solh. But the artist’s “moderate prices” can make this fair strategy a risk. “Every centimetre on the walls is very expensive,” Schuch says. 

How Do You Conserve Art Made of Bologna, or Bubble Gum, or Soap?
by Jacoba Urist
How Do You Conserve Art Made of Bologna, or Bubble Gum, or Soap?
The Atlantic June 9, 2017

But among the questions it presents, Claim, more than other artwork in the Biennial, stresses the unique problems museums and collectors face as contemporary art grows more ambitious in its materials: how to conserve works made of substances meant to last for several days or weeks. After all, it’s difficult to imagine bologna portraits transcending millennia like a classical marble bust or centuries like a Rembrandt. Getting a sculpture made of deli meat to survive the decade could even be a stretch. While Claim may be an extreme case of perishable art, Pope L. is far from alone.  

15 Documenta Artists with Staying Power
by Alexander Forbes
15 Documenta Artists with Staying Power
Artsy June 9, 1017

Walk through Kassel for long enough (which you certainly will if you come to to this sprawling exhibition) and you’ll find yourself spinning around at least once looking for the source of a disembodied voice. It’s most likely not a monster from the Kassel-born Brothers Grimm haunting the city, but instead a work by Whitney Biennial and now documenta favorite Pope.L. 

Careful Whisper: Pope.L Discusses His Documenta Sound Work, Hidden Across Kassel
By Nate Freeman
Careful Whisper: Pope.L Discusses His Documenta Sound Work, Hidden Across Kassel
ARTnews June 8, 2017

“It’s a really large enterprise, and this go-around it’s even more difficult to encompass,” Pope.L, who shows at Mitchell-Innes & Nash in New York, said while sitting next to me at L’Osteria’s zinc bar with free pistachios. “But I’ve been making works for the past ten years, maybe longer, where my intent is to make something that even I can’t encompass myself. So it felt perfectly within that agenda.

Pope.L wins 2017 Whitney Museum Bucksbaum Award
Press
Pope.L wins 2017 Whitney Museum Bucksbaum Award
Apollo June 5, 2017

Pope.L wins 2017 Whitney Museum Bucksbaum Award | Chicago-based artist Pope.L is the 2017 winner of the Whitney Museum’s annual Bucksbaum Award. The $100,000 prize goes to Pope.L, also known as William Pope.L, for his contribution to this year’s Whitney Biennial: Claim (Whitney Version) (2017), an installation containing 2,755 slices of bologna.

Pope.L Wins Whitney Museum’s $100,000 Bucksbaum Award
By Alex Greenberger
Pope.L Wins Whitney Museum’s $100,000 Bucksbaum Award
ArtNews June 2, 2017

“The Bucksbaum Award recognizes extraordinary artists whose works are inventive, urgent, and promise to be enduring,” Mary E. Bucksbaum Scanlan—the daughter of the prize’s namesake, Melva Bucksbaum, who died in 2015—said in a statement. “I am proud that this tradition continues with the first Biennial in the Whitney’s downtown home by honoring Pope.L, a singular artist in a class of his own.”

William Pope.L Wins 2017 Bucksbaum Award
Press
William Pope.L Wins 2017 Bucksbaum Award
Artforum June 2, 2017

The multidisciplinary artist Pope.L (also known as William Pope.L) has been named the recipient of the 2017 Bucksbaum Award, which recognizes an artist whose work was featured in the recent Whitney Biennial. Previous winners include Sarah Michelson and Zoe Leonard.

Mitchell-Innes and Nash Salutes The Art of Julian Stanczak
by Phillip Barcio
Mitchell-Innes and Nash Salutes The Art of Julian Stanczak
Ideel Art June 1, 2017

The painter Julian Stanczak died earlier this year in his hometown of Cleveland Ohio, at the age of 88. Prior to his death, Mitchell-Innes and Nash in New York had been planning what would have been the second solo exhibition at the gallery of his work. That exhibition opened on 18 May, less than two months after Stanczak passed, and it has became more than just another show. It is a celebration of the work and the life of a truly beloved and influential artist.

Overview: The National Exhibition
by Brian Droitcour
Overview: The National Exhibition
Art in America June 1, 2017

Leigh Ledare shot his 16mm film Vokzal (2016) in a square where the presence of three railway stations creates unusual patterns of foot traffic: neither linear, like that directed by sidewalks, nor ambling, as in a park, but combining multiple directions of strolling in an open space with multiple, specific destinations. Ledare would train his lens on particular pedestrians and follow them until they exited the range of his view...Like Ledare’s film, Pope.L’s work begins with surreptitious camerawork in public space, but the rigid ordering and smell of rotting lunchmeat suggest something less exploratory and more sinister. 

What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week | Pope.L at Martos Gallery
By WILL HEINRICH
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week | Pope.L at Martos Gallery
The New York Times May 25, 2017

Every two-and-a-half minutes exactly, Pope.L’s “Pedestal,” an upside-down water fountain bolted to the ceiling, releases a thin jet of water into a hole in the floor. It’s a disquieting meditation on the nature of time — endlessly replenished but endlessly fleeting — made more ominous by “Well (elh version),” a series of small ledges bearing water glasses that must be topped up with eyedroppers every day by gallery staff.

William Pope.L weighs in on art and social change
By Paul Laster
William Pope.L weighs in on art and social change
Time Out New York May 23, 2017

Best known for absurdist public performances, Pope.L has a history of dealing with the politics of race and identity—which the African-American artist doesn’t limit to black versus white: His installation at the 2017 Whitney Biennial, for instance, consists of a four-sided structure covered with rows of rotting bologna slices meant to represent the percentage of Jews in New York City. With a solo show opening in midtown, Pope.L talks about his fascination with the relationship between words and pictures, his fondness for quirky materials and the importance of truth in his art.

This Week’s Must-See Art Events
By Michael Anthony Farley
This Week’s Must-See Art Events
ArtFCity May 22, 2017

A friend and I recently had a conversation about the trend of galleries putting together shows of famous artist’s lesser-known works from yesteryear and writing a vague exhibition text to explain why they’re important. Here, that means “an exhibition of early work by Pope.L dating from 1979-1994 that demonstrates the function of materiality and language in his practice.”

While that sentence doesn’t really say anything, we’re guessing this show will be good because Pope.L is a genius and the racial politics he’s addressed in his work since 1979 are sadly still all-too-relevant today. We’re guessing “the function of materiality and language” will always be “relevant” until we’re all telepathically linked by some Elon Musk gadget.

9 Art Events to Attend in New York City this Week
by The Editors of ARTnews
9 Art Events to Attend in New York City this Week
ARTNEWS May 22, 2017

On view at Mitchell- Innes & Nash will be Pope.L’s “Proto- Skin Sets,” made between 1979 and 1994 and never before publicly exhibited. Combining text and odd materials like semen, peanut butter, and hair, these works reflect on black history and how identity gets constructed. Also in this exhibition will be “Communications Devices,” a set of works form the 1970s in which Pope.L wrote on postcards from SoHo gallery shows, copied these promotional materials, and then left stacks of them in galleries. 

Julian Stanczak: The octogenarian painter on the power of red
By Julian Stanczak
Julian Stanczak: The octogenarian painter on the power of red
Modern Painters May 2017

I wanted Trespassing Light to appear effortless. I wanted to "hear" the red shout, and I am satisfied with the outcome. 

From Sally Mann to Carrie Mae Weems, These Photographers Captured What It Means to Be a Mother
By Demie Kim
From Sally Mann to Carrie Mae Weems, These Photographers Captured What It Means to Be a Mother
Artsy May 11, 2017

Kurland’s “Of Woman Born” series (2005–06) takes its name from a 1978 text by feminist poet Adrienne Rich, which argues that women should oppose the restrictive maternal roles prescribed by patriarchal society. 

May Exhibitions: Mark Bradford Reps U.S. at Venice Biennale, Martine Syms at MoMA, Plus Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, Pope.L, Beauford Delaney, Kehinde Wiley, and More
By Victoria L. Valentine
May Exhibitions: Mark Bradford Reps U.S. at Venice Biennale, Martine Syms at MoMA, Plus Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, Pope.L, Beauford Delaney, Kehinde Wiley, and More
Culture Type May 8, 2017

Generally made with pen and ink on graph paper, Pope.L’s Skin Set works from the late 1990s and into the 2010s offer sharp, sometimes witty critiques of the absurdity of racial stereotypes and references to skin color (i.e “Black People are the Window and the Breaking of the Window,” “Blue People Cannot Conceive of Themselves,” “White People Are Angles on Fire”). This exhibition of early works executed on local newspapers, billboards, and advertisements anticipates the artist’s Skin Set works. In a series of works dating from 1979-1994, Pope.L explores issues including race and masculinity and the function of language and materiality in his practice. The artist is also currently presenting work in the Whitney Biennial.

Monica Bonvicini at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
By Rachel Wetzler
Monica Bonvicini at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
Art in America May 2017

For this exhibition, the Italian-born, Berlin-based artist Monica Bonvicini bisected Mitchell-Innes & Nash's main space with a temporary wall supported by two small, dildolike "sculptures" in Murano glass resting on the floor. The installation, Structural Psychodrama #2 (2017), succinctly encapsulated the central theme of her work over the last twenty years: the imbrication of sex and architecture through relationships between the body and its shelters, barriers, props, and frames. As Bonvicini put it in a 2004 interview, "You have something under your belt and something over your head. And you need both." 

Julian Stanczak (1928–2017)
By Barbara Stanczak
Julian Stanczak (1928–2017)
Artforum April 29, 2017

Living together for almost fifty-five years, Julian and I—and later our children, too—experienced many memorable adventures; we crossed the country by car from one national park to the next, from one unique experience to another. As I took in nature’s formations and found myself enthralled by America’s geology, Julian was registering everything within his mind’s eye.

“It Feels Sacrificial”: An Artist Repeatedly Imprints Her Body on Paper
By Samuel Jablon
“It Feels Sacrificial”: An Artist Repeatedly Imprints Her Body on Paper
Hyperallergic April 19, 2017

In these works she literally covers herself in oil and pigment and lies on top of a human-sized sheet of paper. Depending on the print, the designs either obscure or highlight the artist’s gender. “I’ve always been looking for some sort of extremely indexical ‘I am here’ mark to put into my paintings,” she said.

Anthony Caro at Mitchell Innes & Nash
By David Ebony
Anthony Caro at Mitchell Innes & Nash
Art in America April 2017

English artist Anthony Caro left an enormous legacy when he died in 2013 at age eighty-nine. He was celebrated for his sculpture in Britain by the late 1950s, and internatinoally beginning in the early '60s. 

Goings On About Town
Press
Goings On About Town
The New Yorker April 2017

The Brooklyn artist writes a new chapter in the history of painting as performance—a powerful update of Yves Klein’s infamous use of naked women as blue-dipped brushes. Ferris’s imprints on paper of her own painted form, clad in a button-down shirt and belted jeans, have a cowboyish gender fluidity. The results can evoke Warhol’s iconic Elvis series, especially when Ferris’s hands rest at her hips, as if poised at a holster. In the turquoise-and-crimson “Joan/Joni,” we see a sturdy stance and a blurred head; in “twinKtwin,” the figure is headless and symmetrical, a vision in yellow and silver. The novel self-portraits may surprise viewers who know only the artist’s rambunctious abstractions—they will doubtless earn her some new fans as well.

Keltie Ferris at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, through May 6
By Emma Faith Hill
Keltie Ferris at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, through May 6
Art in America April 2017

The artist’s subjectivity is literally inseparable from the work in Keltie Ferris’s latest exhibition of body prints, “M\A\R\C\H.” She made the twenty-eight prints in the show by dousing her body, usually clothed but sometimes nude, in oil and pressing it against paper, then covering it with pigment. While the layered pigment renders every crease and crevice of clothing and flesh, the colors also work to create vibrating relationships that define the mood of the figure they make. On one wall, fourteen prints hang in a grid, each one radiating an individual palette, often mirrored by playful titles.

Behind the Exhibit: Chris Johanson: Possibilities
by Kasey Caminiti
Behind the Exhibit: Chris Johanson: Possibilities
Dujour April 2017

Mitchell-Innes & Nash recently debuted a new exhibit in Chelsea, Manhattan, on view from April 6 – May 13, 2017. Chris Johanson: Possibilities showcases new paintings and works on paper that invite you to physically interact with the art.

Keltie Ferris at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York
BY BLOUIN ARTINFO
Keltie Ferris at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York
Blouin ArtInfo April 13, 2017

Unlike her predecessors, Ferris’ body prints reject an easy gendered identification of the body, suggesting a fluid and performative state of gender identity. As no two prints are exactly the same, each work represents a multitude of forms, which when displayed together, present individual facets of the artist’s identity, both autonomous and dependent. 

Julian Stanczak, 88, Who Helped Shape Op Art Movement, Dies
By Roberta Smith
Julian Stanczak, 88, Who Helped Shape Op Art Movement, Dies
The New York Times April 12, 2017

Mr. Stanczak’s art evinced a tremendous geometric inventiveness. He constantly elaborated on the possibilities of parallel stripes, both straight and undulant; squares, both checkerboard and concentric; and grids, usually amplified by contrasting saturated colors.

Keltie Ferris: M\A\R\C\H
By Osman Can Yerebakan
Keltie Ferris: M\A\R\C\H
The Village Voice April 2017

Keltie Ferris's current show at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, "M\A\R\C\H," furthers the Brooklyn-based artist's experiments in exploring queer identity with recent selections from her ongoing series of body prints. Covering herself in oil and pressing her frame onto paper that she paints in beaming hues, Ferris triumphs over the surface and the very patriarchal ideology of her medium. The denim pants and shirts she dons in each print lend a distinct shape, challenging typical likenesses of the female nude. 

Time Out Loves
Press
Time Out Loves
Time Out New York April 5 - 11, 2017

On view are more of the artist's ongoing series of body prints, for which she covers herself in oil paint before pressing against a canvas on the floor. 

is the controversial Whitney Biennial just a bunch of bologna?
By Yevgeniya Traps
is the controversial Whitney Biennial just a bunch of bologna?
forward April 10, 2017

Certainty is only a claim, like the title of another perplexing piece in the Biennial. A re-creation of an earlier installation at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia, “Claim (Whitney Version)” by the artist Pope.L, aka William Pope.L, is a grid of 2,755 slices of bologna, each one affixed with a photocopied image, a blurry face, and corresponding, in total, to a percentage of New York’s Jewish population. The artist’s “claim,” made in an accompanying text, may be “a bit off,” he concedes. Such claims are bologna.

Whitney Biennial 2017
by Andrianna Campbell
Whitney Biennial 2017
Mousse Magazine April 2017

The curators, Mia Locks and Christopher Lew, have laid out a daring exhibition that is representative of a broad swath of the population. At its center is Pope.L (aka William Pope.L)’s Claim (Whitney Version) (2017), a pink box on the outside slathered mint green on the inside. Pinned with 2,755 slices of bologna, each slice has a photocopy portrait of a person affixed to it. PopeL. claims the slices are consistent with a percentage of New York City’s 1,086,000 Jewish residents. 

Conceptually, the luscious degradation and lingering stink points to anxieties about identity at the heart of the exhibition and indeed the greater culture in the United States. 

Chris Johanson at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
Press
Chris Johanson at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
artspeak April 2017

Possibilities, Johanson’s second solo exhibition at Mitchell-Innes & Nash introduces his whimsical and easy-going West Coast style that has become associated with Mission Art School. Cartoonish drawings, symbols from pop culture, and figures that morph into abstraction appear in bright, sunny colors often times accompanied by text. The artist, who went into the radar of New York art scene with his participation in the 2002 Whitney Biennial, uses different found material he finds on the street, paying homage to his early days as a street artist. 

CHRIS JOHANSON'S "POSSIBLITIES"
Press
CHRIS JOHANSON'S "POSSIBLITIES"
Juxtapose April 2017

Chris Johanson: Possibilities is an exhibition of new paintings and works on paper on view in an immersive installation at the Mitchell-Innes & Nash’s Chelsea space. Johanson’s work engages with the meditative qualities of art-making and the sincere direct communication through painting and sculpture.

documenta 14: Athens Conservatoire
BY HARRY THORNE
documenta 14: Athens Conservatoire
Frieze April 7, 2017

Pope.L’s Whispering Campaign (2016-17), installed in various forms across seven Athenian venues, preserves and passes on fragmented narrative artifacts, reinvesting in the art of hearing and being heard. At the Conservatoire, the campaign takes the form of a turquoise safe, which stands unassumingly in a corner. Its door remains locked, its contents out of site, but, if you pass it at an opportune moment, you will hear the dulcet tones of a singer from the southern US emanating from within. The figure himself is absent, his voice distorted over time, but his story is there to be preserved, if you want it. 

An interview with artist eddie martinez on his latest show 'cowboy town' at timothy taylor, london
By JETHRO TURNER
An interview with artist eddie martinez on his latest show 'cowboy town' at timothy taylor, london
Purple.fr April 7, 2017

“I’m gonna grab my roller chair,” says Eddie Martinez. Which he does. We’re in Timothy Taylor in London looking at his new paintings. The very kind PR who has offered to get me a coffee has returned with it, but there’s nowhere to put it near us, with me standing and holding a phone as a mic, and Eddie sitting in his office roller chair, so the coffee sits slowly cooling on the side of the conversation like a gooseberry while we talk. I drink it on the way out and it’s still a nice temperature. If you get bored at any point reading this, think about the coffee.

Eddie is the kind of guy who gets himself a roller chair without asking if I’d like one too, but he also invites me to touch the paintings and explains them, and it’s all nice. He’s also apologetic about his self-professed inarticulacy and I should have told him that he didn’t need to be.

Forget That White Lady’s Emmett Till Painting; These Black Artists Are Truly Representing at the Whitney Biennial
By Genetta M. Adams
Forget That White Lady’s Emmett Till Painting; These Black Artists Are Truly Representing at the Whitney Biennial
The Root April 6, 2017

Multimedia artist Pope.L’s installation, Claim (Whitney Version), features 2,755 slices of bologna pinned to its wall, and each slice bears a portrait of someone who is supposedly Jewish. The piece raises questions of collective identity and how people turn abstract when reduced to numbers. Within the structure is a typewritten statement, with copy-edit marks from the artists, that ponders whether the rotting, dripping bologna represents “the flesh returning back to world” or maybe the slices are “mourning a haunted order.”

The Tao of Szymczyk: documenta 14 Curator Says to Understand His Show, Forget Everything You Know
By Hili Perlson
The Tao of Szymczyk: documenta 14 Curator Says to Understand His Show, Forget Everything You Know
Artnet News April 6, 2017

The opening-week program spans a list of performances too long to reprint, but some highlights will surely be provided by the likes of Sanja Iveković, who is creating a “creative oral document” at Avdi Square every day from 11 am to 9 pm; Pope.L, whose multi-part performance will happen across “five to six public spaces” over five hours; or sex activist Annie Sprinkle, who also participated in the pre-program in Athens with a lecture on the pleasures of water.

Politics and performance take centre stage at Documenta 14 in Athens
by JULIA MICHALSKA
Politics and performance take centre stage at Documenta 14 in Athens
The Art Newspaper April 6, 2017

In Athens, the Documenta team is collaborating with around 40 local institutions, including the Benaki Museum, the Archaeological Museum of Piraeus, the Numismatic Museum and as the First Cemetery of Athens where, from 8 April, the American artist Pope.L will be performing his Whispering Campaign (2016-17) in which five performers will roam the city whispering their observations to the public. 

Gallery Hopping: Eddie Martinez Plays Cowboys and Politics at Timothy Taylor
By Perwana Nazif
Gallery Hopping: Eddie Martinez Plays Cowboys and Politics at Timothy Taylor
Artnet News April 3, 2017

Timothy Taylor‘s “Cowboy Town” exhibition—which opened to the public on Thursday—gathers a series of new paintings by Brooklyn-based artist Eddie Martinez. 

4 Things You Can’t Afford to Miss at miart 2017
By Hili Perlson
4 Things You Can’t Afford to Miss at miart 2017
Artnet News March 31, 2017

Barbara Kasten and Jessica Stockholder, presented by Bortolami and Galleria Raffaella Cortese at the “Generations” section, miart 2017
“We are both involved in asking questions about the limits of the forms that contain our work,” writes Stockholder of this artistic dialogue. “At the same time, we care deeply for the inventive and evocative space of the picture, and how that space has the capacity to reify emotional life.”

Must See New York
Press
Must See New York
Artforum March 31, 2017

Keltie Ferris’s disorienting, lambent abstractions—like a marriage between Albers and Oehlen, bathed in acetone—become even more physical with her current exhibition at Mitchell-Innes & Nash’s Uptown space. For this grouping of works, started in 2013, the artist made prints from her body. Creases from clothes and flesh show up in these strange and playful images, Shroud of Turin–like.

The 15 New York Shows You Need to See This April
BY CASEY LESSER
The 15 New York Shows You Need to See This April
Artsy March 30, 2017

Ferris creates her “Body Prints”—which recall the works of David Hammons, Jasper Johns, and Yves Klein—by applying oil to her own body (clothed or nude) and pressing herself onto paper on the floor of her studio. A stark contrast to her well-known abstract, spray-painted works, these prints retain a sense of self-portraiture that transcends gender identity, presenting fluid, dynamic bodies that provoke questions of artmaking and representation.

9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week
BY The Editors of ARTnews
9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week
Artnews March 27, 2017

Keltie Ferris may be better known these days for her digital-looking abstractions, but this show will give her body prints a proper showcase. To make them, Ferris—sometimes clothed, sometimes not—covers herself in oil and presses her body against a canvas. The result is a figure whose gender is ambiguous, with an unreadable expression to boot. Drawing on a history of body printing that includes Jasper Johns and David Hammons, Ferris explores the connection between a painter and her canvas. How much Ferris’s identity comes through in the final product is always a point of inquiry.

General Idea: Mexico City at the Museo Jumex
by Brian Droitcour
General Idea: Mexico City at the Museo Jumex
Art in America March 24, 2017

Gay nightlife gave rise to the drag ball as an underground simulation of female celebrity. General Idea, the Toronto-based art collective, did something similar with its Miss General Idea pageant, though only one of the four winners of the annual event, held in Toronto from 1968 to 1971, was a man; the competition wasn’t about gender so much as it was about art as a system for producing value and fame. Playing on a monitor at the entrance to the retrospective exhibition “General Idea: Broken Time” at the Museo Jumex, Pilot (1977), which the group made for Ontario public television, is a thirty-minute deadpan documentary on the pageant that provides an introduction to the collective’s interests and sensibilities.

Monica Bonvicini at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
BY TAYLOR DAFOE
Monica Bonvicini at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
Blouin ArtInfo March 23, 2017

RE pleasure RUN” is Bonvicini’s first New York exhibition in 10 years. Fittingly, it could be thought of as a kind of mini-survey, bringing together all the predominant strains of the Italian-born, Berlin-based artist’s varied practice—namely wall-based installations, light and leather sculptures, found photo collages, works on paper, paints, and glass dildos. Over the course of her 30-year career, Bonvicini has explored through these projects issues around identity, structures of power, and the limits of language. And she has done so with her signature mixture of provocation, innuendo, and wit. The resulting message, if there is one, is often ambiguous.

Double Take—Whitney Biennial 2017
by Chris Sharp and Genevieve Yue
Double Take—Whitney Biennial 2017
Art-Agenda March 21, 2017

Focusing primarily on solo presentations of artists, as in one artist per space, the show is well-curated with more than one canny juxtaposition (two personal favorites were Leigh Ledare’s 16 mm film Vokzal [2016] of the public around three Moscow train stations with John Divola’s elegant “Abandoned Paintings” [2007–8] photos, which feature recuperated discarded student paintings in derelict domestic settings, and Henry Taylor’s big brushy paintings of black communities next to Deana Lawson’s elaborately staged, intimate portraits of black subjects). 

Why the Whitney’s Humanist, Pro-Diversity Biennial Is a Revelation
By Roberta Smith
Why the Whitney’s Humanist, Pro-Diversity Biennial Is a Revelation
The New York Times March 16, 2017

Pope.L’s enormous room covered inside and out with a careful grid of embellished slices of baloney, embodies his usual sarcasm, even if the point about population breakdowns remains obscure.

The Bold Groups Tying Art History to Political History at the Whitney Biennial
by Siddhartha Mitter
The Bold Groups Tying Art History to Political History at the Whitney Biennial
The Village Voice March 15, 2017

Even before they enter the museum, visitors to the 2017 Whitney Biennial may spot, as they peer toward Renzo Piano’s industrial edifice from Gansevoort Street, a monumental object perched on the terrace. It has the form of a large melon, is inscribed with mystical markings, and sits at the center of a concrete circle like the statue in a traffic roundabout. A creation of the art collective GCC, it is inspired by an actual melon that appeared one day in the United Arab Emirates, where police destroyed it, documenting the process on social media, to neutralize its supposed occult force. Its reincarnation in one of the world’s most prestigious exhibitions suggests that state power couldn’t kill the magic.

9 Artists You Should Give a F*ck About at the 2017 Whitney Biennial
By KARA WEISENSTEIN
9 Artists You Should Give a F*ck About at the 2017 Whitney Biennial
Creators March 15, 2017

For the Whitney Museum of American Art's first Biennial in its new home in the Meatpacking district, its curators chose quintessentially 2017 key themes: the formation of self and the individual's place in a turbulent society. As you might expect, traces of American political turmoil tinge much of the art.

The Whitney Nails a Balancing-Act Biennial
By Ben Davis
The Whitney Nails a Balancing-Act Biennial
Artnet News March 14, 2017

One of the senior figures here is Pope.L, the consistently discomfiting Chicago-based African-American artist whose fifth-floor installation, a kind of free-standing room, is adorned with a number of actual, fleshy, putrefying baloney slices, nailed to its walls in grid.

10 Art Works You Must See At The 2017 Whitney Biennial
By Adam Lehrer
10 Art Works You Must See At The 2017 Whitney Biennial
Forbes March 14, 2017

A film split into three 16 mm projections assembled randomly throughout a space, Vozkal captures the social interactions of hundreds of Russian citizens loitering, working in, or passing through a Moscow train station. What is so fascinating about the projections is that while you watch the citizens go about their days, they at first seem like they are free to do what they want. But a creeping sense of dread builds throughout the piece as you begin to notice perilous looking men lurking about, perhaps policing or spying on the area. It reminds the viewer that a modern society falls into chaos and fear quietly. 

The 2017 Whitney Biennial Is a Pitch-Perfect Survey of Art Today
BY TESS THACKARA
The 2017 Whitney Biennial Is a Pitch-Perfect Survey of Art Today
Artsy March 14, 2017

All the while, the stomach-turning scent of Pope.L’s installation wafts across much of the floor. It includes almost 3000 slices of baloney, each imprinted with a portrait of “a purported Jewish person pasted at its center” and pinned to the inner and outer walls of a box-like environment. Within its chamber, a note typed by the artist in irregular font and scrawled over with a pen bemoans the racial and ethnic categorization of humans, “as if we are simply sets in a math problem.”

The 2017 Whitney Biennial Is the Most Politically Charged in Decades
By Jerry Saltz
The 2017 Whitney Biennial Is the Most Politically Charged in Decades
New York Magazine March 14, 2017

Leigh Ledare’s three film loops were made last year around Moscow train stations. In them, we see a possible ghost of America’s near future — people under autocratic rule, made numb, hailing from numerous social and racial strata, all barely interacting; the broken, homeless, and addicted existing but invisible alongside state workers, the wealthy, figures fighting, mothers helping their children go to the bathroom against walls. I saw a possible America in this almost animal society, its political house on fire.

See the Eye-Catching Highlights of the 2017 Whitney Biennial
By Henri Neuendorf
See the Eye-Catching Highlights of the 2017 Whitney Biennial
Artnet News March 13, 2017

There are plenty of exciting works at the museum's marquee event.

Stained Glass, Rotting Bologna, And Rebellion At The Whitney's First Downtown Biennial
By Scott Lynch
Stained Glass, Rotting Bologna, And Rebellion At The Whitney's First Downtown Biennial
Village Voice March 13, 2017

There are 63 artists in the Whitney Biennial this time around, and while individual results may vary, some of my personal favorites would include Pope L's "Claim (Whitney Version)," a giant cube covered inside and out with meticulously-spaced slices of rotting bologna, each one of which is embedded with a bleary, photocopied portrait.

Whitney Biennial 2017 Review: Aesthetics Are Alive Downtown
By PETER PLAGENS
Whitney Biennial 2017 Review: Aesthetics Are Alive Downtown
The Wall Street Journal March 13, 2017

Every Biennial contains a couple of did-you-see? popular hits. In 2017, the two are likely to be by Pope.L aka William Pope.L and Raúl de Nieves. “Claim (Whitney Version)” 2017, Pope.L’s large box room, is festooned on the outside with slices of real bologna dripping grease and arranged in a grid, mimicking round dots on a chart. The smell, surprisingly, isn’t unpleasant and the artist’s jibe at coldly translating flesh-and-blood beings into data spots registers immediately. 

An Early Look at the 2017 Whitney Biennial, Arriving in Time to Tackle America's Turmoil
By Diane Solway
An Early Look at the 2017 Whitney Biennial, Arriving in Time to Tackle America's Turmoil
W Magazine March 13, 2017

Among the 63 artists featured working in various media, are established artists like Americans Larry Bell and Dana Schutz, up-and-comers like Torey Thornton and Shara Hughes, and collectives like the Gulf-based GCC and the American trio Postcommodity. 

An Omnivorous Tour of the 2017 Whitney Biennial
By Benjamin Sutton
An Omnivorous Tour of the 2017 Whitney Biennial
Hyperallergic March 13, 2017

The 2017 Whitney Biennial, the institution’s first since its move to the Meatpacking District, opens to the public later this week, but already the buzz is positive. 

Pope.L in ArtNews Today
By Andy Battaglia
Pope.L in ArtNews Today
ARTNEWS March 13, 2017

Written and signed by Pope.L himself, the text took on the absurd duty of explicating a work—titled Claim (Whitney Version), 2017—that is, among other things, about absurdity itself. The slices of bologna (2,755, to be exact) are said to correspond to a ratio relating to the number of Jewish citizens living in New York, and all the rest follows from that, from a methodical portrait-taking system to an ostensibly hyper-organized arrangement of objects in a grid with pencil lines to keep everything straight.

Jacolby Satterwhite Evokes Queer Spaces of Every Kind in Epic Tribute Album to His Late Mother
By R. Kurt Osenlund
Jacolby Satterwhite Evokes Queer Spaces of Every Kind in Epic Tribute Album to His Late Mother
OUT Magazine March 10, 2017

Squeezed into a prop-riddled balcony in Brooklyn's Spectrum dance club (or Dreamouse) on Wycoff Avenue, Jacolby Satterwhite is defying the laws of nature. Donned in vintage clothes that loosely hang on his nimble limbs, the artist is rapidly contorting his body into different pretzel-like poses, eventually holding one as he sinks into a pile of faux-fur pillows and garbage bags. While some might call it eccentric, the whole tableau is in fact quite minimalistic for Satterwhite, who previously, as seen in the pages of OUT and in exhibitions around the globe, has performed in spandex bodysuits covered with androgynous protrusions and digital screens. “I've moved away from that for a couple of years,” Satterwhite says. “I think right now I have a different message. My work is still gonna be 3D-animated and otherworldly and weird, but lately I feel much more satisfied with the conversation I'm having with my audience—it's about tactility and connection. I think it's more about realism for me.”

Group Think
By Carol Kind
Group Think
Newsweek March 10, 2017

This spring visitors to the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City will be greeted by a huge orange melon looming over the sixth-floor terrace. The work—inspired by a mysterious fruit covered in occult writings that washed up on a Persian Gulf beach last fall—is by the international artist collective GCC. And it's a highlight of Whitney Biennial 2017, the major survey of new American art, opening March 17. 

A User’s Guide to the Whitney Biennial: Pope.L
By Jason Farago
A User’s Guide to the Whitney Biennial: Pope.L
The New York Times March 8, 2017

One of the show’s senior figures is the Chicago artist Pope.L — who facetiously called himself “the friendliest black artist in America,” and whose views on race and self are wildly unfixed. Here he reworks a 2014 installation in which hundreds of slices of bologna are fixed with small, hard-to-decipher photos. Mr. Pope.L suggests in an adjacent text that the photos represent Jewish people — but then again, the sitters may not be Jewish at all. Take the pungent bologna any way you like it. Ms. Locks put it this way: “I love the idea that it’s this perfect grid, this perfect system, with the most false, sloppy data points you’ve ever seen. Literally deteriorating.”

Monica Bonvicini Selects Toni Schmale for the BALTIC's Emerging Artists' Award
By Caroline Elbaor
Monica Bonvicini Selects Toni Schmale for the BALTIC's Emerging Artists' Award
Artnet News March 3, 2017

The BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art in Gateshead, UK has announced that the four winners of its inaugural 2017 award are Jose Dávila, Eric N. Mack, Toni Schmale, and Shen Xin. Selected individually by Monica Bonvicini, Mike Nelson, Pedro Cabrita Reis, and Lorna Simpson, the four emerging artists will each be given a 13-week exhibition at the BALTIC (to open on June 30, 2017), £25,000 ($30,665) to create new works, and a £5,000 ($6,133) artist fee.

New York City Art Crawl
by Noah Dillon
New York City Art Crawl
Elephant March 3, 2017

Over on 25th street, Monica Bonvicini’s solo show at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, RE pleasure RUN, conflates erections with erection—construction—of architectural elements, including walls, in an S&M-tinted play on gender roles, production and displays of power and gratification. Mitchell-Innes & Nash is also showing at the Independent Art Fair, with work by Pope.L.

Scenes from the Independent Art Fair
by Katherine McMahon
Scenes from the Independent Art Fair
Art News March 3, 2017

This year’s installment of the Independent art fair opened today, with a preview this afternoon and a public opening Friday, March 3. In Spring Studios in Tribeca for a second year, the fair gathers 52 exhibitors from 20 cities, with 15 presenting booths for the first time. Below, have a look around the fair.

Independent New York Opens Second Edition in Tribeca With Solid Sales, Sun-Drenched Booths
by Nate Freeman
Independent New York Opens Second Edition in Tribeca With Solid Sales, Sun-Drenched Booths
Art News March 3, 2017

Dealers this afternoon, a few hours into the opening, reported that the collectors who come to Independent New York are often looking to snap up quite specific objects—and that makes it easy to choose what you bring.

“This is a pretty low-stress fair,” said Mitchell-Innes & Nash director Bridget Finn. “We’ve done well enough that if it ended now, we’d be satisfied.”

The gallery had off-loaded several works by Pope.L, including nearly ten small sculptures priced at $10,000 each. 

From the Subtle to the Sexual, Independent's Eighth Edition Carves Its Own Path
By Scott Indrisek
From the Subtle to the Sexual, Independent's Eighth Edition Carves Its Own Path
Artsy March 3, 2017

Certain large-scale pieces seem unlikely to find a home except with the most daring collectors, or at least the ones that don’t have kids. At Mitchell-Innes & Nash, a multimedia triptych by Leigh Ledare (Stalemate, 2017), culls found imagery from Russian fashion magazines, advertising, pornography, and other sources, along with material sure to delight any future conservator (cleaning fluid, foie gras, and human excrement). The gallery director Bridget Finn explained that Ledare views it as “a montage, a map to the current social and political climate,” which seems about right. The three-part work, which costs in the range of $40,000, is an oblique companion piece to a film shot in a Moscow train station that Ledare will unveil at this year’s Whitney Biennial.

Goings On About Town
Press
Goings On About Town
The New Yorker March 3, 2017

The aggressively enigmatic works of the Italian artist suggest a lot and explain little, beyond dropped hints of erotic and political discontent. Walls are shimmed up on small glass-phallus sculptures. Clustered men’s belts assume a testicular shape. Fragmented syllables in white neon, on an aluminum rack, instruct “No more masturbation,” but they don’t say why. In a grainy photographic mural, workmen do something incomprehensible to a grimy brick wall. Scores of white L.E.D. tubes hang horizontally in tangles of wire. What’s it all about? Your call.

AO On-Site: Independent NY At Spring Studios, March 2nd - 5th, 2017
by D. Creahan
AO On-Site: Independent NY At Spring Studios, March 2nd - 5th, 2017
Art Observed March 2, 2017

With NADA splitting some of the exhibitors from past years between fairs, this year’s edition seemed to tend slightly closer to the higher end of the market, as galleries frequently associated with Armory skipped that fair in favor of Independent, or doubled down on both exhibitions.  Mitchell-Innes & Nash, for instance, had focused in on a booth at Independent skipping its usual place at The Armory Show and ADAA Art Show in favor of a booth here, showing works by GCC and Leigh Ledare, among others.

Barnes Foundation gets out of the gallery into the street with its new exhibit
by Esther Yoon
Barnes Foundation gets out of the gallery into the street with its new exhibit
philly.com March 2, 2017

Surface Tension serves as the backdrop to a video projection of William Pope.L’s 2000 performance “The Great White Way, 22 Miles, 9 Years, 1 Street,” in which he famously crawled 22 miles of sidewalk from the beginning to the end of Broadway — Manhattan’s longest street — wearing a capeless Superman outfit with a skateboard strapped to his back.

The Conformists
by Alex Kitnick
The Conformists
Artforum March 1, 2017

AT THE HEIGHT of the Reagan-era culture wars and the AIDS crisis—a moment that shaped today’s battles over social values, over what is normal and what is not—General Idea decided to fit in. The group explored assimilation and transgression, convention and critique, biopolitics and style. They inserted their quixotic brand of activism, agitprop, marketing, and performance, virus-like, into the mainstream, with results that were anything but. On the occasion of the retrospective “Broken Time,” which travels to the Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires this month, critic Alex Kitnick takes a new look at General Idea—and their reimagining of what art and life could be.

Justine Kurland in Bookforum
By Lidija Haas
Justine Kurland in Bookforum
Highway Kind Feb/March 2017

In Highway Kind, we see Justine Kurland's on-the-road photographs as if through a film of fantasy - a very masculine, very American fantasy, about freedom and self-reliance and the big wide open.

The 20 Shows You Need to See during Armory Week
BY CASEY LESSER AND DEMIE KIM
The 20 Shows You Need to See during Armory Week
Artsy February 25, 2017

Bonvicini addresses power dynamics, effective communication, and even the structure of the gallery itself in this new show. Central to the exhibition is Structural Psychodramas #2 (2017), a large-scale installation of temporary walls that questions the architecture of art institutions. Neon text works, one of which reads “NO MORE MASTURBATION,” offer a cheeky commentary on the role of desire in the present moment.

9 ART EVENTS TO ATTEND IN NEW YORK CITY THIS WEEK
BY The Editors of ARTnews
9 ART EVENTS TO ATTEND IN NEW YORK CITY THIS WEEK
Artnews February 20, 2017

It’s been ten years since Monica Bonvicini had a show in New York. This week, she’ll return with “RE pleasure RUN,” her first solo show with Mitchell-Innes & Nash.

This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Happy Not-My-President’s Day
By Michael Anthony Farley
This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Happy Not-My-President’s Day
ArtFCity February 20, 2017

There’s something undeniably seductive about Monica Bonvicini’s work. Whether it’s a neon sculpture or painting of a burned-out building, her (usually monochromatic) pieces have a vaguely S&M quality and wouldn’t look out of place in the background of a high-fashion editorial photoshoot. But beyond looking good, they’re subtly loaded with content. Bonvicini speaks to structures, both literally (as in the architectural sense) and figuratively (as in those of power). 

Editors’ Picks: 6 Things to See in New York This Week
By Sarah Cascone
Editors’ Picks: 6 Things to See in New York This Week
ArtNet News February 20, 2017

Berlin-based, Italian conceptual artist Monica Bonvicini gets her first New York solo show in a decade. Her debut at the gallery centers on Structural Psychodramas #2, an installation of small Murano glass sculptures, as well as two of the artist’s monumental disaster paintings and large-scale, provocative neon works, one of which reads “NO MORE MASTURBATION.”

Protest Art in the Era of Trump
By M.H. Miller
Protest Art in the Era of Trump
T Magazine February 20, 2017

“I was excited about Obama, but at the same time I was wondering how the machine of conventional politics would nullify his impact. You could say I was suspicious. I’m the kind of person who sees clouds on the horizon. Or smoke. There’s always this sense that there’s more to do. And we became complacent. Otherwise I don’t think what happened on Nov. 8 would have happened. It’s almost as if we thought black people — or President Obama — could solve everything. It’s about some fantasy we had — this Caramel Camelot. And so now we are where we are."

AMERICANISMO
Pope.L in conversation with Mia Locks
AMERICANISMO
Mousse Magazine February 2017

Pope.L and Mia Locks discuss "Americanismo" in the 57th issue of Mousse Magazine. 

TELL ’EM WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO TELL ’EM
By Zak Kitnick
TELL ’EM WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO TELL ’EM
Artnews February 9, 2017

There is an unmistakable ashes-to-ashes, dust-to-dust, circle-of-life quality, an equally youthful then mature balance of roughness and polish that only occurs at either end of life.
Another saying that comes to mind is, live by the sword, die by the sword. An old friend once told me, “You better hope what you did as a kid was good, because you always go back to it.”

Monica Bonvicini: Her Hand Around the Room
Press
Monica Bonvicini: Her Hand Around the Room
Elephant February 3, 2017

 

Monica Bonvicini was born in the 60s in Venice and finished her studies at California Insitute of Arts and in Berlin in 1992. Her work since–dipping between installation, sculpture, video and drawing–has been influenced by architecture, exploring both public and private spaces, and is often noted to have sprung from the sex clubs that the artist found herself frequenting during the 90s.

What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
By Roberta Smith
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
The New York Times February 2, 2017

In the excellent exhibition “Anthony Caro: First Drawings Last Sculptures,” which occupies both Mitchell-Innes & Nash locations, the pieces do a little of everything while adding something new: thick slabs of tinted or clear Perspex (acrylic sheets). The sculptures in Chelsea are especially powerful in scale and size. But as you walk around them, viewing their structures from different sides, noting the collusions of metal and plastic, human perception seems scrupulously accounted for.

NEW YORK – ANTHONY CARO: “FIRST DRAWINGS LAST SCULPTURES”
By D. Creahan
NEW YORK – ANTHONY CARO: “FIRST DRAWINGS LAST SCULPTURES”
Art Observed January 23, 2017

In the early years of his career, Anthony Caro worked on a series of twisting, enigmatic depictions of human and animal figures, works that owed much to the spatial interrogations of Picasso and the broader canon of 20th Century European abstraction.  The works are impressive in their understanding of the gestural and conceptual operations of the era’s avant-garde, but for Caro’s career, served in part as a starting point for his own engagement with space, not only on paper or canvas, but in three dimensions. 

'Speak Out On Inauguration Day': Words At The Whitney Museum Take Aim At Trump
By Andy Battaglia and Andrew Russeth
'Speak Out On Inauguration Day': Words At The Whitney Museum Take Aim At Trump
Artnews January 20, 2017
10 Places to See Public Art in 2017
By Alina Cohen
10 Places to See Public Art in 2017
T Magazine January 19, 2017

The Barnes Foundation will celebrate more than 50 artists’ engagement with different communities in “Person of the Crowd: The Contemporary Art of Flânerie,” opening Feb. 25. The artists Tania Bruguera and Sanford Biggers will organize performances in the city streets, and the Guerrilla Girls collective will create billboards. Additionally, Monument Lab (a group of curators, scholars, students and artists who aim to ask what kind of monuments the city needs) will mount a temporary work by the Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. In May, the Association for Public Art will bring the artist Martin Puryear’s largest public sculpture to date, “Big Bling,” to the city for six months.

Anthony Caro: Did Old Age Set Free His Inner Comic?
By Blake Gopnik
Anthony Caro: Did Old Age Set Free His Inner Comic?
Artnet News January 19, 2017

Once a cartoonish vibe takes hold of the works, the weighty hunks of steel in them start seeming faintly comic as well. Some of Caro’s steel consists of repurposed found objects: a hopper used to cart sand; a chunk from some kind of gantry. Rather than being elevated from their humble origins thanks to Caro’s high art, these objects now seem to keep Caro’s art down-to-earth – almost like found anchors that keep his foofy acrylic from blowing away.

FROM THE ARCHIVES: LAWRENCE ALLOWAY AND WILLIAM FEAVER ON ANTHONY CARO’S GRITTY SCULPTURES
By Lawrence Alloway & William Feaver
FROM THE ARCHIVES: LAWRENCE ALLOWAY AND WILLIAM FEAVER ON ANTHONY CARO’S GRITTY SCULPTURES
Artnews January 13, 2017

With an Anthony Caro show currently on view at Mitchell-Innes & Nash gallery in New York, we turn back through the ARTnews archives. Because the show brings together very early and very late work from the British artist’s career, we have selected one old excerpt, by Lawrence Alloway, and one new sample, by William Feaver, who in 2014 wrote an essay following Caro’s death the year before. 

Anthony Caro’s ‘First Drawings Last Sculptures’ at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
BY BLOUIN ARTINFO
Anthony Caro’s ‘First Drawings Last Sculptures’ at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
ArtInfo January 12, 2017

This is the artist’s first exhibition in the US since his death in 2013 and his sixth with Mitchell-Innes & Nash, who has exclusively represented Caro in New York for 14 years. The exhibition features work spanning Caro’s 60-year career and highlights the artist’s fearless and constant innovation throughout his lifetime.

This Getty Show Reveals The Deep Roots Of The Media's Woes -- And How Artists Can Rescue The News
By Jonathon Keats
This Getty Show Reveals The Deep Roots Of The Media's Woes -- And How Artists Can Rescue The News
Forbes January 11, 2017

At the height of the Vietnam War, an artist named Martha Rosler started clipping pictures of the conflict from the pages of Life. She also collected images from adjacent pages showcasing luxurious American interiors. With a touch of glue, she merged the two, making up scenes that collided realities that mainstream media tended to keep comfortably separated.

"The Scene of the Crime Is the Bed": Artist Monica Bonvicini on the Allure of BDSM, and Making the Political Personal
The Phaidon Folio
"The Scene of the Crime Is the Bed": Artist Monica Bonvicini on the Allure of BDSM, and Making the Political Personal
Artspace January 4, 2017

In this interview with the art historian Alexander Alberro excerpted from Phaidon’s Monica Bonvicini, Bonvicini sheds light on her famously brash use of materials, the liberating nature of BDSM clubs, and how the personal is always political, even when we least expect it.

GCC at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
By Rahel Aima
GCC at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
Art in America January 2017

The show charted the flourishing popularity in the Gulf of "positive lifestyle" practices - encompassing anything from yoga and healthy eating to New Age spiritualties - as well as their instrumentalization by governments as technologies of control. 

Between the lies: new exhibit explores how form affects function in media
The Guardian
Between the lies: new exhibit explores how form affects function in media
Breaking News: Turning the Lens on Mass Media at the Getty, Los Angeles December 29, 2016

An anti-war protester at the time, Martha Rosler grew frustrated with the way such images were diminished when juxtaposed with trivial advertisements and inconsequential news items.

Anthony Caro at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York
BY BLOUIN ARTINFO
Anthony Caro at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York
ArtInfo December 27, 2016

The exhibition brings together late British artist Sir Anthony Caro’s works spanning his sixty years career highlighting the artist’s fearless and constant innovation. 

How General Idea Got Specific to Confront the AIDS Crisis
By Devon Van Houten Maldonado
How General Idea Got Specific to Confront the AIDS Crisis
Hyperallergic December 20, 2016

The Canadian artist collective General Idea  found its drive in the AIDS epidemic, becoming aesthetically and conceptually refined in the in the 1970s and ’80s, after long forays into absurdity and performances evocative of Dada and Fluxus. A retrospective presented by the Jumex Museum elucidates the collective’s progression from troublemakers to activist artists calling attention to the epidemic, which ultimately claimed two of its three members and countless others in the queer creative community.

Last Chance: Leigh Ledare at Office Baroque, Brussels
BY BLOUIN ARTINFO DATEBOOK
Last Chance: Leigh Ledare at Office Baroque, Brussels
ArtInfo December 19, 2016

This is the New York-based artist's first exhibition in Brussels. On view are Ledare’s three bodies of works—Vokzal, The Walk, and The Large Group. 

Amanda Ross-Ho with Miranda July on the Whitney Biennial
By Stephanie Eckardt
Amanda Ross-Ho with Miranda July on the Whitney Biennial
W Magazine December 19, 2016

Miranda July speaks with fellow biennial alumni artists Edgar Arceneaux, Amanda Ross-Ho, and Catherine Opie to explain the survey and share their experiences with it. 

Raised on the Road: Justine Kurland in Conversation with Her Son, Casper
Press
Raised on the Road: Justine Kurland in Conversation with Her Son, Casper
aperture December 19, 2016

After years traversing the U.S. in a van, the photographer and her son sit down for a candid interview.

20 New York Shows to See over the Holidays
By Casey Lesser
20 New York Shows to See over the Holidays
Artsy December 16, 2016

For the first U.S. exhibitions of Caro’s work since his death in 2013, the gallery mounts two concurrent shows, at its Chelsea and Upper East Side locations, featuring works that bookend the great sculptor’s innovative, 60-year career.

THE LOOKOUT
By William S. Smith
THE LOOKOUT
Art in America December 2016

There’s always more to discover in Antony Caro’s sculptures, miraculously refined compositions of sometimes scrappy industrial materials.

The Top Emerging Artists of 2016: GCC
By Artsy Editorial
The Top Emerging Artists of 2016: GCC
Artsy December 2016

The work’s über-slick visual identity—and the very global and mostly digitally connected nature of GCC’s delegates—has placed GCC among the post-internet art movement’s greatest stars. “GCC keeps knocking it out of the park,” says the Whitney’s Christopher Lew of the collective, who he’s tapped for a new commission for the 2017 Whitney Biennial he’s curating along with Mia Locks. Referencing Positive Pathways (+), he adds, “As mindfulness and new age belief has been adopted by both individuals and corporations, GCC brings to light how the Gulf nations have brought these ideas into government. Their look at the theater and substance of nationhood is pressing now more than ever.”

WHEN NATIONS BECOME BRANDS: GCC ON TACKLING THE GULF REGION’S VALUES, AND GAZING INTO THE AREA’S FUTURE
By Alex Greenberger
WHEN NATIONS BECOME BRANDS: GCC ON TACKLING THE GULF REGION’S VALUES, AND GAZING INTO THE AREA’S FUTURE
ARTNEWS November 10, 2016

With its Mitchell-Innes & Nash show, GCC has become like a healer, drawing on the healthy living and positive lifestyle trends currently taking the Gulf region by storm. Positive Pathways (+) (Version II), 2016, an installation similar to one that debuted at this year’s DIS-curated Berlin Biennale, features a sculpture performing the Quantum Touch technique, a form of non-contact touch therapy. (A few days earlier, the members could be seen putting down sand around the sculpture, which, when it was shown in Berlin, was at the center of a teardrop-shaped racetrack.) Nearby is a series of relief works based on stills from YouTube videos that, with their velvety red surfaces, recall fabrics in Titian paintings and over-decorated homes.

Monica Bonvicini’s ‘her hand around the room’ at Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead
BY AMANDA AVERY
Monica Bonvicini’s ‘her hand around the room’ at Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead
ArtInfo December 9, 2016

An exhibition of provocative, large-scale installations by Monica Bonvicini is on display at the Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art in Gateshead through February 26, 2017.

Leigh Ledare at Office Baroque, Brussels
BY ELLEN MARA DE WACHTER
Leigh Ledare at Office Baroque, Brussels
Frieze.com December 5, 2016

Three projects exploring human behaviour and pathologies intertwine in this exhibition of works by the American artist Leigh Ledare at Office Baroque, Brussels. 

11 Female Artists Who Left Their Mark on Pop Art
By Rachel Lebowitz
11 Female Artists Who Left Their Mark on Pop Art
Artsy December 12, 2016

From its inception in the early 1960s, Pop Art was a boys’ club. Huge names like Andy Warhol and Tom Wesselmann
perpetuated the myth of the (male) artist-as-genius. The movement emerged amid the post-World War II explosions of capitalist consumerism and mass media, as artists explored new modes of mechanical production, often by taking commonplace consumer goods and pop-cultural icons as their subject matter. Associated with an unemotional, distanced attitude toward artmaking, Pop Art’s codified characteristics are, in turn, stereotypically male.

Proceeding Together: Martha Rosler in Conversation with Anna Dannemann
Anna Dannemann & Martha Rosler
Proceeding Together: Martha Rosler in Conversation with Anna Dannemann
The Photographers' Gallery Blog December 1, 2016

Alongside the current exhibition Feminist Avant-Garde of the 1970s: Works From the Verbund Collection at The Photographers' Gallery, the new issue of the quarterly publication Loose Associations takes feminism as its subject. In this interview, artist Martha Rosler considers the past, and the future, of feminist art practice.

Jay DeFeo at Marc Selwyn Fine Art
By Andy Campbell
Jay DeFeo at Marc Selwyn Fine Art
Artforum December 2016

This installation of the DeFeo's “Samurai” series, 1986–87, begins to redress this narrative, as many of these large-format paintings on paper refute the notion of a singularly careful and slow-working painter.

Wall maker: Monica Bonvicini delves into architectural divisions
By Elly Parsons
Wall maker: Monica Bonvicini delves into architectural divisions
Wallpaper* November 28, 2016

Italian artist Monica Bonvicini's practice has focused on two rather unusual themes: walls and sex. An extensive survey of the Berlin-based artist's work at Baltic Contemporary in Gateshead combines the two.
 

A body blow of a show - Monica Bonvicini at the BALTIC
By Laura Cumming
A body blow of a show - Monica Bonvicini at the BALTIC
The Guardian November 27, 2016

Fierce, mordant and confrontational, Monica Bonvicini aims to annoy at every turn in this bracing first UK survey. 

S&M gear has kinks ironed out - Monica Bonvicini at the BALTIC
By Adrian Searle
S&M gear has kinks ironed out - Monica Bonvicini at the BALTIC
The Guardian November 21, 2016

Between the power drills, leather tassels and saucy builders’ humour, Italian artist Monica Bonvicini lets sadomasochism hang heavy in the air. But the audience frustratingly ends up neither master nor slave.

Talking Art, Sexuality & Exhibitionism With Monica Bonvicini
By Emily Gosling
Talking Art, Sexuality & Exhibitionism With Monica Bonvicini
AnOther November 18, 2016

The Berlin-based artist has built her practice around interrogating the notion of identity through art, as her expansive new exhibition at the Baltic demonstrates.

What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
By Will Heinrich
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
The New York Times November 10, 2016

GCC is a collective of eight young Arab artists — their name refers to an intergovernmental body called the Gulf Cooperative Council — and their work in “Positive Pathways (+)” at Mitchell-Innes & Nash was inspired by the growing popularity, in the Gulf states, of Western-style New Age healing systems. A hypnotically confident self-help voice-over plays in the gallery, and a nearly life-size plaster figure of a woman wearing a head scarf bends over a figure of a boy. We learn from the publicity release that she’s practicing Quantum Touch therapy, a reiki-like practice that uses the body’s life-force energy to promote wellness.

The Five Rising Artists You Must Know in 2016
BY KEVIN MCGARRY
The Five Rising Artists You Must Know in 2016
W Magazine November 2, 2016

“We wanted to make a work about the late-blooming New Age culture of the Gulf,” GCC explained via a group-sanctioned e-mail, “and how it is affecting everyone in the region, from conservative housewives to absolute monarchs toying with start-up culture.” The collective’s first Stateside gallery solo show is on view this month at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, in New York, reprising the Berlin installation alongside new work derived from YouTube videos of, among other things, modern-day healers on morning talk shows “making holistic remedies and products out of supermarket items.”

GCC: Critics' Picks
By Genevieve Allison
GCC: Critics' Picks
Artforum October 2016

GCC’s first exhibition with the gallery, which features multiple wall pieces, a sculptural installation, and sound work, is concerned with the evolution of various holistic practices—such as alternative healing and life coaching—that are gaining significant influence in Arab Gulf states. The eight artists who make up the collective are all strongly connected to the UAE and the Middle East, and their acronym loosely references that of the Gulf Cooperation Council. Here, they examine the multifocused, multifaceted synthesis of philosophies that fall under the rubric of “Positive Lifestyle” and the implications such Western, New Age ideas have in the context of the Gulf’s ultramodern, constitutionally Islamic societies.

GCC: Positive Pathways (+)
By Michael Wilson
GCC: Positive Pathways (+)
Time Out New York October 26, 2016

While the power of positive thinking—a popular if fuzzily defined lifestyle credo coined by author Norman Vincent Peale—is a familiar idea to most Americans, the slogan (if not the concept) is largely unknown in the Middle East. In its Mitchell-Innes & Nash debut, the six-member Arab artist “delegation” GCC (an allusion to the Gulf Cooperation Council) focuses on the growth of Cali-style personal realization in its part of the world—and what may get lost in translation. It’s an intriguing subject, but while this exhibition expands on a previous project for the most recent Berlin Biennale, it still barely scrapes the surface.

Running in Circles: Positive Vibes for the Middle East
By Thea Ballard
Running in Circles: Positive Vibes for the Middle East
Modern Painters October 19, 2016

“An ever-intensifying exposure to Western-centric global media has dulled the effect of existing taboos in the Gulf region,” the eight-member international art collective GCC — a tongue-in-cheek reference to the economic alliance known as the Gulf Cooperation Council — says in a joint statement. “As a result, a number of people there have become proponents of New Age lifestyles, whereas even 10 years ago, many would have probably disapproved of this and even deemed some aspects sacrilegious.”

Witness the Unsettling Power of GCC’s Positive Thinking
By Brian Boucher
Witness the Unsettling Power of GCC’s Positive Thinking
Artnet News October 17, 2016

“The idea of happiness is insidiously used to quell dissent,” GCC member Fatima Al Qadiri told me on the exhibition’s opening day on Thursday, at New York’s Mitchell-Innes & Nash. According to the party line among the powers that be, if you’re unhappy, never mind actual social problems, she said: “You’re just not being positive!”

Miss General Idea dons her glad rags again
Press
Miss General Idea dons her glad rags again
The Art Newspaper October 13, 2016

Miss General Idea, the fictional character created by the Canadian artist group General Idea, will make her Latin American debut at the Museo Jumex in Mexico City this month. She features prominently in the group’s 1970s works, which parodied the art world and mimicked popular culture by appropriating mainstream magazine formats and staging campy beauty pageants. 

Jessica Stockholder
By Evan Moffitt
Jessica Stockholder
Frieze September 29, 2016

Kitty litter and coffee mugs, painted fur and tyre scraps: the materials lists for Jessica Stockholder’s sculptures read like the home inventory of a mad packrat. For three decades, Stockholder has taken as provocation that cliché ‘everything and the kitchen sink’ – incorporating even plumbing into anarchic assemblages that resolve as astonishingly balanced formal compositions. Exuberantly colourful and formally promiscuous, her work is deliriously enjoyable to look at.

Another Banquet: Jessica Stockholder Offers Food For Thought at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
By Ella Coon
Another Banquet: Jessica Stockholder Offers Food For Thought at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
ArtNews September 27, 2016

In “The Guests All Crowded Into the Dining Room,” her show at Mitchell-Innes & Nash in Chelsea, Jessica Stockholder playfully probes the intersection of edibility and sociability through a set of colorful assemblages. 

25 Most Collectible Conceptual Artists: Mary Kelly
By Art+Auction
25 Most Collectible Conceptual Artists: Mary Kelly
Blouin ArtInfo September 26. 2016

The godmother of feminist art, Kelly is known for her provocative films and large-scale narrative installations that explore notions of sexuality, work, power, and politics by tapping into the more visceral aspects of daily life..."Kelly is one of the most important female Conceptual artists of our time,”says L.A. gallerist Susanne Vielmetter, who represents the artist along with New York–based Mitchell-Innes & Nash, and Pippy Houldsworth Gallery of London. 

Jessica Stockholder
By M. Donovan
Jessica Stockholder
Art Observed September 23, 2016

In The Guests All Crowded Into the Dining Room, Jessica Stockholder’s scattered arrangements of sculptural elements play with assumed boundaries to become a fluid meditation on space.  Through a variety of materials and forms, Stockholder avoids overtly breaking down traditional artistic lines, so much as she highlights that they have never truly existed at all. 

5 Female Artists You're Going To Want To Check Out This Fall
By Tess Kessler
5 Female Artists You're Going To Want To Check Out This Fall
Milk September 22, 2016

In her third solo exhibition at the Mitchell-Innes & Nash gallery, Stockholder presents a multitude of studio pieces as well as a single “large-scale site-responsive installation.” By way of both found and bought materials, Stockholder reimagines the use and positioning of common objects in various bright colored displays. Think random, seemingly uninteresting items, like metal parts and yellow plastic pieces, curiously assembled to create a work that re-examines the relationship between materials.

12 Women of Abstract Expressionism to Know Now
By Sarah Cascone
12 Women of Abstract Expressionism to Know Now
Artnet News September 17, 2016

Today, Jay DeFeo ranks among the better-known female artists of the era, but only after flying under the radar for many years. Best-known for her monumental painting The Rose, which is 10 feet tall, almost a foot thick, and weighs over a ton, DeFeo was the subject of a long-overdue retrospective organized by New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art in 2012–13.

8 Can't-Miss Fall Art Shows In New York
by Meredith Mendelsohn
8 Can't-Miss Fall Art Shows In New York
1stdibs September 12, 2016

In Jessica Stockholder’s first show at Mitchell Innes and Nash since 2012, the pioneering mixed-media artist presents a new series of her curious hybrids. She makes her pieces by combining found and purchased objects, then altering and embellishing them with her own artistic materials, adding paint, string and the like. 

Editors' Picks: 8 Art Events to See in New York This Week
By Kevin Umaña
Editors' Picks: 8 Art Events to See in New York This Week
Artnet News September 12, 2016

The artist is presenting “a large-scale site-responsive installation” as well as repurposed works of found materials using tire scraps, rusty hinges, roofing tile, and other such objects ripe for reinvention for her third show at the gallery. The installation, which is a winding yellow-and-white viewing platform, puts gallery-goers at eye level in order to see a selection of elevated drawings “with a splash of color” in closer detail.

What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
By Ken Johnson
What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week
The New York Times September 8, 2016

Jessica Stockholder’s colorful assemblages of diverse store-bought and found objects call to mind a term from neuroscience, “multisensory binding.” The phrase refers to the fact that the outer world appears to us seamlessly coherent, despite the many sensory signals streaming in from diverse sources — eyes, ears, nose, tongue and skin. Usually we don’t notice how the mind binds together these different inputs. In Ms. Stockholder’s engaging, if not wildly exciting, show of sculptures at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, your awareness of your attention’s shifting between the disparate parts and the whole composition is essential.

Bienal De Sao Paulo Explores Themes of Chaos and Uncertainty
Press
Bienal De Sao Paulo Explores Themes of Chaos and Uncertainty
Artnet News September 6, 2016

Artist Pope. L has a much-buzzed about performance for the biennial slated for September 7. Baile is described by the artist as “a physical vocabulary developing in response to the city and the manifestations (or protests) that occur. It’s the idea that no matter how desperate the politics, the party will go on.”

The Party We Are All Invited To
By John Yau
The Party We Are All Invited To
Hyperallergic September 4, 2016

Stockholder’s work — a mixture of the made, bought, found, and painted: domestic objects, toolbox goodies, backyard decks, urban markers, and, most recently, a multi-purpose stage-set, viewing platform and pedestal – is inventive, practical, funny and very down-to-earth.

The Body Electric
By John Dorfman
The Body Electric
Art & Antiques September 2016

Tom Wesselmann combined sensuality and joy with a deep investigation of the nature of represenational art. 

Feeling gravity's pull: Jessica Stockholder's stacked works at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
By Allison Young
Feeling gravity's pull: Jessica Stockholder's stacked works at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
Wallpaper* August 31, 2016

Creased, tied, folded, pierced, draped and bound: the repertoire of operations that Jessica Stockholder applies in her handling of found and manufactured materials is seemingly infinite.
Blurring the boundaries between painting, sculpture and architecture, Stockholder’s current exhibition at Mitchell-Innes & Nash emphasises process, form, and, above all, gravity.

Everyday Abstraction: A Q & A with Jessica Stockholder
by Taylor Dafoe
Everyday Abstraction: A Q & A with Jessica Stockholder
Blouin ArtInfo August 26, 2016

Jessica Stockholder’s work is difficult to talk about because it eschews so many of the typical classifications we use to discuss contemporary art: “installation,” “site-specific,” “ephemeral.” Indeed, that’s one of the most central elements of her practice: the dissolving of boundaries.
Look no further than her immersive new show at Mitchell Innes & Nash, “The Guests All Crowded Into the Dining Room.”

9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week
by The Editors of ARTnews
9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week
ArtNews August 22, 2016

On view will be more of the Chicago-based artist’s oddball installations, which typically assemble various colorful, unlike objects. You could easily be tricked into thinking that these are all found objects, and that Stockholder put them all herself, but not so—she often deliberately selects her objects and relies on readymade materials.

The Most Famous Pop Artist You Don't Know
by Kevin Conley
The Most Famous Pop Artist You Don't Know
The New York Times August 22, 2016

Tom Wesselmann’s paintings alienated some in the ’70s and
’80s, but his wholesome eroticism looks remarkably fresh today.

The New York art world of the ’60s can seem impossibly small to us now, almost sitcom-size. Everybody knew everybody, drinking and arguing and exchanging ideas in their now anachronistic suits and ties: Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein and James Rosenquist, Robert Indiana and Claes Oldenburg and a guy named Tom Wesselmann, the most famous artist that you don’t know.

Pope.L gets conceptual with slavery play at Drawing Center
by Dan Duray
Pope.L gets conceptual with slavery play at Drawing Center
The Art Newspaper August 15, 2016

Ahead of his show at New York’s Drawing Center in 2018, the artist Pope.L held a workshop this summer with writers, curators and others to preview and discuss his staging of a play written by a former slave.

Blouin ArtInfo
Press
Blouin ArtInfo
Datebook: GCC Artist Collective's New Exhibition at Mitchell-Innes & Nash July 28, 2016

“Positive Pathways (+),” an exhibition of works by artist collective GCC, will be on display at Mitchell-Innes & Nash in New York from October 13 through November 26.

The New York Times
Inside Art by Robin Pogrebin
The New York Times
Arabian Group Show July 14, 2016

The collective GCC, composed of eight artists with ties to the Persian Gulf, was formed in 2013 during Art Dubai and has since shown at institutions like the New Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art and MoMA PS1.

An Archive on Homelessness and the Housing Crisis Brought to Life
By Seph Rodney
An Archive on Homelessness and the Housing Crisis Brought to Life
Hyperallergic July 1, 2016

Into this fray comes Martha Rosler’s exhibition If you can’t afford to live here, mo-o-ove!!, at Mitchell-Innes & Nash. The title is a quotation from former New York City Mayor Ed Koch, who allegedly said this when confronted about the city’s housing problems. The show is full of umbrage, disillusionment, and rage, but also humor and clear-eyed assessment of the entire suite of difficulties involved in housing. The show is said to be the presentation of the Temporary Office of Urban Disturbances, which sounds like an ad hoc name for the group of curators and artists who have helped Rosler revisit her pioneering project If You Lived Here…. Taking place in 1989, If You Lived Here… examined similar themes and was originally shown at the Dia Art Foundation in three parts; the current project is also divided into three parts, the first two of which were shown at the New Foundation Seattle earlier this year.

Best in Show
by Linda Yablonsky
Best in Show
Artforum June 20, 2016

“You have to see Pope.L’s performance,” Art Basel director Marc Spiegler told me. It was scheduled for 6 PM. That was now. I ran for the Mitchell-Innes & Nash–sponsored room—and fell in behind a man dressed in a white gorilla suit (the artist).

Followed by an annoying film crew, and watched by expectant iPhone- and iPad-wielding curators, critics, collectors, advisors, and dealers, the silent Pope.L opened and closed a clear plastic umbrella, climbed and descended from a white kitchen stepladder, picked up a white satchel and walked around the space, inspecting the paintings (his) on the walls. When he pulled at one canvas, a thick wad of cash fell into his hand. He put it in the satchel. He repeated this action twice, then took a small white sculpture of a Paul McCarthy–like gnome out of his bag, placed it on the floor, and left the room.

The New York Times
by Robin Pogrebin
The New York Times
At Art Basel, Upbeat Dealers and Brisk Sales June 19, 2016

Nicholas Baume, the director and chief curator of the Public Art Fund, said he was particularly struck by Pope.L’s performance at Unlimited’s opening, in which the artist wandered through the fair in a white gorilla suit before departing in a white limousine.

Martha Rosler in Art in America
Press
Martha Rosler in Art in America
by Cathy Lebowitz June 17, 2016

Martha Rosler is known for disrupting the standard exhibition format. She staged a giant garage sale in the atrium of New York’s Museum of Modern Art for her first solo there in 2012. Her current show at Mitchell-Innes & Nash reprises an ambitious project, titled “If You Lived Here,” at New York’s Dia Art Foundation in 1989. Each show in the series of three explored one issue—tenant struggles, homelessness, urban planning—presenting works by artists, filmmakers, squatters, children, and community groups, among others.

For this exhibition, which contains a section on each of the original themes, Rosler has subsumed herself under the name Temporary Office for Urban Disturbances to collaborate with scores of groups—such as 596 Acres, Inc., Center for Urban Pedagogy, New York City Community Land Initiative—and individuals, including LaToya Ruby Frazier, Gregory Sholette, and Robbie Conal. In addition to the dense hanging of artworks, posters, and other archival materials, along with an area to read books and watch videos, the exhibition features four town-hall discussions to examine pressing concerns about city life now.

Apollo
Rakewell
Apollo
Monkey business comes to Art Basel June 13, 2016

Art Basel is around the corner and excitement is feverish. For his sins, the Rake is giving it a miss this year (all that mountain air feels a bit too healthy) but his Swiss moles are keeping him in the know. Among the more intriguing pieces of literature to have come their way is an announcement from New York gallery Mitchell-Innes & Nash, heralding a new performance piece called The Problem by American artist Pope L.

Phaidon
Press
Phaidon
Watch out for this guy (and his limo) at Art Basel June 9, 2016

Pay peanuts and you get monkeys, the old idiom goes. Yet a new great-ape performance at this year’s Art Basel seems to suggest hard cash remains a motivating factor among some primates.

The Chicago performance artist Pope.L will stage his new performance, The Problem, to open the Unlimited section of Art Basel, which takes place in the Swiss city 16 – 19 June. Here’s how his gallery, Mitchell-Innes & Nash, describes the piece.

“A white gorilla emerges from a white stretch limo at the entrance of the fair. Spilling white plantains onto the ground, the gorilla enters Unlimited, and wanders through the convention centre, looking for something. The beast drops more white things as it wanders. Eventually, the entity finds what it is looking for: an exhibition space containing a set of paintings called Circa by the famous negro artist Pope.L. The gorilla ignores the paintings and searches behind them, finally extracting five fat stacks of currency. The creature exits, leaving behind a garden gnome painted completely white except for a black-faced nose.”

SCENE: The Guide
Press
SCENE: The Guide
Gotham Magazine May 2016
Critics Pick: Tom Wesselmann at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
By Noah Dillon
Critics Pick: Tom Wesselmann at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
Artcritical May 2016

I’d basically written Tom Wesselmann off as merely a prurient artist of T&A spectacle. Although his retrospective survey now at Mitchell-Innes & Nash hasn’t totally won me over, it is amazing to see him more fully represented. His relief works are startling, and give a deeper appreciation to his association with Pop art.

This Season in Art
Laura De Gunzberg
This Season in Art
Cultured May 2016

"I'm really looking forward to the Tom Wesselmann show at Mitchell-Innes & Nash in New York.  He was a giant of /60s Pop Art, and his work-vibrant female nudes and magnified objects-was ahed of its time.  Event today it is quite contemporary.  The gallery, which represents him, is hosting the show through May 28".

Must-Do
Press
Must-Do
Harper's Bazaar April 2016

Tom Wesselmann's prismatic Pop paintings are on view at New York's Mitchell-Innes & Nash gallery, from April 21 - May 28.

8 Must-See Spring Art Exhibitions
By Meredith Mendelsohn
8 Must-See Spring Art Exhibitions
Architectural Digest May 9, 2016

The first retrospective of the painter’s work in New York since his death in 2004 is organized in collaboration with his estate, which means an opportunity to see a grouping of pieces not often shown together. The selection includes fantastic examples of paintings he made between 1961 and 2004, including still lifes, landscapes, and nudes—three traditional genres that he infused with his juicy, Pop sensibility.

Tom Wesselmann
Press
Tom Wesselmann
The New Yorker May 10, 2016

An entertaining attempt to boost the reputation of the Pop-art paladin, who died in 2004, soft-pedals his specialty of pneumatic nudes in favor of the inanimate: foodstuffs, household appliances, cigarettes, a Volkswagen Beetle. Wesselmann’s grabby colors beguile, and he had a winning way with shaped canvas, cutout metal, and vacuum-molded plastic. Nonetheless, all the images and forms still orbit the rejoicing sensuality of the “Great American Nude,” as the artist called his signature theme—monumentalized breasts, lips, and feet, like an explorer’s happy sightings of a carnal Xanadu.

Amanda Ross-Ho Uses Shifts in Scale and Material to Jar Us Awake
By Katy Donoghue
Amanda Ross-Ho Uses Shifts in Scale and Material to Jar Us Awake
Whitewall May 13, 2016

Looking at work by the artist Amanda Ross-Ho can feel a bit dizzying, and that might be something she’s going for. Since she moved to L.A., her art has become a lot about her studio practice, about creating a loop of the micro and macro aimed at giving viewers a sense of vertigo that makes them want to look closer, hyper-aware of their surroundings. Ross-Ho uses shifts in scale or material to jar us awake. 

16 New York Exhibitions to See This Spring
by Samantha Yudin
16 New York Exhibitions to See This Spring
ArtMuse May 13, 2016

Tom Wesselmann is one of the fathers of Pop Art. Using collage, assemblage, and iconic shaped canvases Wesselmann created a new vocabulary of painting entirely.

Anne McNally's Social Circuit Diary: May 2016
By Anne McNally
Anne McNally's Social Circuit Diary: May 2016
Vanity Fair May 13, 2016
It’s spring in New York, and that means the social calendars of certain of the city’s movers and shakers have thawed out and are now crowded with openings, benefits, auctions, previews, premieres, galas, and more. Anne McNally, a veteran of this elevated circuit, has been taking notes throughout her travels and will be sharing the social intelligence she’s gleaned with VF.com readers from time to time.

 

Tom Wesselmann's Painted Seduction
by Blake Gopnik
Tom Wesselmann's Painted Seduction
artnet news Thursday, May 5

A lot of the best Pop art was as much presentational as representational. It was about pointing at things in the world (“ostension," my current favorite term) rather than how seductively those things might be portrayed as art. From the beginning, the paintings of Tom Wesselmann were a bit of an exception to that rule, as is clear in the little survey now on view at Mitchell-Innes & Nash gallery in New York.

Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Two, 2012
Press
Knight’s Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation, Episode Two, 2012
Art Journal

Since the rise of appropriation in American art of the 1980s, the strategy has become so commonplace as to evade continued examination as a unique vein of artistic practice. At the same time, recurrent intellectual property battles around appropriative gestures in contemporary art have threatened its viability, giving rise to College Art Association’s important report published in February 2015, the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts. This three-part essay on the work of Karl Haendel, an LA-based artist best known for his arrangements of meticulously rendered drawings of found photographic imagery, connects three moments in his early career related to issues of artistic and cultural heritage and power. The first two episodes directly involve knights. Taking Haendel’s work as a point of departure and considering the digital turn, the essay as a whole examines how the operations, effects, and reception of appropriation have changed in recent decades and discovers what may be the strategy’s longest-lasting politics of signification. “Episode One” considered Haendel’s early project of reconstructing works by the minimalist sculptor Anne Truitt, including Knight’s Heritage (1963). This second text examines Haendel’s confrontation with another artist of an older generation, the early postmodernist Robert Longo.

A Brilliant Burst of Pop
By Marwan Naaman
A Brilliant Burst of Pop
Selections April 26, 2016

 Catch the dazzling Tom Wesselmann retrospective in Manhattan.

Tom Wesselmann is perhaps one of the world’s most iconic pop artists. His work is often compared to that of Andy Warhol, with some critics even saying that Wesselmann represented pop art more succinctly than any of his contemporaries.

12 Must-See Art Shows Opening This Week
By Gary Pini
12 Must-See Art Shows Opening This Week
Paper Magazine April 20, 2016

Mitchell-Innes & Nash (534 West 26th Street) opens the first major painting retrospective in NYC by the late artist Tom Wesselmann on Thursday, April 21, 6 to 8 p.m. The gallery hopes to "show how the artist has filtered the canonical subjects of art -- still life, the nude and the landscape -- through a unique and personal lens." On view until May 28.

From magazine cut-outs to brand-name billboards, gallery show offers a peek into Tom Wesselmann's estate
GABRIELLA ANGELETI
From magazine cut-outs to brand-name billboards, gallery show offers a peek into Tom Wesselmann's estate
The Art Newspaper April 19, 2016

Although he worked in a studio near Cooper Union right up until his death in 2004, the American Pop artist Tom Wesselmann has not had a major show in New York for more than a decade—until this week, when a dozen works drawn from the artist’s estate go on view at the Mitchell-Innes & Nash gallery (21 April-28 May).

Sarah Braman: You Are Everything
By Peter Plagens
Sarah Braman: You Are Everything
Wall Street Journal April 13, 2016

There’s apparently a new development in which artists such as Sarah Braman (b. 1970) include acknowledgments, like writers do at the end of novels. In the press materials for her industrially luscious show, it’s noted that “the artist would like to thank Steve Grant for his patience and skill in welding, Nina Weyl and Seth Coen for their tireless and careful sewing, Barb Hadden for so much studio help, Mom and Liz for all the babysitting, and Saul, Jody and Phil for being the best home team.”

Sarah Braman, ‘You Are Everything’
By MARTHA SCHWENDENER
Sarah Braman, ‘You Are Everything’
The New York Times April 8, 2016

A few blocks north of Sarah Braman’s exhibition “You Are Everything” at Mitchell-Innes & Nash is a rare sight: A defunct and shuttered McDonald’s restaurant on the corner of 34th Street and 10th Avenue. The title of Ms. Braman’s show comes from a graffiti tag on a similar-looking structure — red, yellow and white — in a rural location, a photograph of which is printed on the news release.

Campers, Sunsets, and Junkyards: Sarah Braman’s Containers of Light
by Rick Briggs
Campers, Sunsets, and Junkyards: Sarah Braman’s Containers of Light
Hyperallergic April 9, 2016

I’d call Sarah Braman’s show at Mitchell-Innes & Nash a breakthrough were it not for her slow and steady ascent. You Are Everything, her first solo New York City exhibition in five years, presents a newfound ease with her material, a gracefulness in both subject and physicality I hadn’t noticed before. It’s as if she had traversed the messy, awkward, early stages of self-conscious invention and emerged on the other side, fully confident and in total command.

David Ebony's Top 10 New York Gallery Shows for April
By David Ebony
David Ebony's Top 10 New York Gallery Shows for April
Artnet News April 8, 2016

Sarah Braman's sculptures and paintings are at once monumental and ethereal. She explores light and space with spare forms and a nonchalant, almost cavalier, manipulation of materials. Nothing she does ever seems over worked or overwrought. In her fresh and airy 3-D works, she combines found objects, often abject detritus, with carefully constructed forms made of tinted glass and steel.

MoMA Takes On the ’60s in a Welcome Shakeup of the Permanent Collection Galleries
By Roberta Smith
MoMA Takes On the ’60s in a Welcome Shakeup of the Permanent Collection Galleries
New York Times April 7, 2016

Now change has provocatively shaken up the Modern’s relatively undisturbed sanctum sanctorum: the grand permanent collection galleries, on the fourth and fifth floors, which are typically devoted to the Modern’s unparalleled holdings in the painting-and-sculpture department.

The installation of these galleries has long been the closely guarded aegis of one or two top curators in the department. Now the fourth floor — devoted to works from 1940 to 1980 — has been reinstalled by a collective of 15 curators from across the museum. Another departure: MoMA’s movement-by-movement, Eurocentric vision of Modernism has been replaced with a wide-angle focus on a single decade. “From the Collection: 1960-1969,” a yearlong presentation, zeros in on the overfetishized 1960s, when art and politics were in turmoil and interacted with a new force, and tells its story with work by more than 200 artists from around 20 countries.

The leveling determination is more convincing when the curators select as a representative for the unmentioned Op Art movement not Bridget Riley but the overlooked innovator Julian Stanczak and his “This Duel” (1963), his jazzy star turn in undulating black and white lines. Instead of including Frank Stella as the avatar of Minimalist painting, the honor goes to Agnes Martin and Jo Baer.

See You Are Everything
By Jerry Saltz
See You Are Everything
New York Magazine April 3, 2016

Sarah Braman, sensational sculptor.

In this solo show, Braman embraces a sort of dilapidated but still-loved found-sculpture aesthetic, assembling in beautiful agglomerations with tinted glass; wonderfully colored fabrics; and unruly discarded furniture, household items, and cut-up plywood. She arrives among Rachel Harrison, Mike Kelley, Richard Prince, and Donald Judd, putting a marker down as one of the strongest sculptors working anywhere. —Jerry Saltz
Mitchell-Innes & Nash, through April 16.

Body of Work: Tom Wesselmann
By Kate Guadagnino
Body of Work: Tom Wesselmann
Vogue April 1, 2016

Tom Wesselmann loved Matisse most of all, but, determined to go his own way, created splashy, adlike takes on traditional subjects that made him a reluctant star of the Pop Art movement. Yet while Warhol and Lichtenstein have had their due, an upcoming survey of Wesselmann's paintings at Mitchell-Innes & Nash will be the first of its kind in New York since the artist's death in 2004. "The hope is to reintroduce his work to a new generation," says Lucy Mitchell-Innes-- and, she adds, to pave the way for a major museum retropstective.

Karl Haendel
By Arielle Bier
Karl Haendel
Artforum March 29, 2016

Karl Haendel’s exhibition posits the practice of yoga as an alternative to accelerationism. Citing the anxiety around self-optimization, Haendel presents lifestyle- and body-enhancement products marketed to reinforce the need for self-betterment to question the ways these objects aid or inhibit our sense of self-worth and identity.

On Shifting, Empathy and Metaphorical Traveling
By Monica Uszerowicz
On Shifting, Empathy and Metaphorical Traveling
Ravelin Magazine March 2016

Photography that toes a line between documentary work and fine art may intrinsically contain half-truths, but that does not strip it of its sincerity, nor of its power. Kurland has carved out much of her career by finding the places and people she wanted to know; constantly traveling, her photographs of train-hoppers, the American west, and men or young women in the wilderness, are all of spaces and places she might not have belonged to initially, but came to know through a wonder that feels pure.

Heavenly Anarchy
by Marwan Naaman
Heavenly Anarchy
Selections Magazine March 15, 2016

Although the title of Sarah Braman’s latest solo exhibition is You Are Everything, the artist believes that there is, perhaps, a more appropriate title, one that better captures the spirit of her new work.

“I think the unofficial name for the show should be Driving, Sleeping, Screwing, Reading. It turned out that a lot of the sculptures either include beds or actually are beds where you can lay down,” Braman says. “My husband told me the studio looks like a sci-fi, post-apocalyptic tent city.”

Body Talk: Jacolby Satterwhite talks to Evan Moffitt about animation, sex and choreography
by Evan Moffitt
Body Talk: Jacolby Satterwhite talks to Evan Moffitt about animation, sex and choreography
Frieze March 11, 2016

Jacolby Satterwhite’s videos, made with the digital animation software Maya, are filled with seemingly infinite painterly detail. Their frames glide in axial movements like a joystick or drone. In his six-part film suite ‘Reifying Desire’ (2011–14), Satterwhite’s avatars dance and copulate on platforms floating in vast, star-speckled expanses of mottled purple and brown – a cosmic cyberscape governed by digital technologies that enhance and proscribe sexual pleasure.

Chocolate Factory
by Edward Dimendberg
Chocolate Factory
Artforum March 11, 2016

CALIFORNIA ABOUNDS WITH BEGUILING PLACE NAMES. The divergence between promise and reality may be no greater than in the case of the Chocolate Mountains. Stretching more than sixty miles across the Colorado Desert that traverses Riverside and Imperial counties in Southern California, they form a geography that few Californians have seen, let alone visited. Home to the Chocolate Mountain Aerial Gunnery Range, a practice site used by the Navy and Marines and inaccessible to the public, the region’s arid and inhospitable topography is magnified by the unsettling thought that somewhere over a distant crest shimmering in the heat the weapons that will be deployed in the wars of tomorrow are being tested today.

Pat O’Neill’s Where the Chocolate Mountains (2015) nimbly plays on these associations. Although we never actually see the mountains, we hear their name spoken by a character on the soundtrack of an old film noir, one of many elements that O’Neill transforms into a wholly new and vital substance, confirmation that he remains the master alchemist of Los Angeles experimental cinema. Instructional films, B movies, Caruso, and 1920s jazz are but some of the ingredients in a rich visual and sonic mix realized with his longtime collaborator, George Lockwood.

12 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before March 11
by Paul Laster
12 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before March 11
The Observer

New York-based artist Sarah Braman makes quirky sculptures by marrying found objects, constructed elements of colored glass and Plexi and oddly shaped pieces of plywood bearing brightly colored acrylics and spray paints. For her second solo show at the gallery, the artist uses a tree stump, a trashed truck cab, discarded bunk beds and fabricated glass structures to create eccentric assemblages.

Pope.L
After five years in Chelsea, Independent—a younger alternative to the other main fairs this week, the Armory Show and the ADAA Art Show—migrated downtown for its 2016 edition. The fair’s opening on Thursday, on four floors of Spring Studios, a massive eve
Pope.L
ARTNews March 5, 2016

After five years in Chelsea, Independent—a younger alternative to the other main fairs this week, the Armory Show and the ADAA Art Show—migrated downtown for its 2016 edition. The fair’s opening on Thursday, on four floors of Spring Studios, a massive event space with high ceilings and large windows letting in light from the West Side of Manhattan, had a crowd lining up around the block to get inside.

Our picks from the Independent fair
By Dan Duray
Our picks from the Independent fair
The Art Newspaper March 4, 2016

Mitchell Innes and Nash offers an array of works by the
multidisciplinary artist Pope.L. The stand’s centrepiece is a
sculpture, Coffin (Flag Box) (2008), an L-for-Liberty-shaped
rough wooden box that generates the uncomfortable sound of a
flag flapping. These are accompanied by a number of newer wall
works, the most interesting of which are shoe-box-sized—and
just as textural as they are textual—often with gesso or acrylic
smeared over the words. The words on the other hand are equal
part signifiers and signifying. Sad Cop Small Dog (2015) evokes
just what it needs to, and feels pretty groovy with is colourful
bubbly script—but, wait, why is it pinned to wood with pushpins?
And is that blood up on top? Tight works, to be sure.

Armory and Independent
By Sam Korman
Armory and Independent
Art Agenda March 4, 2016

The Independent is refreshing after a few hours at the Armory. The new location at Spring Studios in Tribeca is capacious, with lots of natural light, which slows the often overwhelming pace of these fairs. If its new digs feel a little corporate, it gives the art (and people) room to breathe. The effect is particularly strong with New York’s Mitchell-Innes & Nash’s solo presentation with Pope.L. Two massive works on paper, Black People Are Shit and Green People Are Hark (both 2012), spell out their titles in massive, block letters. The layers of paint meld the words to the paper, lending both a rippling weight. Nearby, a simple L-shaped coffin (Coffin [Flag Box], 2008) is partially supported by a book titled Birth of Nations, while the distorted sounds of a flag whipping in the wind plays through speakers inset to its walls. Google searches of the book mostly linked to the infamous, racist film The Birth of a Nation (1917), but I could not confirm its contents, or whether it was real or of the artist’s creation. Pope.L’s work has a gut-punch immediacy, and issues of race, alienation, and democracy break down
into a poetic and absurd interplay between identity, language, and materials.

Fresh New Digs for Aging Independent
By Chris Green
Fresh New Digs for Aging Independent
Art F City March 4, 2016

Pope L. lands like a piledriver from heavyweight Mitchell Innes & Nash. The gallery
is new to the Independent this year and presents the most coherent show of the fair. Pope L.’s work continues to be provocative and the sounds of flapping flags emerging from his 2008 Coffin (Flag Box) shook up an otherwise lethargic crowd at the opening. Canvases like Black People Are Shit (2012) are especially needed in such a privileged and white-washed venue.

10 Standout Painters to Discover From Independent New York 2016
By Karen Rosenberg
10 Standout Painters to Discover From Independent New York 2016
Artspace

One of the few political statements at the fair came from the veteran performance artist Pope.L (he recently dropped the "William" from his name), who combined abstraction with found objects steeped in racial caricature in this painting and invoked cops and doughnuts in other text-based works.

How the Independent Art Fair is Changing the Game
By Mark Guiducci
How the Independent Art Fair is Changing the Game
Vogue March 3, 2016

The continuity between the booths at Independent and the galleries themselves is as appealing to dealers as it is for the rest of us. Mitchell-Innes & Nash, which has in the past shown at the Armory and ADAA shows and which will present at Independent for the first time this year, is showing a solo booth of sculpture and paintings by performance artist Pope.L. “The gallery schedule is booked through at least 2017,” says Lucy Mitchell-Innes, referring to her West 26th Street space. “This is a mini show.” Taylor Trabulus, director of the understated Martos Gallery, agrees: “We think of Independent as more of a show than an art fair.” Martos will show work by artists experimenting in new mediums this weekend, including wallpaper by Michel Auder and sculptural chairs from painter Jess Fuller. Adam Lindemann’s Venus Over Manhattan gallery is bringing a solo booth of early work by California artist Peter Saul.

Studio Visit: Eddie Martinez
By Courtney Willis Blair
Studio Visit: Eddie Martinez
Forbes March 3, 2016

In a stunning exhibition at Mitchell-Innes & Nash titled Salmon Eye (Martinez’s wife’s name is Sam), nine new paintings sit squarely on the walls in the 3400-square foot white cube. An amalgamation of abstraction and figuration, the work is so quintessentially Martinez and yet wildly different from what we’ve expected from the Brooklyn-based painter. On a cold night of drizzle, we visited Martinez’s new studio in Bushwick. The duplex space was expectedly cold, filled with neatly cluttered spray paint cans and large crayons. And for an hour, we talked shop, hitting on topics from self-care to artistic influences to why his new work feels just a little bit lighter. Here’s what he had to say.

Knight's Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation
By Natilee Harren
Knight's Heritage: Karl Haendel and the Legacy of Appropriation
Art Journal February 29, 2016

Since the rise of appropriation in American art of the 1980s, the strategy has become so commonplace as to evade continued examination as a unique vein of artistic practice. At the same time, recurrent intellectual property battles around appropriative gestures in contemporary art have threatened its viability, giving rise to CAA’s important report published in February 2015, the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts. This three-part essay on the work of Karl Haendel, an LA-based artist best known for his arrangements of meticulously rendered drawings of found photographic imagery, connects three moments in his early career related to issues of artistic and cultural heritage and power. The first two episodes directly involve knights. Taking Haendel’s work as a point of departure and considering the digital turn, the essay examines how the operations, effects, and reception of appropriation have changed in recent decades and discovers what may be the strategy’s longest-lasting politics of signification.

Inspired by Pop Art, a Viennese Painter Explored Radical Change in 1960s New York
Press
Inspired by Pop Art, a Viennese Painter Explored Radical Change in 1960s New York
Artsy February 25, 2016

After a stint in California, Kogelnik—already a relatively accomplished abstract painter by her mid-20s—relocated to New York in 1961. It was a life-changing move. Not long after settling in her adopted city, Kogelnik met and befriended Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, and Robert Rauschenberg, whose collective influence on her was profound. While Kogelnik didn’t become a Pop Art painter herself, she took inspiration from many of the genre’s defining elements: figurative compositions, bold colors, and subjects that reflect contemporary culture.

Pope.L and Will Boone Featured
By Charlotte Boutboul
Pope.L and Will Boone Featured
Whitewall February 20, 2016

Through March 5th, Andrea Rosen Gallery will feature a dual exhibition
of Pope.L andWill Boone. Both conceptual artists will occupy the three-room Chelsea
space with respective video installations, sculptures, and paintings.
At a preview last month, Pope.L discussed his ontological fascination with words by
divulging the inspiration behind some of his pieces, notably, Cone in a Forest and Cone for My Sister (Private Language Problem) (2015), a large cone installation made of wooden sculpted letters.

Eddie Martinez
Press
Eddie Martinez
The New Yorker February 17, 2016

The Brooklyn artist’s big, rambunctious, terrifically friendly canvases collapse seven decades of painting, reviving styles of the Cobra painters (Alechinsky, Jorn, Appel) and adding hints from Americans (de Kooning, Guston, Basquiat, Wool). Martinez silkscreens blowups of his spontaneous drawings and then has at them with oils, enamel, and spray paint. There’s lots of white space, in which black lines and flavorful colors frolic, keyed to what Martinez describes as the Cobra “embrace of the child’s hand.” Does the art world sometimes feel like school? Welcome to recess!

Widewalls
By Angie Kordic
Widewalls
Colorist and Sculptor Sarah Braman to Present New Works at Mitchell-Innes & Nash February 16, 2016

Looking at the artworks of Sarah Braman, one can get a feeling that she’s like someone who is able to see certain things in a completely different way than regular folk. For instance, that sectioned old camper trailer is, indeed, exactly what it sounds, but it is also an artwork, placed on an art gallery floor like it’s always belong there, without any doubt. The truth is that the artist puts found objects together, in the manner of a proper Neo-Dadaist, creating art that is somewhere between sculpture and assemblage, ready to be contemplated by a contemporary viewer. Sarah Braman’s new sculptural works and panel paintings are soon going to be gathered for her first solo exhibition in New York in five years, hosted by Mitchell-Innes & Nash.

Art in America
by Daniel Belasco
Art in America
Keltie Ferris: In the Studio February 10, 2016

On the ocassion of her first East Coast museum solo, Brooklyn-based Keltie Ferris discusses her quest to produce "autonomous" body prints and abstract paintings-- exuberantly colorful works deteremined by their own formal dynamics rather than theory, market trends or aesthetic fashion.

Jessica Stockholder at Cleopatra's
By Paul Laster
Jessica Stockholder at Cleopatra's
The Observer February 8, 2016

Made when she was exiting grad school at Yale in the 1980s, the painted works on paper by Jessica Stockholder in this exhibition reveal a consistency in the artist’s practice, which focuses on the engagement of architecture, color and form. Rooted in Pictorialism, a late-19th century movement that emphasized artificial pictorial qualities, the works on view were made during the same period as the celebrated artist’s outdoor installation My Father’s Backyard, a seminal piece that saw the start of Ms. Stockholder’s unique style of fusing both painting and sculpture in the same work of art.

Eddie Martinez "Salmon Eye"
by Juliana Balestin
Eddie Martinez "Salmon Eye"
Purple.fr Feburary 2, 2016

A detail of new work by EDDIE MARTINEZ featured in his first solo exhibition with Mitchell-Innes & Nash. The large format paintings showcase Martinez’s bold brushstrokes and bold approach to traditional subject matter. For Salmon Eye, the artist builds upon his previous bodies of work by revealing a new dynamism in his narrative and deft approach to his canvases.

Top Ten
by Hanne Mugaas
Top Ten
Artforum February 2016

Kiki Kogelnik in 1966, Kogelnik said, "I'm not involved with Coca-Cola...I'm involved in the technical beauty of rockets," effectively distancing herself from Pop art. She was fascinated by the possibilities of the space age, with its new technologies and innovations in materials. 

Artist Martha Rosler in Seattle: Now We’re REALLY Angry?
By Jen Graves
Artist Martha Rosler in Seattle: Now We’re REALLY Angry?
The Stranger January 26, 2016

There’s news every week now of the mayor’s administration scrambling to find another parking lot or piece of land for more tent cities and car camps in Seattle. Meanwhile, Seattle is chockablock with massive real estate developments and fresh tech recruits. This is a state of emergency, as declared by the mayor in November.


A local philanthropist is bringing in backup. The backup is 72-year-old Martha Rosler, an artist and a fighter. In 1989, she commandeered the Spectacolor sign in Times Square in her home city in order to smear the commercial center with the ugly facts of the nation’s poverty and housing crisis. That public artwork was called Housing Is A Human Right, which is also the title of Rosler’s new year of exhibitions, talks, and workshops in Seattle, starting this weekend.

The year of Martha Rosler: Artist examines homelessness and disparity, wins $100K from Seattle foundation
By Tricia Romano
The year of Martha Rosler: Artist examines homelessness and disparity, wins $100K from Seattle foundation
The Seattle Times January 22, 2016

In a yearlong group of exhibits that will stretch across Seattle, internationally known multimedia artist Martha Rosler takes on big issues.


When Shari D. Behnke and Yoko Ott decided to create a prize for the New Foundation Seattle, they decided to go big. Really big. One hundred thousand dollars big.


“Well, we wanted an amount that would say something,” said Behnke, in a room at the foundation’s small, chic Pioneer Square gallery.

TOM WESSELMANN COLLAGES 1959-1964 EXHIBITION SOON AT
By Angie Kordic
TOM WESSELMANN COLLAGES 1959-1964 EXHIBITION SOON AT
Widewalls January 25, 2016

Before he was a prominent Pop artist and one of the leading figures of the movement, the late Tom Wesselmann was just another art student, trying his luck at the medium of collage. Over 30 of such works will soon be on view at David Zwirner Gallery in London, in an exhibition that will explore the early years of his fruitful career. These pieces, produced between 1959 and 1964, represent an introduction to the artist’s creative development and his dedication to the graphic and large-scale Pop imagery which he would come to make later on. In all their intimacy, they reveal the germination of his iconic style and affirm his lifelong interest in depicting interiors, still lifes, female nudes and landscapes.

‘I Needed to Figure Out Something I Could Make Myself’: A Talk With Eddie Martinez
by Bill Powers
‘I Needed to Figure Out Something I Could Make Myself’: A Talk With Eddie Martinez
ARTnews January 25, 2016
Pat O'Neill's "Let's Make a Sandwich"
by Leo Goldsmith
Pat O'Neill's "Let's Make a Sandwich"
Art Agenda January 21, 2016

Los Angeles-based artist Pat O’Neill has been making work for the last 50 years, and yet it’s rarely seen in New York. A key figure in West Coast experimental cinema, O’Neill is probably best known for highly plastic and technically accomplished films like his lysergic 7362 (1967) or his extraordinary 35mm feature Water and Power (1989), an experimental documentary concerning, among many things, the development of the Los Angeles Basin from prehistory to the present. But since the start of his career O’Neill has also been involved in an astonishing range of media—photography, sculpture, collage, and installation, in both commercial and independent spheres. Now in his late seventies, O’Neill is the subject of his first New York solo exhibition, which offers a concise but judicious sampling of his varied output.

Exhibition spotlights black visual culture
By Samuel Lee
Exhibition spotlights black visual culture
Yale Daily News January 20, 2016

the artwork on show includes rarely displayed collaged works on postcards by Wangechi Mutu ART ’00 from her personal collection, a site-specific installation in ink, pencil and wash on paper by Firelei Baez titled “Memory, Like Fire, is Radiant and Immutable,” and a video piece by William Pope.L where, dressed as Superman with a skateboard on his back, he crawls all the way to the Bronx from the base of the Statue of Liberty.

THE LOOKOUT
Press
THE LOOKOUT
Art in America January 14, 2016

Has the well of previously undiscovered L.A. artists (to East Coast audiences, anyway) run dry? Apparently not, as Pat O'Neill's New York debut attests. Two films, five sculptures and twenty-odd drawings by the California artist, made since the 1960s, reveal preoccupations with slick surface and surreal juxtapositions that resonate with the post-Internet sensibility.

Jessica Stockholder's "Door Hinges"
Press
Jessica Stockholder's "Door Hinges"
Art Agenda January 11, 2016

Jessica Stockholder is an artist known for breaking conventions. Though her sprawling artworks are often referred to as installations, she defines her manifold combinations of color and everyday materials as sculpture.

Jacolby Satterwhite: 30 Under 35
by Kat Herriman
Jacolby Satterwhite: 30 Under 35
Cultured Magazine 2016

The imagery in Jacolby Satterwhite’s work seems intuitive and fluid, yet the technical mediums the young artist uses are anything but. Often working with 3-D modeling and film, the artist creates immersive experiences that mesmerize. This year, his work appeared at the Brooklyn Museum and the Whitney as well as at the DIS-curated Berlin Biennale. Satterwhite is now working on pieces for New Museum and SFMOMA.

Kiki Kogelnik
by Sarah Wilson
Kiki Kogelnik
Artforum January 2016

“FLY ME TO THE MOON,” Britain’s first Kiki Kogelnik retrospective, complemented Tate Modern’s revisionist and staccato survey “The World Goes Pop.” Coinciding with Modern Art Oxford’s exhibition, Tate Modern showcased the work of female Pop artists who had been rediscovered during the past decade, including Kogelnik herself. 

Karl Haendel
By Wendy Vogel
Karl Haendel
Art in America January 2016

Los Angeles-based artist Karl Haendel, born in 1976, is part of
a generational cohort that breathed new life into 1980s appropriationist
strategies in various mediums. His Photo-Realist
draftsmanship recalls the technique of fellow Californian Andrea
Bowers, while his eye-catching installations evince a showmanship
shared by artists like Kelley Walker. Unlike Bowers, however,
whose labor-intensive drawings pay faithful homage to her source
images (of political protest and leftist movements), Haendel
portrays a more ambivalent attitude toward his hand-drawn reproductions
of mass-media and personal images. “Organic Bedfellow,
Feral Othello,” Haendel’s first solo show at Mitchell-Innes &
Nash, focused on human resistance to “devolution,” per the press
materials. But the works on their own evoked a richer set of
associations toward Haendel’s subjects—modernism, intimacy and
technology—than the exhibition’s rhetorical and visual scaffolding
would suggest.

LA Times
By Sharon Mizota
LA Times
Comic sights, mysterious sounds at Martin Kersels show December 22, 2015

ompared with his large sculptures and audaciously physical performances, Martin Kersels’ pieces at Redling Fine Art are a bit subdued, but not quiet. Three quirky wooden sculptures emit mysterious sounds to an audience of peeping-Tom portraits whose eyes gaze out meekly through holes drilled in planks of wood. The effect is riotously charming and comically odd, like a Dadaist hurdy-gurdy.

Top Ten
Thelma Golden
Top Ten
Artforum December 2015
Live Performance a Big Part of Miami Week
By Jordan Levin
Live Performance a Big Part of Miami Week
MIami Herald March 8, 2015

The Wednesday night opening of Art Public includes four performance pieces. In Chinese artist Yan Xing’s L’amour l’apres midi, young men in embroidered silks flirt with passersby. Xavier Cha’s supreme ultimate exercise contrasts bodybuilders hoisting truck tires with the flowing movement of a tai chi practitioner. In Ryan Gander’s Ernest Hawker, a fictional character, based on Gander, plays a drunken, washed-up artist. And Pope.L’s The Beautiful features black men with skateboards on their backs who crawl onto a stage to sing America the Beautiful. All will pop up unannounced from among the crowd at the park.

LA Weekly: 5 Shows You Should See
Press
LA Weekly: 5 Shows You Should See
By Catherine Wagley December 2, 2015

One of Martin Kersels’s new sculptures, installed at Redling Fine Art in a show called “Seen and Heard,” has a lever. Push it down, quickly, and it makes a groaning sound. On its way back up, it squeals. It’s all air pressure behind the noises. Kersels, who left L.A. to teach at Yale three years ago, calls the sculpture "Snore." Made of salvaged wood and assembled to look something like a phonograph, it conjures an antique — or an awkwardly rehabbed antique. The same can be said for the other two hand-operated, noise-making objects in the room: a bureau with a motor in its bowels and a leaning pyramid for a head, and a chair with a whirring wood box on its seat. All the “machines” go together and it’s this quaint fantasy of a pre-digital world, only none of Kersels analogue inventions have functions. They just have distinct looks and sounds.

Karl Haendel at Barbara Seiler Galerie
By Aoife Rosenmeyer
Karl Haendel at Barbara Seiler Galerie
Frieze December 1, 2015

Looking at images in Karl Haendel's exhibition Weeks in Wet Sheets, one might imagine stepping into a virtual space -- give the basic shapes cut out of cardboard that fill up the walls, the works' bright monochrome backgrounds and, not least, the impressive definition of Haendel's large-scale, photo-realist black-and-white pencil drawings-- but it's not like that. In reality you feel cardboard crumpling underneath your feet, see uneven pencil hatching within the works and notice cut edges of paper. The installtion is still awe-inspiring in its immersiveness, but while producing disjunctions between varying economies of speed, value and attention.

Martha Rosler Wins Seattle's New Foundation Inaugural 100K Prize
Lorena Muñoz-Alonso
Martha Rosler Wins Seattle's New Foundation Inaugural 100K Prize
Artnet News November 20, 2015

Martha Rosler has been named as the inaugural recipient of the 100K Prize, a biennial award given by The New Foundation Seattle (TNFS) to an influential, US-based female artist (including transgender women) to celebrate and reward her artistic achievements.

The non-profit organization TNFS was founded in 2012 by art collector Shari D. Behnke, and includes support programs for artists as well as public programs.

Martha Rosler First Winner of 100k Grant
Ryan Steadman
Martha Rosler First Winner of 100k Grant
Observer November 20, 2015

New Foundation Seattle, a non-profit arts organization founded by art collector Shari D. Behnke, has named Martha Rosler as the first recipient of its new 100K Prize.

The prize—as advertised—offers $100,000 in cold, hard cash and comes with zero restrictions (you can buy 100,000 dollar-pizza slices if you want).

“I am honored and delighted to be the first recipient of the 100K Prize from The New Foundation Seattle, an award instituted in recognition of women artists whose work has shown a commitment to social justice,” Ms. Rosler said in a press release.

Jacolby Satterwhite
by Meghan Dailey
Jacolby Satterwhite
W Magazine November 18, 2015

Years ago, Jacolby Satterwhite, who was featured in the 2014 Whitney Biennial, abandoned oil and canvas in favor of 3-D software and digital cameras, resulting in sexually coded, absurdist narratives featuring avatars, violence, and bodily fluids—not to mention himself, sometimes nude and often vogueing or hip-hop dancing. His latest work, En Plein Air, includes videos and photographic prints that attempt to capture the authenticity of real-life interactions. 

Pope.L returns to L.A. with twin gallery shows focused on race
By Sharon Mizota
Pope.L returns to L.A. with twin gallery shows focused on race
LA Times November 13, 2015

Following a powerful exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art this summer, the Chicago artist known as Pope.L, or just Pope.L, returns to Los Angeles with a show that sprawls across two galleries — Susanne Vielmetter in Culver City and Steve Turner in Hollywood — as well as the spaces in between.

The show at Vielmetter is titled “Forest.” At Turner, it's “Desert.” And Pope.L has created audio GPS tours for driving between the two. This emphasis on the space between is just one point of entry to an exhibition that includes drawings on Pop-Tarts, stuffed animals entombed in peanut butter and giant erasers. Throughout, Pope.L draws connections between interstitial spaces and our notions of blackness.

Outside the Fair, Public Art to Fill Miami’s Collins Park
By Alanna Martinez
Outside the Fair, Public Art to Fill Miami’s Collins Park
The Observer November 12, 2015

On the exhibition’s opening night on December 2 a series live performance works will light up the park. Revered performance artist Pope.L has prepared a version of his iconic “crawl” performance, this time featuring four men who will skate through the park laying on skateboards before crawling to a stage to sing America The Beautiful.

5 Must See Exhibitions in New York
By Scott Indrisek
5 Must See Exhibitions in New York
Artinfo November 6, 2015

The Los Angeles-based artist fills the space with intricate graphite drawings, in shaped frames, depicting both humans (engaged in various, partner-yoga-style contortions) and primates (often balancing quizzically atop stacks of Constructivist shapes). Tabletop arrangements flaunt additional drawings of health-and-beauty and self-improvement products (like Rembrandt tooth-whitening strips), along with hand-sketched QR codes that, when activated, lead to inspirational online videos “chronicling physical transformation.” The overall effect is of a delightful too-muchness, of strange links being forged between very disparate things — just what one might expect from an exhibition tongue-twistingly titled “Organic Bedfellow, Feral Othello.”

Karl Haendel
By Mercedeh Sanati
Karl Haendel
The Globe and Mail October 31, 2015

The exhibit, Organic Bedfellow, Feral Othello, features the photorealistic graphic drawings of Los Angeles-based artist Karl Haendel. But the show is as much about the art as it is about the immersive installation space. Black-and-white checked patterns bisect the gallery floor and the artist's still-life drawings of primates balancing on geometric stacks and couples contorting in yoga poses are propped on polygonal stands with hand-drawn QR codes. The codes link to YouTube videos that chronicle suchs physical transformation as weight-loss journey or gender transition. The exhibit is on show at Mitchell-Innes & Nash's Chelsea gallery until Dec. 5.

Jessica Stockholder
Press
Jessica Stockholder
Chicago Tribune October 28, 2015

Everything Jessica Stockholder touches turns to art.

Over the past three decades this has included worn-out couches, an urban intersection, refrigerator doors, a scissors lift, fresh oranges and lemons, a compact car, a mattress, a streetlight, a bathtub, a full-size freezer chest, half-a-dozen wooden dressers and a city park.

Review of Kiki Kogelnik: Fly Me to the Moon at Modern Art Oxford
by Laura Catsellis
Review of Kiki Kogelnik: Fly Me to the Moon at Modern Art Oxford
Aesthetica Magazine October 27, 2015

Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenberg, Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns. The giants of post-war American art are being reviewed once again; their replacement of high art with kitsch, brushstroke with Ben-Day dot and abstract expressionism with advertising is eerily prophetic of the current state of affairs. During its first lifetime, pop was maligned for glorifying consumerism; it has now been revised to acknowledge the biting cynicism that bristled beneath the smiles of Hollywood goddesses and the shiny veneer of muscle cars.

Regardless, the legacy of omission has continued unabated, as the largely unknown name Kiki Kogelnik (1935-1997) will attest. A contemporary of the aforementioned postmodern practitioners, the Austrian- born artist’s retrospective at Modern Art Oxford showed before several of her works go on display in The World Goes Pop exhibition opening at Tate Modern later this month.

Karl Haendel Exhibition in New York Investigates Relations Between Evolution and Devolution in a series of Amazing Drawing Installations
By Angie Kordic
Karl Haendel Exhibition in New York Investigates Relations Between Evolution and Devolution in a series of Amazing Drawing Installations
Widewalls October 23, 2015

Is our evolution our devolution? Or better yet – is our devolution our evolution? According to Karl Haendel, it’s both these things, as we can witness too by exploring his latest exhibition entitled Organic Bedfellow, Feral Othello, to be hosted by New York’s Mitchell-Innes & Nash. Through large, masterfully executed drawings set within a monochromatic installation, the Los Angeles-based artist takes humanity back to its roots, in order to better understand its development through time, keeping in touch with the present at the same time.

The New Yorker
by Jason Farago
The New Yorker
Keltie Ferris October 13, 2015

Until recently, the best way to prove you were a serious painter was to paint unseriously: mocking the medium, the way Polke or Kippenberger did, proved that you knew the rules of the game. That moment has passed. This bravura show by a leading figure of the new-new painting finds Ferris deploying an arsenal of techniques, from spray guns to impressions of her own body, in riotous soft-edged compositions. She eschews Ab-Ex mark-making for nongestural layers of color, airy mauve or honking goldenrod, interrupted at times by flowing circuits broken into patterns suggestive of pixels. This is the work of an artist who isn’t afraid to tell painting “I love you.” Through Oct. 17.

Artist Pope.L on Humor, Race and God
by Rachel Rivenc
Artist Pope.L on Humor, Race and God
The Getty Iris October 7, 2015

Pope.L has a prolific and polymorphous multi-media art
practice. In addition to his well-known performances, he creates
sculpture, installation, drawings, paintings, photography, video, and
writing. With seemingly inextinguishable curiosity and boundless
appetite, Pope.L absorbs every possible medium and explores the many
themes that are important to him with drollery, poetry, and a unique,
irreverent, inquisitive, and highly personal point of view. He once
described himself as “a fisherman of social absurdity.”

Vulture, New York Magazine
By Jerry Saltz
Vulture, New York Magazine
Keltie Ferris September 24, 2015

About eight years ago Keltie Ferris burst onto the New York painting scene like a bat out of hell, that is, if you define hell as the Yale M.F.A. painting program; back then, her large Day-Glo-colored canvases were perfect crosses between hazy 1970s Color Field painting, pixilated digital space breaking up and reforming in odd-shaped plates, and painterly abstraction at the same time totally avoiding any derivative overlap with artists like Kelly Walker or Gerhard Richter.

Time Out New York
By Joseph R. Wolin
Time Out New York
Keltie Ferris September 23, 2015

Keltie Ferris continues to make some of the jazziest abstract paintings around.  Several are absolute knockouts, combining blurred passages of spray paint with massed rectangular patches that suggest blown-up pixels created with a computer paint program. 

ARTINFO
By Scott Indrisek
ARTINFO
Body Consciousness: New Paintings and Prints by Keltie Ferris September 22, 2015

 “There's a weird culture where works on paper aren't respected the same way as paintings are,” said Keltie Ferris, walking through her latest exhibition at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, which pairs vibrant mixed-media canvases with more intimate body-prints. “This show is about whether these two bodies of work, which were feeling disparate, can hang together.

ArtNews
By Andrew Russeth
ArtNews
Keltie Ferris September 21, 2015

At Mitchell-Innes & Nash, meanwhile, Ferris continues to stake out her position as one of today’s finest abstract painter with ever larger, ever more exuberantly colored pieces, where shifting blurs compete with crisp, thick pointillist passages. Vibrating with punchy oranges, purples, and pinks, these paintings look like aerial views of futuristic cities, acid–inspired quilts, or glitch-laced JPEGs. Frankenthaler and Gilliam are forebears, but Ferris pushes, with great aplomb, beyond those influences, forging a style that feels bracingly, thrillingly fresh, and one in which space ambiguously slips and slides.

Keltie Ferris
by Prudence Peiffer
Keltie Ferris
Artforum September 19, 2015

La Estrella, [P]y[X]i[S], oRiOn: We’re caught up in the jumbled syntax of the heavens in Keltie Ferris’s dazzling show of ten paintings and six body prints, all from 2015. The constellations that lend their name to some of these canvases trace distinct forms but are composed of flickering stars whose boundaries are less clear to us down on Earth. And this is a central aspect of Ferris’s paintings, whose thin airbushed oil layers and dragged acrylic strokes build a rich color space (here, moving beyond the loose neon graffiti of her 2012–13 gallery show into deep purples, reds, ochers) that shifts in and out of focus. Are these shapes or are they impressions?

The New York Times
By Martha Schwendener
The New York Times
Keltie Ferris: Woman Warrior September 17, 2015

This has been a summer of women warriors: Serena Williams, Angela Merkel, Charlize Theron’s character in “Max Max: Fury Road,” and Shaye Haver and Kristen Griest, the first women to earn the United States Army’s elite Ranger designation. Now, in the final days of summer, painting’s warrior women are advancing, and Keltie Ferris is among them.

Press
Pictures of an Exhibition
ARTNews September 17, 2015

Today’s show: “Knifer, Mangelos, Vaništa” is currently on view at Mitchell-Innes & Nash in New York. The group show features work from Julije Knifer, Mangelos, and Josip Vaništa—the three founding members of the radical Croatian art collective the Gorgona group. The exhibition is on view at the gallery’s Upper East Side space through October 3.

Press
Jessica Stockholder: Door Hinges
Artforum September 2015

Jessica Stockholder has unveiled new work at several Chicago locations this fall, including a site-specific installation at the Smart Museum of Art as well as in her solo exhibition “Door Hinges” and the group show “Assisted".

Press
Jessica Stockholder: Door Hinges
Brooklyn Rail September 12, 2015

Wrapped around the dark gray exterior, a triangle painted with bands of vibrant color, a log, a segment of rope, an orange electrical cord, and two large convex safety mirrors reminded me of the visual dynamics of Fiorucci, the influential Manhattan fashion boutique that closed in 1986, just a few years before I would first encounter Stockholder’s work. Thanks to Google, I soon realized that the stylistic connection I had made on site wasn’t accurate at all, so it must have been the attitude of Stockholder’s bold on-the-street statement that provoked the association.

By Hilarie M. Sheets
Wesselmann's Nudes Uncovered at Show
The New York Times September 11, 2015

“Painting, sex and humor are the most important things in my life,” Tom Wesselmann once said.  He combined all three in the early 1960s “Great American Nude” series for which he became known, with epically scaled odalisques luxuriating amid the dazzling products of modern life. In April, Mitchell-Innes & Nash in Chelsea will present the first survey of his paintings in New York since his death in 2004, a show including the 10-foot-by-8-foot “Great American Nude No. 53” (1964) as well as his little-known late abstractions composed from painted cut-aluminum scraps.

Art in America
By Jason Stopa
Art in America
Painting's Full Arsenale: An Interview with Keltie Ferris September 10, 2015

Brooklyn-based painter Keltie Ferris creates marks—smeared, sprayed and hand-painted—that solidify or dissolve into abstractions with a sense of perceptual depth that allows for multi-dimensional readings. The 38-year-old artist returns to Chelsea gallery Mitchell-Innes & Nash for her second solo exhibition (Sept. 10-Oct. 17) with several new works created during her recent trip to Los Angeles.

The Observer
Press
The Observer
Keltie Ferris September 8, 2015

A former Yalie who has taken the art world by storm with her fizzy Technicolor abstractions, rising star Keltie Ferris is back with her second solo show at this gallery. The colorful exhibition will include 12 new abstract paintings that she made during a recent stay in Los Angeles, as well as several of the artist’s figurative body prints on paper. The large abstractions mix lively brushwork with bold spray painted areas, while the works on paper (inspired by the body prints of David Hammons) capture the imprint of Ms. Ferris’ clothed body with pigments and oils over a network of brushed, linear forms.

Daniel Lefcourt
By Aude Launay
Daniel Lefcourt
ZeroDeux Winter 2015-16

If its attempts to transcend its own condition as colour spread on a plane occupy a large part in its history, painting is nevertheless still a physical area from which to address the surrounding world. While the majority of Westerners henceforth spend most of their time with their eyes glued to a luminous rectangle —hi there, who you are reading this text humbly printed on paper—, painting, in the words of Daniel Lefcourt, allows slow-looking, and have the ability to speak of perception, of touch. It would be, more than ever, topical.

By Kyle MacMillan
Jessica Stockholder: A Merging of Mediums
Art in America September 2015

With exuberant, quirky and often kitschy creations, Jessica Stockholder has put a significant stamp on the medium of installation art.

Artspace
by Karen Rosenberg
Artspace
Keltie Ferris on Bringing the Sensual Human Body Into Her Post-Digital Painting August 21, 2015

This fall, Ferris’s paintings and body prints will be shown together for the first time in her second solo at Mitchell-Innes and Nash in Chelsea. As she prepared for that exhibition (opening September 10) and two other upcoming shows at the University Art Museum in Albany and Klemm’s in Berlin, Ferris welcomed Artspace's Karen Rosenberg to her Bushwick studio to talk about her embrace of body art and what it means for her paintings.

by Eileen Myles
Eleven Favorites
Paris Review Fall 2015
Review: ‘Image Object’ Looks at the Relationship Between the Virtual and the Physical
By Ken Johnson
Review: ‘Image Object’ Looks at the Relationship Between the Virtual and the Physical
The New York Times July 16, 2015

A Public Art Fund production organized by the fund’s associate curator, Andria Hickey, the exhibition presents sculptures by seven artists who have all exhibited internationally. It’s meant to address a particular condition of modern life: On the one hand, technologically mediated imagery constantly impinges on us from every direction; on the other, images are perpetually being turned into real things, like fancy cars and tall buildings. The exhibition’s introductory text panel explains, “As images are rendered into objects, and objects are circulated as images, the boundaries between the physical and the virtual are blurred, challenging us to rethink how we see the world around us.”

By Samuel Jablon
Pope.L on “Acting a Fool” and Alternative Futures
Hyperallergic July 10, 2013

Chicago-based artist Pope.L works in a variety of mediums, including painting, spoken word, installation, and performance, to challenge ideas of race and social stereotypes. His practice questions society’s claims on identity and the body. Pope.L has famously crawled all over New York City: for his piece “Tompkins Square Crawl” (1991), he climbed through the gutters of Tompkins Square Park in a suit, and in “The Great White Way,” he crawled the entire 22 miles of Broadway over a period of five years wearing a superman suit with a skateboard slung over his back. He has eaten an issue of the Wall Street Journal while sitting on a toilet in his piece, “Eating the Wall Street Journal” (2000). He copyrighted his personal slogan: “The Friendliest Black Artist in America©.” His paintings and sculptures often use a variety of white foods: mayonnaise, flour, and milk. Pope.L is a master of, in his words, “genre-hopping”; he does not sit still, he’s constantly in motion challenging ideas of who we are, what we are, and what it means to be American.

"Image Objects" Brings the Digital Outdoors
By Scott Indrisek
"Image Objects" Brings the Digital Outdoors
ArtInfo July 8, 2015

“Image Objects,” on view through November 20, brings digital culture to City Hall Park in New York. Organized by Public Art Fund and curated by Andrea Hickey — who also put together the sprawling group show “Objects Food Rooms,” currently on view at Tanya Bonakdar — the exhibition riffs on the complex interplay between two- and three-dimensions, between the computer-generated and the supposedly “real.” The artists on view, including Jon Rafman, Amanda Ross-Ho, and Lothar Hempel, all probe these unique tensions, often mixing cutting-edge technologies with old-fashioned materials. (Rafman, for instance, uses computer modeling software to create forms that are then hewn from marble.) In a conversation via email, I spoke with Hickey about how our obsession with sharing images of art on social media platforms is changing creative culture.

By Maggie Barrett
Brent Wadden
The Brooklyn Rail June 3, 2015

Stand inches away from a Brent Wadden canvas and the work takes on a similar monumentality to a Clyfford Still painting. The edge of a given shape seems to drop into a bottomless void. A few steps back, however, with the canvas in full view, these shapes form a pattern—those canyons are now part of a flat surface without depth. From this distance the eye skates from swatch to swatch, absorbing the variation in surface color and texture. All of the eight works on view oscillate, at times assuming the flat surface of a geometric design, at others, the depth of a landscape.

By Maggie Barrett
Brent Wadden
The Brooklyn Rail June 3, 2015

Stand inches away from a Brent Wadden canvas and the work takes on a similar monumentality to a Clyfford Still painting. The edge of a given shape seems to drop into a bottomless void. A few steps back, however, with the canvas in full view, these shapes form a pattern—those canyons are now part of a flat surface without depth. From this distance the eye skates from swatch to swatch, absorbing the variation in surface color and texture. All of the eight works on view oscillate, at times assuming the flat surface of a geometric design, at others, the depth of a landscape.

By Annie Buckley
Pope.L: LOS ANGELES, at Museum of Contemporary Art
Art in America June 2, 2015

Pope.L’s powerful exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art’s Geffen Contemporary subtly replaces passive viewing with multisensory experience. The show teems with possibilities for heightened sensation—smell, touch, vision and hearing—and draws on Pope.L’s decades of performance and video work to evoke the kinds of physical and psychical shifts a performer might experience. At the center of this selection of nine mixed-medium pieces dating from 1992 to the present is Trinket (2008/2015), a 16-by-45-foot American flag blown by four large industrial fans of the type used to simulate tornadoes on movie sets.

Pat O'Neill at Cherry and Martin
by Travis Diehl
Pat O'Neill at Cherry and Martin
Artforum June 2015

While Pat O’Neill is primarily known as an experimental filmmaker, this small retrospective, which filled two moodily lit galleries with five decades’ worth of sculptures, drawings, photographs, slides, and films, made a case for another, adjacent view of his practice—one concerned with fixed visual forms. In Untitled (Dingo 4), 1980, four identical gelatin silver prints of a dog appeared side by side, each overlain with a small photocopy that was partially obscured, in turn, by a different-colored paint chip—a frame-by-frame dissolve from color to color that recalled O’Neill’s movies.

Leigh Ledare
By Chris Kraus
Leigh Ledare
BOMB Magazine June 31, 2015

"... From Ledare's notorious case study of his immediate family in Pretend, to his manipulation of a fraught commission from a collector couple to photograph the wife in the nude in An Invitation (2012), Ledare's work pivots on his highly curated assemblage of documents that implicate all involved, not least himself.  As his collaborator Nicolás Guagnini wrote, "Neither critique nor utopia can be construed as such in this state of bitter lucidity ...[Ledare's work] confronts us with a montage of disenchantment and aesthetic gratification that stirs deep within us, but with a thick varnish of guilt." [...]
–Chris Kraus

By Zoë Lescaze
The Artist to Watch in 2016 Has Been Dead for 20 Years
Vulture May 28, 2015

The sculptures of Gonzalo Fonseca — hand-carved blocks of marble and limestone riddled with secret compartments, moveable pieces, mysterious emblems, and tiny staircases — look like Paleolithic dollhouses designed by M.C. Escher. They don’t quite make sense, but they radiate an internal logic so seductive it’s hard not to feel as though you once encountered them in a dream, wandering through the works like abandoned cities.
 

By Daniel McDermon / Roberta Smith
What to Do This Weekend
The New York Times May 28, 2015

See the excellent first show by Brent Wadden, a young Canadian-born painter who has set aside his brushes and taken up weaving, making thick rug-like abstractions whose jagged, interlocking shapes have the wobble of Op Art except softened by vagaries of color, texture and edge. The work resonates with the history of textiles and meets halfway the efforts of textile artists like Anni Albers and Sheila Hicks, who broached painting from the other side.

By Daniel McDermon / Roberta Smith
What to Do This Weekend
The New York Times May 28, 2015

See the excellent first show by Brent Wadden, a young Canadian-born painter who has set aside his brushes and taken up weaving, making thick rug-like abstractions whose jagged, interlocking shapes have the wobble of Op Art except softened by vagaries of color, texture and edge. The work resonates with the history of textiles and meets halfway the efforts of textile artists like Anni Albers and Sheila Hicks, who broached painting from the other side.

10,000 revolutions: meet Mary Kelly, the mother of all feminist artists
By William Fowler
10,000 revolutions: meet Mary Kelly, the mother of all feminist artists
The Guardian May 18, 2015

It’s good to have a vision. Even if it’s flawed, or turns out to be not what you expected.” Mary Kelly would know. As one of the world’s foremost feminist artists, she has pursued hers relentlessly for 45 years. It gives her a long view of the feminist movement that is refreshingly upbeat. “Something very wonderful has happened. If you look at how men engage with their children, it’s totally different. My husband Ray was the only man with a child in a backpack at the big demonstrations in the 70s. He used to get wolf-whistled picking our son up from school.”

By Terry R. Myers
Pope.L: Trinket
Brooklyn Rail May 6, 2015

“Twenty years ago all the ambitious young painters I knew in New York saw abstract art as the only way out.” This sentence, the start of Clement Greenberg’s 1962 essay “After Abstract Expressionism,” provides a particular way into Pope.L’s determined exhibition at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA. Those painters of the 1940s, to Greenberg at least, were trying to leave behind not so much representational art, given their relative commitment to the progressive aims of modernism, but more the visuality of illusion itself. Pope.L, like most of the critical artists of his generation, understood that those aims were just as oppressive of the potent interplay of abstraction, representation, and illusion that remains with us today, as they were of artists themselves. This exhibition presents a focused selection of key works of Pope.L’s that reinforce and reconfigure categories like painting, sculpture, performance, photography, and video in order, it seems, to maintain any way out of a category or situation as another way in, even if the entire show happens to be dominated by a work made with an enormous flag of the United States of America.

REVIEWS: Karl Haendel: "Unwinding, Unboxing, Unbending, Uncocking" at Night Gallery
By Jody Zellen
REVIEWS: Karl Haendel: "Unwinding, Unboxing, Unbending, Uncocking" at Night Gallery
art ltd. May / June 2015

Unpacking the exhibition's title gives clues to deeper meanings.  Without the "un" there are boxes, bends, cocks and wind.  The use of "un" features letters of the same shape, bent in opposite directions, signs for the yin/yang, push/pull--dialectal relationships within the exhibition.  Haendel creates a narrative that weaves through the disparate groupings and can be read in any sequence.  While the exact nature of the narrative remains ambiguous, it is sifted through the lens of astrology, yoga poses and the interconnectedness of mind and body.  The result is an evocative and challenging installation, comprised of individual elements whose meaning when seen in relation to each other is simultaneously finite and open-ended.

NEW YORK ODYSEEY: The Whitney reëstablishes itself downtown
By Peter Schjeldahl
NEW YORK ODYSEEY: The Whitney reëstablishes itself downtown
The New Yorker April 27, 2015

Whitney decided to open her own museum, on West Eighth Street, in 1931, and appointed Force its director. Since then, seven directors have overseen the growth of the collection, which now contains twenty-two thousand items, seventeen thousand of them works on paper. There are such touchstones as Alexander Calder’s “Circus” (1926-31), Arshile Gorky’s “The Artist and His Mother” (1926-36), Jasper Johns’s “Three Flags” (1958), Jay DeFeo’s massive relief “The Rose” (1958-66), Willem de Kooning’s “Door to the River” (1960), Nan Goldin’s slide-show installation “The Ballad of Sexual Dependency” (1979-96), and Mike Kelley’s caustic stuffed-animal array “More Love Hours Than Can Ever Be Repaid” (1987). But the collection lacks depth in most major artists, with the important exception of Edward Hopper. The Whitney has the largest concentration of his art anywhere, including such paintings as “Railroad Sunset” (1929) and the storefront epiphany “Early Sunday Morning” (1930), along with more than twenty-five hundred drawings. By ever more general agreement, Hopper is this country’s painter laureate, or, as De Salvo calls him, “our Picasso.”

By Hannah Ghorashi
9 ART EVENTS TO ATTEND IN NEW YORK CITY THIS WEEK
ARTnews April 21, 2015

Brent Wadden’s show (his first solo exhibition in New York) at Mitchell-Innes & Nash features eight new woven paintings by the Canadian, Berlin-based artist. What is a woven painting, you ask? It’s essentially a tapestry that thinks it’s a painting. A press release elucidates: “His abstract works complicate the painterly notion of surface, while reconsidering the concept of the handmade…the artist’s focus on form seeks to reinterpret traditional gender roles in art-making and craftsmanship.” Reinterpreting gender roles! Exciting

By Whitney Millar
Brent Wadden's Woven Paintings: Analogue download
NUVO April 21, 2015

The process in completing one of his “paintings” is quite time-consuming: a three-panel piece takes just under a week to finish. Having received only one introductory lesson and a laser-cut backstrap loom from Travis Meinolf of Action Weaver, Wadden is an otherwise self-taught weaver who avoids learning any proper skills. “This naiveté works to my advantage when seen through the lens of painting,” Wadden says. “The mistakes are charming.” Though, he admits, they “probably make a skilled weaver’s hair stand on end.”

By Nate Freeman
10 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before April 24
New York Observer April 20, 2015

The Canadian artist just joined the Mitchell-Innes & Nash roster last year, and for his first show with the gallery—and his first solo show in New York—he’s putting up eight of his woven paintings.

By Roberta Smith
10 Galleries to Visit in Chelsea
New York Times April 16, 2015

Ten minireviews can’t do justice to Chelsea’s art offerings. MITCHELL-INNES & NASH has a museum-quality, nearly comprehensive show of Joseph Beuys’s multiples (at 534 West 26th Street, through Saturday).

By Adrienne Alpert
New MOCA flag exhibit waves democracy in
ABC News March 28, 2015

An American flag half the size of a football field is the centerpiece of a new exhibit at the Geffen Contemporary at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Little Tokyo.

The 50-foot long piece constantly waves by the force of four huge industrial fans under bright lights that go on and off.

But this is no ordinary oversized flag. Its field is longer and the ends are frayed. The union bears 51 stars, not 50.

It is not so much Old Glory, as much as a new glory envisioned by the artist Pope.L.
 

Press
Joseph Beuys Multiples
The New Yorker March 27, 2015

The German social sculptor looks less hermetic than usual, thanks to the show’s emphasis on his political activities, notably his Organization for Direct Democracy, which advocated decision-making via citizen referenda. (“Conquer the dictatorship of the parties!” he scrawled on a photograph of himself wielding a silver broom.) Beuys designed the German Green Party’s campaign poster in 1979 (he was also one of its losing candidates). It shows a giant hare, one of the artist’s favorite symbols, facing down an infantryman—its title is “The Invincible.” Through April 18.

By Christopher Knight
Pope.L sets the U.S. flag waving at the MOCA/Geffen
Los Angeles Times March 24, 2015

"Trinket" is a monumental 2008 installation sculpture by Newark-born, Chicago-based artist Pope.L, 59, that put the disheartening display of media-mad political theater into devastating perspective. Centered on Old Glory, its title references the lapel pin. [...]

Pat O'Neill plays fast and loose at Cherry and Martin
By David Pagel
Pat O'Neill plays fast and loose at Cherry and Martin
Los Angeles Times March 21, 2015

If computers could dream, Pat O’Neill might be their Sigmund Freud. His multilayered films, sculptures, collages and drawings — in a mesmerizing mini-survey at Cherry and Martin — seem to be made from the deleted files, trashed photos and lost messages that are beyond the reach of our phones and notebooks but still out there in the ether, with the capacity to come back to haunt us, sometimes savagely.

By Hannah Ghorashi
'It's the Ghost of Joseph Beuys!' A Walkthrough at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
Artnews March 19, 2015

Opening today, Mitchell-Innes & Nash presents an exhibition of Fluxus artist Joseph Beuys’s multiples from the collection of Reinhard Schlegel—the largest collection of Beuys multiples ever shown in New York, featuring over 500 works dated between the early 60s to his death in 1986.

By Jori Finkel
Pope.L Makes Statements afarom the Fringes
New York Times March 19, 2015

"LOS ANGELES — It was a plaintive sight: a monumental American flag drooping so low on its pole that it would touch the ground were it not for a wood platform. The artist  Pope.L was tending to the flag carefully. He lifted the tail end, where the stripes were separated at the seams, and spread them apart, the way you might separate a girl’s long hair before braiding it.

“This is just to make sure it catches properly and doesn’t tangle,” he said. An assistant switched on four large Ritter fans, the kind used by movie studios to whip up 40-mile-an-hour winds.

Soon the flag was flying high, a wild, hydra-like form. Only it was not flying in the open air but inside the belly of the Geffen Contemporary, a branch of the Museum of Contemporary Art here, where Mr. Pope.L was readying his largest museum show to date.  [...]"

By Charlotte Burns
Pope.L wants to bring down the house
The Art Newspaper March 16, 2015

The largest-ever museum presentation of work by Pope.L could, quite literally, raise the roof. The centerpiece of the exhibition, Trinket, 2008, is a massive custom-made American flag—around 50 by 20 feet—which will be hung from a pole in the middle of the Geffen Contemporary gallery at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, and blown about by four industrial fans of such strength that the flag’s ends will start to fray. The wind force is such that the building’s ventilation system has been reconfigured to make sure the roof stays intact.

By The Editors of ARTnews
9 Art Events to Attend in New York City this Week
Artnews March 16, 2015

It’s truly rare to see a set multiples from Joseph Beuys, the German performance artist and sculptor active mainly during the ’70s and early ’80s before his death in 1986. Thanks to Reinhard Shlegel, Mitchell-Innes & Nash will show over 500 of these works related to his oddball performances about history and Beuys’ personal life.
Mitchell-Innes & Nash, 534 West 26th Street, 6–8 p.m

By Allison Meier
Over 500 Joseph Beuys Multiples Go on Rare View in NYC
Hyperallergic March 13, 2015

From the 1960s until his death in 1986, German artist Joseph Beuys produced some 557 multiples — small-scale portable and affordable pieces that captured an element of his practice. Joseph Beuys: Multiples from the Reinhard Schlegel Collection, opening today at the Chelsea gallery Mitchell-Innes & Nash, includes over 500 such works by Beuys, the largest exhibition of his multiples yet shown in New York.

Privilege and Its Discontents
by Andrew Durbin
Privilege and Its Discontents
Out Magazine March 11, 2015

By his own calculus, at least, the artist and filmmaker Jacolby Satterwhite could be mistaken for a pop star. “I’m having such a Janet day,” he tells me one night over dinner, pulling up a photo of the singer on his phone. In it, Jackson grimaces nervously at the camera. He has just landed in Miami for the 13th annual Art Basel, the art world’s boozy grand fête and celebrity-heavy blowout. His new autobiographical film, En Plein Air: Diamond Princess, which continues the artist’s inquiry into the nature of the body, will premiere in late April at the Pérez Art Museum, and I’m curious what else he has planned for 2015. Satterwhite, who’s wearing a T-shirt that reads just hype, pauses and sets down his beer.

NEW YNew York - Nancy Graves at Mitchell-Innes & Nash through March 7th, 2015
By Osman Can Yerebakan
NEW YNew York - Nancy Graves at Mitchell-Innes & Nash through March 7th, 2015
Art Observed March 5, 2015

Currently on view at Mitchell-Innes & Nash is a select body of work by artist Nancy Graves, focused around the late artist’s New York-based Foundation, and which promise an expansive look at the pioneer Conceptualist’s bright career before and after her passing in 1995, including a Whitneyretrospective that marked her as the first female artist to have a solo retrospective under museum’s roof.

how jacolby satterwhite conquered the art world
by Emily Manning
how jacolby satterwhite conquered the art world
i-D March 3, 2015

At just 28, Jacolby Satterwhite has already racked up a resume to rival artists twice, even three times his age. The Southern born, New York-based new media master has been featured in the Whitney Biennial, the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, and the Studio Museum in Harlem. Which is probably why Forbes came knocking to feature him in its annual 30 Under 30 spotlight this past year.

Press
Jo Baer, Anne Neukamp, and Diane Simpson
Modern Painters March 2015

There are many surprises in this pleasing, varied three-woman show, but the biggest is Baer's fleshy contribution.  The oil-on-canvas triptyph Facing, Turning (Intro/About), Cleaving (Apart/Together), 1978-79, departs significantly from her austere Minimalist vocabulary, depicting pastel penile forms and feminine curves against a worked, netural ground.  Crisp graphic motifs rest against an expressionist backdrop in paintings by Neukamp, a young Berlin-based astist.  Simpson provides dimension with her architectonic constructions, like the cheekily titled Underskirt, 1986, which resembles a building riven vertically.

Boundary Breaker
By Emily McDermott
Boundary Breaker
Interview March 2015

Through his vast body of work, the late German artist Joseph Beuys blurred the boundary between artist and theorist.  Opening March 13 at Mitchell-Innes & Nash in New York, a new retrospective offers an intimate glimpse into Beuys's masterful oeuvre and influence, alluding to many of his more radical conceptual ideas such as social sculpture, in which he considered society itself as one collaborative work of art.  The month-long show will present past performances as well as installation and and sculptural works that date between 1965 and 1986, the year of his death.  Included in this selection is one version of Beuys's iconic 1970 piece Filzanzug (Felt Suit), a tailored suit that was modeled after his personal garments and operates as something of a shostly self-portrait of an artist whose impact is still being felt today.

It’s Time to Rediscover Nancy Graves: Post-Minimalist, Anti-Pop Lover of Camels
By Mark Guiducci
It’s Time to Rediscover Nancy Graves: Post-Minimalist, Anti-Pop Lover of Camels
Vogue February 28, 2015

In 1969, Nancy Graves was 29 years old and had a solo exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art. She was the youngest person, and only the fifth woman, to be given such an honor, and it landed her work on the cover of Artforum the following year. Graves, as it happened, was also rather glamorous, an heir to the Crane paper family and at the time married to Richard Serra. (Archival photos of her in the studio allude to the kind of unstudied American chic that has to be inherited—call it Waspy sprezzatura.) Later, Graves would go on to work in such a variety of media that she arguably invented some of her own. She was, simply put, an art-world sensation. And yet, there’s a good chance that you’ve never even heard of her.

By E. Baker
London - Virginia Overton at White Cube Mason's Yard trhough March 14th, 2015
Art Observed February 27, 2015

On view in London at White Cube in Mason’s Yard is an exhibition of new large-scale
minimalist sculptures by American artist Virginia Overton. The exhibition is Overton’s
first in the UK.

Overton’s works are unique in their approach at transformation within a space, using
materials that were originally intended for another purpose, recycled and often of very
little commodity value. The artist is from Lebanon, Tennessee, and and, in her own
words, often employs a sense of thrift and economical savvy to assembling her works, a
move which frequently leads to the incorporation of highly biographic elements and
materials in her pieces. Overton is currently based in Brooklyn, NY, where she works
with installation, sculpture, and photography.

By David Ebony
David Ebony's Top 10 New York Gallery Shows for February
Artnet news February 25, 2015

Nancy Graves at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, through March 7
Nancy Graves (1939–1995), was a key figure in the transition from the dominant forms of Minimalism and Conceptualism that marked the late 1960s and '70s, toward a more pluralistic view of art production that became widely embraced in the 1980s and later. This show features a number of strong and rarely exhibited examples from the artist's estate. The image of a camel was central to her work of the 1970s, as part her vocabulary of “realistic illusions" and “natural fictions." Her cryptic camel skeleton sculpture, Inside-Out (1970), made of steel, wax, marble dust, fiberglass, and animal skin, is a highlight of the show. Also on view, projected high on one wall, are a series or early videos, includingIzy Boukir (1970), a film shot in the Sahara, featuring music by Philip Glass. Equally remarkable are her colorful, large-scale paintings from the “Camouflage" series of the 1970s; they prove that Graves was far ahead of her time.

As told to Zachary Cahill
Pope.L
Artforum: 500 Words February 20, 2015

A mainstay of performance and installation art since the 1970s, Pope.L will open the largest museum show of his work to date at the Geffen Contemporary at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, on March 20, 2015. Trinket, 2008, the centerpiece work, and also the title of the show, is a large-scale American flag that will be blown continuously during the museum’s public hours by a bank of industrial fans. Here, Pope.L discusses the show, which runs until June 28, 2015.

By David Rhodes
Like This: An Exhibition of Near-Representations
Artcritical February 19, 2015

This three-woman exhibition consists of very different, though interestingly related, approaches to the use of recognizable subject matter. The subject matter is variously displaced, distorted or fragmented. As a consequence, the paintings and sculptures present combinations of recognizable parts that function abstractly, at once both generalizing, through reconfiguration, and particularizing, through new formal relationships absent in the original context. The new frameworks created represent likenesses, now estranged and somewhat alienated.

5 Must-See Gallery Shows - Nancy Graves, Steven Cox, and More
By Jacqueline Mermea
5 Must-See Gallery Shows - Nancy Graves, Steven Cox, and More
Artinfo February 18, 2018

This exhibition of film, painting, and sculpture from the late artist — who had a solo show at the Whitney in 1969, and died in 1995 — is a tightly curated masterpiece. “Lixit,” 1979, with its fuzzed-out background evoking an airbrush effect, could be a Michael Williams painting from 30 seconds ago. “Xola,” 1977, is a tangle of color, line, and blank-canvas breathing room, a compositional jungle hiding several camels. That beast makes an appearance elsewhere — in the floor sculpture “Inside Outside,” in which it’s deconstructed into bits and pieces, and in “Head on Spear,” a furry, impaled camel head that seems to be surveying the entire show, barely suppressing a smirk. 1971’s “Bone Finger,” suspended from the ceiling, hangs tufts of dirtied gauze on a steel armature to create an enigmatic totem. And Graves shows her facility with bronze in the multi-part “Measure,” 1978, a cluster of fecal or intestinal nests that manage to be loveable despite the associations they evoke.

POPE.L DISCUSSES HIS ARTFORUM COVER AT CAA: ‘LEAVE ME OUT OF IT’
By Dan Duray
POPE.L DISCUSSES HIS ARTFORUM COVER AT CAA: ‘LEAVE ME OUT OF IT’
Artnews February 17, 2015

“I have a very divided take about being on the cover of Artforum,” said Pope.L, who is black. “That’s something I’m supposed to want. All artist are supposed to want that. It’s really funny when you get what you want and you have no idea what it is. You have fantasies about these things, and you get drunk and you talk about these things. ‘Oh, my Guggenheim show, we’ll get drunk and we’ll be in the back with our friends.’ It’s never like that.”

By Pamela Kort
Brent Wadden | Peres Projects
Artforum October 2013

Working on a back-strap loom, this young Canadian artist intertwines acrylic yarns with hand-spun wools that he then stitches together and finally mounts on raw canvas. The large-scale works that result are more than simply intriguing: They take to task all kinds of preconceptions about painting.

By Pari Ehsan
Lyrical Texture
Paridust February 13, 2015

The first exhibit of the year that struck me was this, a group show of work by Jo Baer, Anne Neukamp and Diane Simpson at MITCHELL-INNES & NASH. A dazzling palate of muted colors, geometric forms and brilliant textures are melodic together in one room. The common conceptual thread is that each artist begins with specific references which are then transformed into the realm of abstraction.

Buhmann on Art, Week of Feb. 12, 2015
By Stephanie Buhmann
Buhmann on Art, Week of Feb. 12, 2015
Chelsea Now February 12, 2015

An internationally acclaimed conceptual artist, Graves (1939–1995) has been featured in hundreds of notable exhibitions and her work is in the permanent collections of major art museums. Born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, Graves earned her MFA in painting at Yale in 1964, where her classmates included Robert and Sylvia Mangold, Brice Marden, Chuck Close, and Richard Serra (to whom she was married from 1965 to 1970).

In Focus: Nancy Graves
By Tali Jaffe
In Focus: Nancy Graves
Cultured Magazine February 2015

Last week, Mitchell-Innes & Nash gallery in Chelsea presented “Nancy Graves,” a solo show of works by the prolific painter who came to prominence in the late 60s, following her solo show at the Whitney in 1969. With the continuous buzz surrounding MoMA’s “Forever Now” and a resurgence in the medium among contemporary artists, Graves’ influence continues to surface—even two decades after her passing.

By David Joselit
Material Witness
Artforum February 2015

Art Historian David Joselit takes up the case of Eric Garner and its challenge to the very concept of visual evidence or representation--and its denial of images and objects as evidence of fact.  Joselit considers the possibility of critical and artistic practices that may counter such failures of representation, instead staging a refusal or representation--a refusal perhaps nowhere more potent than in the performances of Pope.L, whether the artist is literally ingesting and expelling information, in Eating the Wall Street Journal, 1991-2000, or, in Foraing (Asphyxia Version), 1993-95/2008, covering his head with a white plastic bag that he clutches tightly below his chin.  Is this act of self-erasure a gesture of annihilation, as the word asphyxia suggests, or is it a strategic subtraction of the body from a sphere in which that body cannot be represented anyway--cannot be visible or evident, or is subject to censure and repression?

*Text source: Artforum, Febuary 2015

By Natasha Kuchanova
Jessica Stockholder: ‘Art changes, taking account of the present moment’
Studio International December 2014

"Jessica Stockholder talks about her work, which combines painting, sculpture, installation and language in a unique creation that calls for a close personal encounter with the viewer."

Jacolby Satterwhite: Portfolio
Press
Jacolby Satterwhite: Portfolio
Artforum January 2015

TRINA, THE RAPPER FROM MIAMI, is also known as the Diamond Princess, and her crystalline image is everywhere, from the fan site Oh-Trina.com to bottles of her namesake perfume. She is everywhere, in particular, in Jacolby Satterwhite’s new series of tableaux, “En Plein Air.” Endless iterations of her pneumatic figure populate galactic landscapes in glittery jewel tones, surrounded by renderings of other contorted, slickly muscled bodies—including that of Satterwhite himself.  

Kiki Kogelnik
Press
Kiki Kogelnik
Artforum January 2015

Kiki Kogelnik’s art has rarely been seen in New York aside from a superb 2012 show of work from the 1960s at Simone Subal, despite the fact that the artist, who died in 1997, lived in the city for the entirety of her adult life and maintained close friendships with other significant artists such as Roy Lichtenstein and Claes Oldenburg. With “Cuts, Fissures and Identity: Works from the 1960s and 70s,” a second exhibition at Simone Subal that opened this past November, Kogelnik’s art feels hard to ignore; it puts pressure on a Pop moment we thought we knew, and, in doing so, forces us to reconsider things we may have guessed about Pop but were afraid to ask.

By Steven Zevitas
15 Artists to Watch in 2015
Huffpost Arts & Culture December 16, 2014

Wadden is another artist who has been making the rounds in Europe for several years, but is little known on this side of the Atlantic. That will change in 2015 when Mitchell-Innes & Nash gives him a solo show in their Chelsea space. His practice lies at the intersection of the fine and applied arts. Working with a back-strap loom, Wadden intertwines acrylic yarns with wool and then stitches the material together before mounting it on raw canvas. The finished works, which he considers to be paintings, refer to high art, low art, the domestic arts, Pollock, Klee and indigenous traditions of art making. They are mesmerizing, not only due to their final visual state, but because of the viewer is made to "feel" the labor deployed in their making. In their facture, they are also an extraordinary subversion, a softening, of the maleness usually ascribed to geometric and hard-edged abstraction.
 

Jacolby Satterwhite Keeps Reality Virtual
by Alicia Eler
Jacolby Satterwhite Keeps Reality Virtual
Hyperallergic December 15, 2014

Jacolby Satterwhite’s solo exhibition How lovly is me being as I am is born out of a maternal virtual hive mind. Satterwhite fills OHWOW, a spacious white cube in West Hollywood, with 10 large-scale C-prints from the series Satellites and En Plein Air, four nylon-and-enamel sculptures called “Metonym,” and the six-channel video “Reifying Desire.” The visual centerpiece of this show, for which it is named, is a purple-lit neon sign, which sets the tone for this exhibition’s breezy tour through a hyperactive virtualized video game imagination.

Mary Kelly
By Stephanie Bailey
Mary Kelly
Artforum December 1, 2014

One line in the 1959 Situationist film from which Mary Kelly’s exhibition “On the Passage of a few People through a Rather Brief Period of Time” took its name hovered over the show: “When freedom is practiced in a closed circle, it fades into a dream, becomes a mere representation of itself.” Take Circa 1968, 2004, around which the show revolved: a large-scale case that took some six months to make from the lint of roughly ten thousand pounds of laundry collected from a tumble dryer (using a process Kelly devised in 1999). The piece depicts Jean-Pierre Rey’s iconic image for Life magazine taken on the day before May 14, 1968, strikes in Paris, showing socialite Caroline de Bendern – like a twentieth-century update of Delacroix’s Liberty Leading the People  - wielding a Vietnamese flag over a charged crowd while sitting on the shoulders of artist and studnt occupation leader Jean-Jacques Lebel. Of course, the image is problematic: an accident in which the notably non-revolutionary de Bendern was case as the ultimate icon of the movement.

Press
Selections from the Reinhard Schlegel Collection of Multiples
Exhibited Films & Recordings

List of exhibited films & recordings featured in Joseph Beuys: Multiples, From the Reinhard Schlegel Collection.

Press
Joseph Beuys: The Schlegel Collection of Multiples
Exhibition Newspaper

Illustrated publication with an essay by the curator Dr. Prof. Eugen Blume; produced in conjunction with the exhibition.

Press
from Joseph Beuys editions Catalogue of the Schlegel Collection

Selections from Joseph Beuys editions Catalogue of the Schlegel Collection.

Press
Joseph Beuys: Multiple Message
By Dr. Prof. Eugen Blume

Essay by the curator Eugen Blume; included in the limited edition, illustrated publication produced in conjunction with the exhibition.

Kiki Kogelnik Adds Threat to Pop
by Blake Gopnik
Kiki Kogelnik Adds Threat to Pop
artnet news November 6, 2014

This is Skull, a vinyl hanging assembled around 1970 by a little-known Austrian artist named Kiki Kogelnik. She was active in New York in the 1960s and 70s, straddling Pop art and feminism, and died in 1997. Her work is now having its second solo outing at Simone Subal Gallery in New York. What particularly intrigues me about this work by Kogelnik is its unique mix of goofy 1960s optimism (in its materials and forms) and bodily threat (in its subject matter). Come to think of it, that’s exactly where you’d imagine a smart feminist to be taking Pop art.

Jacolby Satterwhite’s Kinetic Mixed-Media Creations
by Kevin McGarry
Jacolby Satterwhite’s Kinetic Mixed-Media Creations
T Magazine November 4, 2014

Eccentricity was inevitable for Jacolby Satterwhite, who grew up in South Carolina with a mother who dreamed of “becoming a famous inventor on the Home Shopping Network,” and two “flamboyant dancer-slash-fashion-designer brothers.” The New York-based artist stood out at this spring’s Whitney Biennial with “Reifying Desire 6,”a Boschian mix of performance, digital art and painting. His first solo show in L.A. opens this month at OHWOW gallery and draws inspiration from many sources, or “archives,” as he calls them, such as drawings made by his mother, which he uses to mine his own past.

Kiki Kogelnik
Press
Kiki Kogelnik
Artforum Winter 2014

Two silhouettes cut from sheet vinyl, one black, one butterscotch, hang from two coat hangers that are looped through wire to the canvas’s upmost edge. Slung against an acrylic gradient (pink-rimmed azure melted in lavender), each silhouette traces the contours of a body once full but now flayed: an enervated membrane, all surface and no sex. Sterile yet strangely seductive, like moltings from a space being, they treat the body as schema or sieve, limp and radically inorganic.

By Julie Engebrecht
CAM Exhibit Reviews Native Son Wesselman's Career
Cincinnati.com October 25, 2014

Cincinnati Art Museum is the fourth and final stop for the Tom Wesselmann retrospective "Beyond Pop Art."


Wesselmann left his hometown of Cincinnati in 1956 to study art in New York and worked nearly nonstop across six different decades before he died in 2004.


He was called a pop artist because he was of that era and sometimes style, though he never fully embraced the label. Those years of work showed him to be so much more.


"I had no interest in social commentary. I wanted to be an artist in the finest historical sense of the word," he told The Enquirer in a 1995 interview.

Martha Rosler Tackles the Problems of Representation
Cassie Packard
Martha Rosler Tackles the Problems of Representation
Hyperallergic October 16, 2014

Representation gets a bad rap. Its inadequacy is inbuilt; it’s doomed to fail us; the thing it strives to capture and communicate endlessly eludes it. But it’s what we have, so we use our crude visual and verbal tools to circumscribe, gibber, and gesture. Drooling a bit, we imagine a method of communication that would translate its subject perfectly and entirely. Prior to the age of #nofilter, photography was believed to contain this possibility. Sometimes the medium —particularly the documentary genre — still pretends.

In the ’70s, photographer (and videographer, and rigorous cultural critic, and possible genius) Martha Rosler brought a critical eye, politically and philosophically, to the medium’s seductive pretenses of objectivity. Her photo-text piece ―The Bowery in two inadequate descriptive systems‖ (Dec. 1974–Jan. 1975), currently on display at the Lethaby Gallery in Central Saint Martins, wrestles with issues of representation and serves as a deadpan expression of her disappointment and frustration with mainstream humanist documentary.

Remembering Anthony Caro
By Toby Glanville
Remembering Anthony Caro
The Financial Times October 10, 2014

The sculptor passed away a year ago this month, just as his major show in Venice was coming to a close. He is remembered here by the photographer who was working with him, and in a new book about his life and art.

Press
The Financial Times
Leon Kossoff: Drawn In By The Old Masters October 10, 2014

'It's very private, this relationship with paintings, how they get inside your mind... When you are drawing a painting you see and experience it differently, your mind wakes up.' For most of his life, Leon Kossoff has been coming to London's National Gallery to study and sketch its Old Masters.  With some of these drawings about to go on show at Frieze Masters Jackie Wullschlager joins the artist for a tour of his favorite paintings.

Press
The Financial Times
Leon Kossoff: Drawn In By The Old Masters October 10, 2014

'It's very private, this relationship with paintings, how they get inside your mind... When you are drawing a painting you see and experience it differently, your mind wakes up.' For most of his life, Leon Kossoff has been coming to London's National Gallery to study and sketch its Old Masters.  With some of these drawings about to go on show at Frieze Masters Jackie Wullschlager joins the artist for a tour of his favorite paintings.

Press
Leon Kossoff: Drawing Paintings Catalogue
Eddie Martinez Edges Toward Abstraction
By Scott Indrisek
Eddie Martinez Edges Toward Abstraction
ArtInfo September 19, 2014

After “Matador,” a 2013 exhibition at the Journal Gallery in Brooklyn, Eddie Martinez sort of hated paint. “I had a negative reaction, I got really turned off by it,” said the artist, who found himself avoiding the studio after completing the works in the aforementioned show: Large, quasi-abstract canvases that serially explored the contours of a Picasso-esque bull. To deal with his creative block, Martinez started walking the beach on the North Fork of Long Island during the summer, pondering if three-dimensional work might be the way forward.

Artnet news
By Blake Gopnik
Artnet news
Justine Kurland Portrays Our Kink For Cars September 19, 2014

The new body of work is (partly) about America’s so-called “love affair” with the car, which in Kurland’s hands becomes as complex a relationship as any real couple could have: There’s real affection, but also MADness (as in, Mutually Assured Destruction). In this photo, the couple have got to the point where they’re dressing the same, but the man’s embrace is also a taking apart. (Turn the picture sideways and they start slow dancing.) Kurland’s subjects have often been sentimental: Her love affair with her little tyke, for instance, and their Rootabaga Story adventures among the trains that made the West. But what’s crucial is that she treats her motifs without sentiment. (Courtesy the artist and Mitchell-Innes & Nash, NY)

September 18, 2014
Artnet news
Justine Kurland at Mitchell-Innes & Nash: Finding Grace in the Garage September 18, 2014

Titled “Sincere Auto Care” with demotic aplomb (the new series of work is named after an actual auto body shop in Nebraska), Kurland’s exhibition functions, according to the gallery press release, as an exploration of American car culture and the enduring fantasy of the open road. But, in our time, the once robust cruiser-ideal of Ford and GM has given way to massive layoffs and killer ignition switches, while the epic adventure of Easy Rider has downshifted to survival of the fittest in The Rover. In theaters and on the street, Manifest Destiny has shed its rosy-cheeked utopianism for a grizzled dystopian pallor. No wonder its exhausted face shows up repeatedly in Kurland’s photos looking feral, meth-addicted, and unemployed.

By Vince Aletti
New Yorker
Justine Kurland September 17, 2014

A photographer who started out as a fantasist—staging scenes of young girls escaping together into idyllic landscapes—has turned into one of our most talented realists. Kurland remains a storyteller, and her new work combines engaged photojournalism with a sure feel for its narrative possibilities. Her latest pictures, of wrecked cars, auto-repair shops, and mechanics, reflect her recent years on the American road, usually in the company of her son, who shows up here as the youngest member in a cast of rough-and-ready guys. Kurland’s take on masculinity is an ideal balance of appreciation and critique. With no women in sight, the automobile becomes the focus of all erotic attention. Through Oct. 11.

By Linda Yablonsky
Scene & Herd: There Goes The Neighborhood
Artforum September 10, 2014

Linda Yablonsky coveres the start of the September New York gallery season.

"It was equally jammed at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, where Justine Kurland was showing modest new photographs taken in and around auto-body shops she has visited while driving a car old enough to need frequent servicing."

Vulture
By Jerry Saltz
Vulture
The Saltz Cornucopia: 10 Fall Art Shows, Reviewed September 10, 2014

At Mitchell-Innes & Nash, art-world gypsy-photographer Justine Kurland exhibits pictures of mechanics and garages taken all across this country. None of them are composed in your typical boring art-world format, around one person, usually of one ethnic, racial, sexual, or economic type, or one variety of object — tools, buildings, vehicles, electric chairs.

By Olya Turcihin
Arte Fuse
Auto Erotic Romance by Kurland September 8, 2014

Cheerios in the hands of a mechanic dressed in ripped jeans, the inner abstract geometry of an engine exposed within an open hood, a dead bird elegantly held upside down by one leg, the frenetic beauty of a smashed window – all these and more are the images one experiences in the vivid photography of Justine Kurland for her solo show, Sincere Auto Care. The narrative format of the photos express the feelings of freedom and of the mundane surrounding this truly American phenomenon evokes. Kurland presents the predominantly masculine culture that surrounds the sexy, freedom inducing American dream of “the car”. But within the small details, one notices perhaps a romantic delicateness that underlies this world.

By Molly Gottschalk
Artsy
After a 12-Year-Long Road Trip, Justine Kurland Captures the American Dream and the Freedom of the Open Road September 7, 2014

In her new series, “Sincere Auto Care,” on view at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, Kurland again offers observations from her travels; this time documenting—with a nod to Walker Evans—cars, mechanics, and the freedom of life on the open road. Photographed across the U.S. over the course of the last three years, some 35 photographs find beauty in the characteristically bleak: a gritty hand or dangling roadkill; a shaggy-haired “junkie” in Tacoma; a tattooed mechanic, tucked under the body of a Mercedes 280 Coup; a driver holding a gleaming Cadillac wheel with wire spokes. All that, as she says, exist in a place “where beauty is found not because the world is beautiful but because it is beautifully described.”

Hyperallergic
By John Yau
Hyperallergic
John Yau and Justine Kurland Discuss the Relationship of Photography, Poetry, and Narrative September 7, 2014

John Yau and Justine Kurland discuss Kurland's most recent body of work, Sincere Auto Care, and the relationship between photography, poetry and narrative.

Artinfo
By Ashton Cooper
Artinfo
20 Questions For Cross-Country Traveler Justine Kurland September 4, 2014

Ashton Cooper from Blouin Artinfo asks Justine Kurland about her two current exhibitions at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, her practice and her inspiration.

T Magazine
By Rebecca Bengal
T Magazine
Justine Kurland’s Vivid, Haunting Photographs of Men and Cars September 3, 2014

For more than a decade, Justine Kurland has taken photographs during annual cross-country journeys from New York to the Pacific Northwest that reveal the double-edged nature of the American dream. A lifelong nomad (she grew up traveling to Renaissance festivals, where her mother sold hand-sewn clothes), her tools are her 4×5 camera and her van, which allow her to dwell, briefly, in the worlds of the marginal figures she photographs. First, there were the girls she cast as runaways, forging into forests and swimming holes. Later came images of commune members in wilderness idylls and panoramas of westbound freighters and the hobos who ride them.

Barry McGee X Eddie Martinez
By Barry McGee, Rachel Small
Barry McGee X Eddie Martinez
Interview September 2014

Eddie Martinez is indomitable. He is a prolific draftsman, an active curator, and he's getting ready to fill a four-story gallery in Seoul, South Korea, early next year. His idiosyncratic drawing style is deceptively simple and has the magical, faux naïve quality of Paul Klee. The 31-year-old's large studio in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, is filled with ceramic miniatures he's been collecting for years. It also holds an extraordinary amount of work: charcoal drawings of his French bulldog, ink sketches of densely covered tabletops, and walls covered in large canvases. Martinez shows at ZieherSmith in Chelsea, New York, but has been spending more time on the South Shore in Massachusetts, where he has a second studio.
 

Modern Painters
Bio Pic
Modern Painters
Sarah Braman September 2014

The story behind the artist's work, in her once words.

Review: Jay DeFeo
By Lauren O'Neill-Butler
Review: Jay DeFeo
Artforum September 2014

This exhibition--which focused on Jay DeFeo's production following her three-year hiatus from artmaking after her completion of The Rose, 1958-66, her famous, one-ton painting of a burst of white light--gathered forty-nine pieces from the last fifteen years of the artist's life, several of which were absent from her recent traveling US retrospective.  DeFeo, whos early work was animated by jazz and Beat subcultures and by the varied frequencies coursing through the San Francisco Renaissance, was also well known for her round-the-clock, sedulous-yet-playful ingenuity.  She worked quickly until the end; many of the pieces here were produced in the last four years of her life, the most industrious period of her career.

By Ken Johnson
The New York Times
Where Minimalist Meets Showy: Zhang Huan and Virginia Overton Contrast at Storm King August 7, 2014

MOUNTAINVILLE, N.Y. — Sculptures by the two artists featured here in temporary presentations at Storm King Art Center this year couldn’t be less alike. A single Minimalist piece by the New York sculptor Virginia Overton is gracefully fitted to the landscape of gently rolling hills. Six monumental, figurative sculptures by Zhang Huan of Shanghai are ponderously theatrical.

By Ray Mark Rinaldi
Pop! Goes the world of Tom Wesselmann
The Denver Post August 3, 2014

There will inevitably come a time when the pop art of the 1960s loses its pop. When before you can explain how great Andy Warhol's "Brillo Boxes" is, you will have to explain that Brillo was a product made from steel wool that people used to scour dirty pots and pans back in the day.

Looking at the retrospective of Tom Wesselmann's work at the Denver Art Museum this summer, you wonder if that dark age has dawned. Sunbeam bread? Royal Crown Cola? Do people even eat those things anymore? Images of consumer products like that are the starting point of his art, as they were for many of his peers working in the second half of the 20th century.

Jay DeFeo
By Wendy Vogel
Jay DeFeo
Modern Painters July/August 2014

The Rose, DeFeo's sculpture-cum-painting over which she lavored for eight years, dominated discussions of her retrospective last year.  This show of drawings, photographs, and collages, free from the shadow of its myth, allows consideration of her wry improvisations and neo-Surrealist approach.